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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 1, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Abbie Ritnour, 92, one of New Madison's oldest residents, died Wednesday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Whit Roe in that town after an illness of three months. She was the widow of the late Virgil Ritnour. Nieces and nephews survive. Services were held Friday afternoon at the Stutz and Sando funeral home in New Madison, with burial in Greenmound cemetery.

[Stutz, Sando and Storch Funeral Home Records adds no additional information except that she was born in 1852.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 1, 1944

Died --- Stephen G. Helm, 85, native of Greenville, died at the Darke County Home Thursday morning after a lingering illness. Services were held in the Turpen-McKnight funeral home Friday afternoon with burial in Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 1, 1944

Died --- Miss Rose Thomas, 74, former Greenville resident, died suddenly Thursday evening from heart attach at the Darke County Home where she had lived for the past 18 years. There are no immediate survivors. Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the Stocker funeral home in Greenville, with Rev. W. L. Denlinger officiating. Burial was in the Home cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 3, 1944

First Police Chief Of Greenville Dies.

John P. Lynch, 84, formerly police chief of Greenville, died Friday evening at his residence at 611 East Third street, Greenville. He had been ill for an extended period, and had been bedfast since May 31. He was a lifelong resident of Greenville, and was a member of St. Mary's Catholic church and the Knights of Columbus.

He retired from the police department Aug. 1, 1941, after 42 years of continuous service, 27 years of which he had served as chief of the police department. During the two years before the organization of the police department in 1899 he had served as town marshal. He was then appointed one of the first patrolmen when the police department was organized.

Surviving is one son, James. Funeral services were held Monday morning at St. Mary's church where requiem high mass was solemnized by the Rev. Father John A. Gnau. Burial was in the church cemetery east of Greenville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 3, 1944

Amy Brumfield Dies Suddenly At Sister's Home.

Miss Amy Brumfield, 85, died Sunday afternoon at 12:20 o'clock at the residence of her sister, Mrs. Harry Peacock in Winchester, where she had gone to see her sisters, Mrs. Peacock, Mrs. Carie Westfall and Mrs. Mariam Ludy. She was stricken suddenly ill and passed away a short time later.

She was born near Jericho the daughter of Jessie and Harriot Brumfield and spent her early life in Randolph county. She later moved to Kansas where she taught school, later returning to Randolph county where she has resided for the past thirty-five years.

She is survived by one foster son, Otto C. Ostrand of Dodge City, Kan.; four sister, Mrs. Melinda Macy, Mrs. Ludy, Mrs. Westfall and Mrs. Peacock, all of Winchester; and one nephew, Don Hinshaw of Union City.

The body was removed to the Maynard and Walker funeral home where it will remain until 9:30 a. m. Tuesday after which it will be removed to the Peacock residence. Funeral services will be held at the Jericho church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. Esther Cook. Interment will be in the Jericho cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 3, 1944

Emma Strait Dies Following Heart Attack.

Mrs. Emma Alice Strait, 64, wife of John H. Strait, died at 9:30 a. m. Sunday at her home eight miles southeast of Union City following a heart attack. She was born in Sugar Grove, Ohio, the daughter of John J. and Mary (Amsbaugh) Wilson, and was married at Woodington, Ohio, on July 8, 1897. She was a member of the Lutheran church.

Surviving besides the husband are ten children: Mrs. Carrie Overhalser of Greenville; Mrs. Esta Cruze of Ansonia; Mrs. Opal Bradburn of Winchester; Cleo of Springfield, Clarence of Richmond, Orval of Rossburg; Forrest of Ansonia; Leroy Junior of near Greenville; and Dale of the armed forces stationed in Oklahoma.

The body was taken to the Brooks funeral home in Union City for burial preparations. Funeral services will be held at the Brooks funeral home Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Earl Lantz officiating. Friends may call at the residence after noon Tuesday.

[All ten children were in attendance at the funeral services.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 3, 1944

Darke County Death.

Otto Recker, 39, realtor and insurance broker of Versailles, was found dead at his home Thursday by his wife, Pearl. Heart attack is given as the cause of death. He maintained offices in Piqua but lived in Vermillion. Surviving besides the widow are one brother and two sistrs, all of Piqua. Funeral services were held at the residence Sunday afternoon with burial in Greenlawn cemetery, Versailles.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 5, 1944

Graveside Services Held Monday For Infant Brandenburg.

Graveside services were held at Fountain Park cemetery Monday morning at 10:30 o'clock for the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brandenburg of Harrisville. Rev. Herbert Boase of the Winchester Methodist church officiated.

The infant died at the Randolph County hospital Saturday evening.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 5, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Martha Alice Eikenberry, 84, widow of the late Albert L. Eikenberry, well known Greenville merchant, and co-owner of the Mozart store, died Saturday afternoon at the Wayne hospital in Greenville from pneumonia following surgery. She had lived in Greenville 50 years and was the last of a family of nine children. Surviving are two sons, two daughters and three grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon, with burial in Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 5, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Lennie Moore, 80, widow of Adolphus Moore, of Hollansburg, died Sunday morning at the Carter Rest Home in Greenville after an illness of two months. One sister, several nieces and nephews survive. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon in the Hollansburg Christian church, with burial in the church cemetery.

[Stutz, Sando and Storch Funeral Home Records state that she was born April 15, 1864 at New Madison, Darke Co., OH, the daughter of George Hamilton and Ellen Harter (both b. New Madison, Darke Co., OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 5, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Clara Brock Snyder, 60, former resident of Darke County, died at her home in Piqua Saturday afternoon from injuries received from falling down a flight of stairs five days before. She was the widow of James Riley Snyder and was a member of the Grace Methodist church in Piqua and the Golden Star Council No. 67, D. of A., at New Weston. Surviving are seven children and 33 grandchildren. Funeral services were held at Grace Methodist church in Piqua Wednesday at 3 p. m., with burial in Forest Hill cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 7, 1944

Robert J. Watt Dies In Hospital.

Robert J. Watt, 82, who lived at the home of Mrs. Jennie Keller at 204 Main street in Union City, died Friday morning in the Wayne hospital, Greenville, from an attack of apoplexy. He had suffered a previous attack in Mary's Cafe in Union City about two months ago.

Mr. Watt was a native of Warren County, Ohio, where he spent his early life. During his active years he was employed in the Malleable Iron Works at Dayton. Upon retiring six years ago he came to Union City. He was employed for a time at the Armstrong Greenhouse near Union City. His wife died nine years ago following the death in an auto accident of a son, Harry.

Surviving are one son, William, of Dayton; four grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Emma White of Saratoga and Mrs. Jennie Puckett of St. Petersburg, Fla. Mrs. L. M. Early of Union City is a niece. Funeral plans have not been completed, but the services will be held in Dayton.

[Funeral services were held on Monday afternoon at the Frank Riesinger funeral home at 1334 West Third street, Dayton, with Rev. R. W. Moon officiating. Burial was made in the Frank Riesinger mausoleum.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 7, 1944

Dies At Columbus.

Funeral services were held at Columbus, Ohio, Wednesday for Channing Webster Brandon, 85, formerly of Greenville, whose wife, a former Union City resident, died less than a month ago. He was one of the founders of the Columbus Mutual Life Insurance Co. and was president of the company till his retirement several years ago in favor of his son, Harry P. Brandon, who survives, together with another son, William T. Brandon; one daughter, Miss Mary Brandon; three grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, all of Columbus.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 7, 1944

Father of Winchester Man Dies Wednesday.

Frank Bertram, 69, of Modoc, died Wednesday in a hospital in Richmond.

Surviving are the widow, Candia, one daughter, Mrs. Bonnie Gibson of Albany, Ky.; and five sons, Elmer of Economy, Willie of Winchester, Sterlie and Otto of Modoc, and Roscoe of Albany, Ky.

The body was taken to Albany, Ky., Wednesday for burial.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 8, 1944

Fountain City Lad Dies Under Wheels Of Tractor.

Richmond, Ind., July 8 - (INS) -- A fall beneath the wheels of a tractor today had led to the death of William S. Ponder, 14, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ponder, of near Fountain City.

Coroner Henry Unser began an investigation of the accident which occurred on the Arba pike seven miles north of Richmond. The youth was riding on the fender and fell beneath a tractor being used by George Riley to pull a hay bailer, witnesses said.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 8, 1944

Carl D. Mullen Dies At Hospital Thursday Evening.

Carl D. Mullen, 64 years of age, died at the Randolph County hospital Thursday evening. He is survived by three brothers, Clyde Mullen of near Winchester, Fred of Farmland, and Glen of near Ridgeville, and one sister, Mrs. Alice Hiatt of near Ridgeville.

The body was taken to the Middleton funeral home in Ridgeville where it will remain until one hour before the service which will be held at 2:30 Saturday afternoon at the Nazarene church in Winchester. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery in Winchester. Rev. Walters will be in charge of the services.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 8, 1944

Died --- Funeral services were held at Springfield, Ill., Thursday for Isaac L. Fremd, former resident of Versailles, Darke County, Ohio.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 10, 1944

Pfc. H. O. Yoder Killed In Action While Overseas.

A seventh death message resulting from the war came to the Union City community Friday from the Adjutant General of the U. S. Army at Washington, D. C. It was delivered to Mrs. Ruby E. Yoder who lives two miles northeast of the city in Jackson Township, Darke County, Ohio, on the Maynard Willis farm, and it read as follows:

"The Secretary of War desires me to express his deep regret that your husband, Private First Class Howard O. Yoder was killed in action June 13 in the European area. Letter follows."

Pfc. Yoder was 26 years of age, having been born near Williamsburg, Wayne County, Ind., March 5, 1918, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Forrest C. Yoder. The family moved to the Spartanburg community, and later to the Union City community. He was living on the Mered Blocher farm southeast of Union City and east of the Union City Country Club when he entered the military service Jan. 3, 1944. In addition to farming he worked for the Big Four Railroad Co.

On June 21, 1941, he was married to Miss Ruby E. Mote of Union City, who survives him, together with one daughter, Patty, not yet three years old, and two children by a former marriage, Shirley, aged six, and Harold (Sonny), aged five. A third daughter, Nancy Sue, died a few months ago. Other survivors include the parents, who live on the Willis farm; four sisters, Mrs. John Holden of Union City, Mrs. Pearl Farley of Anderson, Ind., Mrs. Nathan Coblentz of northeast of Union City, and Miss Dora Ellen Yoder, at home; four brothers, William F. of Coletown, Ohio, Robert of northwest of Union City, Henry of northeast of Union City, and Corp. Alva B. Yoder of the Army now home on furlough from Ft. Dix, N. J. Besides these are a host of friends whose deepest sympathy is extended to those bereaved.

Pfc. Yoder received his training at Ft. Frances E. Warren, Cheyenne, Wyoming. This training included work in the cooking and graves division of the Quartermaster Department. He went overseas from Ft. Warren May 1 and wrote four letters home, the last of which was dated June 9. This letter mailed in England said that he was O. K. and asked the family not to worry about him. Whether he took part in the invasion of France is not known, but his last letter made no reference to the invasion.

If the message from the War Department proves to be correct, it can be truthfully said of Pfc. Howard O. Yoder that after five and one-half months of service, in which his record was good, he made the supreme sacrifice and left to his children, and to all other children, the priceless heritage of a free America and a free world in which to live and work and be happy.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 10, 1944

Useful Life Of Jere O'Connor Comes To Close.

Death removed a familiar Union City figure at 5:30 Sunday evening when it summoned Jeremiah O'Connor, 83, at the Union City hospital. The veteran retired railroader had been in ill health for two years, and was critically ill one week. A fractured hip contributed to his declining physical condition.

Mr. O'Connor was born in Union City March 17, 1861. His parents were Thomas and Margaret Douglas-O'Connor who were born in Ireland. During his active years he was a faithful and efficient employe of the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. In his boyhood he attended St. Mary's school, and he was a devoted member of St. Mary's Catholic church.

Surviving are one brother, James T. O'Connor, of Union City, and many friends who will remember the plain, quiet, unassuming, useful life of Jeremiah O'Connor.

The body is at the Fraze funeral home. Funeral services will be held in St. Mary's church Wednesday at 9 a. m. with Rev. Fr. A. Knoff officiating. Burial will be in St. Mary's cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 10, 1944

Judge Peacock Dies In Kansas.

Word has reached Randolph County of the death of a former resident, Judge Arthur S. Peacock, at WaKeeney, Kan., at the age of 86 years. He was born near Harrisville in Randolph County March 14, 1858, attended the Harrisville and Jericho schools, moved with his family to Michigan, then to Kansas where he took a homestead. He taught school several years in Kansas and served six years as county superintendent of schools. He was elected probate judge and served 13 terms or 26 years in that office. He performed 843 marriage ceremonies and took pictures of all the couples that he married. He kept a daily record of happenings and for 40 years was the official weather observer for WaKeeney.

In addition to his other work Judge Peacock wrote a column known as Dictagrams for The World for more than 40 years. He wrote for other newspapers and magazines. One of the features of the school reunions held west of Union City each August has been the letter of greeting from Judge Peacock. H was a very forceful and interesting writer. He was an active member of the Masonic lodge and Eastern Star, the Consistory and Knights Templar, serving as secretary for 30 years and recorder in the Knights Templar. "In the passing of Judge Peacock," says the local newspaper, "Trego County loses one of its most historic characters who gave many years of service to the welfare of his county and nation."

Surviving are the widow, Barbara; three sons, T. C. Peacock of WaKeeney; Mose B. of Pullman, Wash.; and Sam F. of Austin, Nev.; two daughter, Mrs. Tacy Davenport of Grand Lodge, Mich., and Mrs. Alice Bigger of Mt. Vernon, Iowa; 22 grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren; one brother and two sisters. Mrs. Anna Shultz of southwest of Union City is a first cousin and H. J. Wickersham of Muncie is a lifelong friend.

Funeral services were held in the Presbyterian church in WaKeeney, with burial in the WaKeeney cemetery where the Masonic lodge conducted services at the grave.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 10, 1944

Died --- Worley W. Barton, 64, member of the Darke County board of education for the past two years, died Friday night at his home at New Madison after a lingering illness. He was a retired farmer and director of the Mutual Fire Insurance Co. of Greenville. Surviving are the widow, two sons, four grandchildren and six sisters. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Universalist church in New Madison, with burial in Greenmound cemetery.

[Stutz, Sando and Storch Funeral Home Records state that Worley Wilson Barton was born Nov. 1879 at Delisle, OH, the son of Franklin Barton (b. Iowa) and Emma Mills (b. Greenville, OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 10, 1944

Died --- Donna Jean Dearth, seven-month's old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Dearth of Pitsburg, died Friday at the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. George Karns, near Pitsburg, following a short illness. Surviving besides the parents are three brothers and two grandfathers (?). Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Stutz and Sando funeral home at Arcanum, with burial in Riverside cemetery, West Milton.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 10, 1944

Died --- Miss Kate Magoto, 57, formerly of Versailles, died Friday at the Darke County Home following a long illness. Two brothers survive. Funeral services were held Monday morning at St. Denis Catholic church, Versailles, with burial in St. Valbert's cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 11, 1944

Educator Dies At Union City Home.

David Addison Puderbaugh, 76, well known western Ohio educator and former assistant county superintendent of Montgomery County, Ohio, schools, died at 8:45 p. m. Monday at his home at 332 North Walnut street in Union City following four years of declining health. He was also well known as a religious worker.

Funeral services will be held in the Union City United Brethren church Thursday at 2 p. m., with the pastor, Rev. R. B. Ditmyer, officiating, assisted by Bishop A. R. Clippinger of Dayton who will deliver the sermon. Burial will be in the Brethren cemetery north of Union City. The body will be returned Wednesday noon from the Brooks funeral home to the Puderbaugh home where friends may call.

A sketch of Mr. Puderbaugh's long and useful life will appear in tomorrow's paper.

Wednesday, July 12 --- (Excerpts) He was ill for four years and ten years of serious illness from arteriole Sclerosis. He was one of nine children born to John and Mary Ann Wenrick-Puderbaugh, sturdy Darke County pioneers. The place of birth was Jackson Township three miles northeast of Union City, and the date was March 23, 1868. The family soon moved near Arlington in Montgomery County, Ohio, where the lad attended school. He was graduated from Ohio Northern University at Ada where he majored in science and pharmacy. He later used his pharmacy when he was part owner of the Puderbaugh-Hawley drug store in Union City, but after about a year he returned to his teaching which he had begun at the age of 17 years.

For five years he performed an unusual service as assistant county superintendent of Montgomery County during the terms of County Superintendents A. A. Maysilles and C. W. Plessinger. This was a time of centralization of schools in the county, in which work Mrs. Puderbaugh was very active. His name is found on the large school buildings at Englewood and other places in the county. After 44 years of school work he retired in 1931. From 1926 to 1936 he lived at Ft. McKinley. The next five years he lived in Greenville, and in 1941 he returned to Union City as his health was beginning to decline.

On June 1, 1890, Mr. Puderbaugh was married to Miss Olive Hart at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Hart, northeast of Union City. The officiating minister was Silas Gilbert. To this union were born a daughter, Mary Ethel, later Mrs. Clarence Lawson, who died in 1940; and one son, Franklin, who is head of the history department of Piqua Central high school. Surviving besides the son are four grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Oliver Royer of Pleasant Hill, Ohio, and Mrs. Minnie Gilbert of Modesto, Cal.; two brothers, T. H. Puderbaugh of Union City and C. V. Puderbaugh of Dayton. Besides these are a host of friends including thousands of former students whose friendship Mr. Puderbaugh gained during his long service in the schools.

He was an active member and officer of the United Brethren church, bringing his membership back to Union City in his last years. He served as lay representative on the U. B. Church Pension Board and for several years was a trustee of the Miami Conference, resigning recently because of ill health. At Ft. McKinley, Greenville and all other places where he lived, he was a leader in religious and temperance work, always fearless and courageous, as he was in educational affairs. He was also a member of the Masonic lodge at Brookville. He was a forceful speaker, and his services were often in demand for educational and religious meetings. As a teacher and school administrator he was very successful, believing firmly in scholarship, discipline and organization as essential to educational advancement. His work in Montgomery County as superintendent and assistant county superintendent was specially outstanding.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 11, 1944

C. W. Rogers, Dead At Lynn, Burial Tuesday.

Charles William Rogers, 64 years old, died at his home, four and a half miles west of Lynn early Saturday afternoon after an illness of several months.

Survivors are the widow, Iva Lorena; one daughter, Mrs. Betty Blickenstaff of Bulsar, India; two sons, William E. of Richmond and Corp. Paul E., stationed in New Guinea; four grandchildren; one brother, Justis Rogers of Wabash, and one sister, Mrs. Will Bowman of Amboy, Ind.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Carlos Christian church, the Rev. Emit Lawshe, of Churubusco, officiating. Burial will be in Buena Vista Cemetery. The body has been removed from the Thomas funeral home to the residence where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 12, 1944

Long Journey Has Ended For Michael Nolan.

Michael A. Nolan, 90, well known retired farmer, died at 9:50 a. m. Tuesday at his home at 714 West Oak street in Union City following several months of failing health.

He was born in New Orleans, La., March 14, 1854, the son of James and Honora Costello-Nolan. The family moved to Pittsburgh, Pa., then to Richmond, Ind., then to Preble County, Ohio, near Eaton. In 1884 the family moved to what is known as the Nolan farm three miles northwest of Union City on the old Deerfield Road, now Highway 28.

After 50 years the death of a sister, Catherine, was followed by the breaking up of the home, and the two remaining brothers, Michael and John, moved to Union City 10 years ago. Another brother, William Nolan, well known school teacher, died in the country home. Other deceased member of the family include Edward Nolan of Ft. Wayne, James Nolan of Richmond, and Mrs. John Coleman of Union City. The only surviving member of the family is John Nolan, the brother, of 714 West Oak street. Michael Nolan, who never married, leaves besides his brother several nieces and nephews.

Michael Nolan gave his life to farming, and in his chosen work he was very successful. The Nolan farm was noted for its production and its attractive appearance. As a neighbor, citizen and friend Michael Nolan sought to discharge his every duty, and he held a high place in the regard of all who knew him. He was a faithful member of St. Mary's Catholic church in Union City under whose guidance he sought sincerely to live a Christian life. In this church the final rites will be held Friday at 9 a. m., with Rev. Fr. A. Knoff officiating. Burial will be in St. Mary's cemetery, Richmond. The body will be returned Wednesday noon from the Brooks funeral home to the Nolan home where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 12, 1944

County Resident Dies At Home Of Son In Union City.

Mrs. Ida Belle Rinard, age 72, widow of Bailey Rinard, died Tuesday morning at 1:10 o'clock, at the home of her son, Ralph Rinard in Union City, Ohio. The body was removed to the Thornburg funeral home for burial preparation, from where it will be taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Neil Wolfe near Winchester Wednesday morning

Survivors are one son Ralph Rinard of Union City, Ohio; one daughter, Mrs. Neil Wolfe of near Winchester, with whom she formerly made her home; two brothers, Oscar Hunt of Eaton, Ohio, and John Bert Hunt of Flat River, Mo.; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 13, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Grace M. Ketring, 46, died Tuesday afternoon at the home of a sister, Mrs. Edith Ireland, three miles southeast of Arcanum, after an extended illness. Surviving are one son; two grandchildren, the mother, two sisters and two brothers, all of Hollansburg. Funeral services will be held Friday at 3 p. m. at the Hollansburg Christian church with Rev. Earl Lantz officiating. Burial will be in the Hollansburg cemetery.

[Stutz, Sando and Storch Funeral Home Records state that she was born in Sept. 1898 in Liberty Township, Darke Co., OH, the daughter of Daniel B. Miller (b. Liberty Twp., Darke Co., OH) and Dasie Moore (b. Jay Co., IN).]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 13, 1944

Died --- A. B. Little,85, retired railroader, died Wednesday morning at his home in Ansonia after a year's illness. He had lived in Ansonia for 30 years. Surviving are the widow, one son, four daughters. Funeral services will be held at the Fisher funeral home in Ansonia Friday at 2:30 p. m., with the Masonic lodge in charge. Burial will be in the Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 13, 1944

Death Closes Long Life Of Lulu Proctor.

Mrs. Lulu Proctor of Union City, Indiana, passed away at 1:40 p. m. Wednesday, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Paul J. Deeming in Winchester where she was brought Sunday night after becoming critically ill while at her farm near Vincennes, Indiana.

Mrs. Proctor, christened Louisa McCoy, was born in Knox County, Indiana, January 20, 1868, the daughter of James S. and Sara McCoy and the granddaughter of Gov. James D. Williams. She was educated at St. Catherine's Convent in Indianapolis, Indiana. On September 26, 1894, she was united in marriage to Charles A. Proctor, whom she accompanied, as a bride, to Union City, Indiana where she has since made her residence at 317 North Columbia street.

She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Paul J. Deeming of Winchester; one son Robert C. Proctor of Ft. Benjamin Harrison; four grandchildren, Nancy and Lynne Proctor, Mary Lou and Bruce Deeming; three sisters, Mrs. Ruth Davidson, Mrs. Nancy Frank and Mrs. Ida Doty all of Petersburg, Indiana and several nieces and nephews, of whom the best locally known is Dr. M. A. Austin of Anderson, Indiana.

One brother, Col. George McCoy, formerly Adjutant General of Indiana, preceded her in death.

She was a member of the Union City Presbyterian church and of the Eastern Star, Over the Tea Cups and Ticknor clubs.

Funeral services for Mrs. Proctor will be held at the Presbyterian church in Union City at 2 p. m. Friday with Rev. D. R. Wilson officiating. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery.

[A later article gives her name as Mrs. Louisa Proctor.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 13, 1944

Death Claims Lynn Man - Burial Friday.

Amon Ozbun, 76 years old, died at his home near Lynn early Tuesday afternoon after a lingering illness.

He is survived by four sons, Lester of Fountain City, Emery of Economy, Paul of Richmond, and Jesse of near Lynn.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Friday at the Thomas funeral home in Lynn in charge of Rev. Zelma Mills. Burial will be in the Buena Vista cemetery.

Friends may call at the home in Lynn after 6 p. m. Wednesday until noon Friday at which time the body will be removed to the Thomas funeral home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 14, 1944

Dr. C. I. Stephen Dead At Ansonia.

Dr. Charles I. Stephen, 70, prominent Darke County physician well known in Union City and community, died at 9:20 a. m. Thursday at the Wayne hospital in Greenville after an illness of two months. He was the son of John C. and Izora Woods Stephen and was born and reared in Jackson Township, Darke County, in the Flag Valley community. He was a graduate of the Ansonia high school.

He was graduated from the old Sterling Medical College at Columbus, now part of Ohio State University, in 1897, and had practiced at Ansonia for the past 44 years following three years at Trotwood, Ohio. He was active in county, district and state medical circles and was one of the leading members of the Darke County Medical Society, having been a past president of the organization and delegate to the annual meetings of the Ohio State Medical Society where he served on the public relations committee. In 1908 he completed graduate study in the Chicago Policlinic.

Dr. Stephen served as a member of the Darke County Board of Health since 1922 and was a member of the bard of directors of the Wayne hospital in Greenville. He was an active member of the Ansonia Christian church, Masonic lodge, Kiwanis club, and board of education for several terms. During the first world war he served in the medical corps of the U. S. Army.

Surviving are the widow, Lucella; three daughters; Mrs. Harriet Thorpe of Houston, Tex., Mrs. Mary Coryn of New York City, and Mrs. Melba Schneider of Tipp City, Ohio; a step-daughter, Mrs. Norma Cain, of Ansonia; five grandchildren, one step-grandchild, one sister, one half-brother and three half-sisters.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 4 p. m. at the Ansonia Christian church with Rev. Noble Schlechty and Rev. A. R. Norris officiating. Burial will be in Teegarden cemetery. Friends may call at the Fisher funeral home in Ansonia after 5 p. m. Friday. The body will lie in state at the church from 1 to 4 p. m. Sunday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 15, 1944

Brief Illness Proves Fatal To Mrs. B. D. Young.

Mrs. Byron D. Young, 20, of Union City, died at the Randolph County hospital Friday at 6:40 p. m. after an illness of two days from a kidney ailment.

She was formerly Miss Joanne L. Mason, daughter of Melvin and Cora Mays Mason of 406 S. Columbia street and was born in Union City July 23, 1924. She was graduated from the West Side high school in 1942. On July 5 of that year she was married to Byron D. Young, now a staff sergeant in the United States Army in Italy.

She was formerly employed by the Hobart Mfg. Co. of Troy, Ohio and the Standard Cash Register company of Dayton, Ohio.

She was a member of the Methodist church of Union City.

Surviving besides the husband and the parents are one brother, Staff Sergeant Russell A. Mason of Bergstrom Field, Austin, Texas, two sisters, Miss Glenna Mason of Dayton and Miss Dorothy Mason at home.

The body is at the Brooks funeral home in Union City. Funeral plans are not complete.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 15, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Grace Gentner Turner, widow of the late Franklin A. Turner, died in Waterloo, Iowa, July 12, after an extended illness. She was born and reared at Woodington, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Francis M. Gentner, and formerly lived in Greenville. Surviving are a son, a grandson, and a brother.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 15, 1944

Parker Man Is Claimed By Death.

Herschel V. Wysong, age 80, resident of Parker, Indiana, died suddenly at his home Thursday morning. He was a member of the Parker Methodist church.

He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Alfred Wayts, of Parker and one granddaughter, Harriet Ellen Wayts also of Parker.

Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p. m. at the Parker Methodist church, with the Rev. E. F. Landrey officiating. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery in Winchester.

The body was returned to the residence from the Perry funeral home Friday where friends may call.

Mr. Wysong was a cousin of Will and Charles Wysong both of Winchester.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 17, 1944

Heart Attack Takes Life Of John R. Holland.

A heart attack which had been developing for several months proved fatal to John Roger Holland, 72, well known farmer, at his home west of Woodington and southeast of Union City Saturday at 5:45 a. m.

A lifelong resident of Darke County, he was born near Woodington Sept. 6, 1871, the son of Charles F. and Maggie Hoke-Holland. He attended the district school and soon engaged in farming which became his life work and in which he was successful.

On Sept. 22, 1916, with Rev. J. M. Replogle officiating, he was married to Miss Catherine Snell who survives him, together with one brother, Harry Holland, of Coletown, Ohio. Mr. Holland was a member of the Woodington Christian church.

Funeral services will be held at the residence Tuesday at 2 p. m. (EWT), with burial in the Greenville cemetery. The body was returned this morning from the Brooks funeral home in Union City to the Holland home were friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 17, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Orpha Bell Goens, 64, wife of Jason Goens and mother of eight children, died suddenly Friday night at her home at 315 Sweitzer street in Greenville from apoplexy. She was a native of Bradford and a lifelong resident of Darke County. Her husband has been an invalid for several years. Surviving besides the husband, are two sons, six daughters, 13 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and three brothers. Funeral services were held at the residence Monday afternoon, with burial in Greenlawn cemetery, Versailles.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 17, 1944

Died --- Abraham L. Brock, 80, native of Darke County, died Friday night at his farm home on Fort Recovery Rural Route Three after an illness of three years. He was born and reared near Arcanum and had been an active farmer for over a half-century. Surviving are the widow, Rachel; one daughter, Mrs. Russell Dennison of Greenville; three sons, Orville of Ft. Recovery, Oscar of Rossburg and Audra, of Ansonia; five grandchildren; two brothers, William of Union City and Jack of Ft. Recovery; one sister Mrs. Emma Miller of Dayton; one foster sister, Mrs. Fannie Briner of New Weston; Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Bethel Evangelical church to which Mr. Brock belonged, with burial in Spring Hill cemetery, Ft. Recovery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 18, 1944

Burial Honors Arranged For Bradford Flyer.

Greenville, July 18 - Full military burial honors will be accorded Staff Sgt. Franklin James Albright, 26, son of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Albright, Bradford, who was among five army men killed in the crash of a twin-engined plane near Chattanooga, Tenn. Last Friday night.

His body arrived in Gettysburg early Monday and was removed to the home of the parents Monday evening.

Services will be held at 2 p. m. Wednesday at the Bradford Methodist church with the Rev. E. A. Leeson officiating. Burial will be at Abbottsville. A guard of honor and firing squad will be sent from Fort Knox, Ky., where Sgt. Albright was stationed.

Among the other victims of the plane crash was Major General Paul W. Neargarder, commander of the Tenth Army Division and two Colonels. The plane, which was out of Fort Knox, exploded in midair during an electrical storm and crashed in an orchard five miles west of Chattanooga.

Sgt. Albright had served in the army air corps since June, 1941, ranking as an aerial engineer. He formerly was employed by the Waco Aircraft Company at Troy.

Besides the father and mother, he leaves a wife, Mrs. Lee Albright, of Louisville, Ky.; two brothers, Sgt. Berman Albright, of El Paso, Texas, and William at home; a sister, Mary Alice, also at home, and three grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Albright and Mrs. Edith Stump, all of Arcanum.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 18, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Olive Leona Lutz, 72, wife of Jacob Lutz, retired Greenville barber, died Saturday evening at her home at 308 North Main street, Greenville, after an extended illness. She had lived most of her life in Greenville and was a member of St. Paul's Evangelical and Reformed church. Besides the husband she leave one sister and three brothers. Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at the Stocker funeral home in Greenville, with burial in Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 18, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Luella Roberson, 75, wife of Wilson Roberson, retired farmer, died suddenly Saturday night from heart attack at her home in Ithaca. Surviving besides the husband are one son, six grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, one brother and one sister. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Ithaca U. B. church, with burial in the Ithaca cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 18, 1944

Died --- Philip N. Deem, 78, retired farmer who lived with his son, Fred, in Greenville, died Monday at the Wayne hospital after a lingering illness. Surviving are two sons, one daughter, eight grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, one foster grandchild, one brother and a sister. Funeral services will be held at the Stocker funeral home Thursday at 2 p. m., with burial in Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 18, 1944

Dies In St. Marys.

Mrs. Charles Schneider of Union City has received word of the death of her mother, Mrs. Augusta Rhynard, 89, at the home of another daughter, Mrs. Grover Smith, in St. Marys, Ohio, after an illness of three weeks. Mrs. Rhynard has frequently visited in Union City. Other surviving daughters include Mrs. Catherine Reiher and Mrs. Emma Botkin of St. Marys; Mrs. Roll Werts of Cleveland; and a daughter, Hattie, of Brooklyn, N. Y. There are 10 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at St. Marys. S-2-c Charles Schneider of Great Lakes Naval Training Station is at home on leave for the funeral.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 18, 1944

Towne Funeral Rites Tuesday.

Miss Iva Towne, 45, died at the Randolph County hospital Sunday evening following a short illness.

She is the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Towne and leaves surviving her four brothers, Charles and Clyde of Muncie, Fay of Union City, and Donald of Winchester.

Funeral services will be held at 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the Fraze Funeral home in Winchester with Rev. Elvin Thornburg officiating. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 19, 1944

Thresher Wheels Crush Farm Boy Near Greenville.

Greenville, July 19 - A thirteen-year-old Darke County farm boy was almost instantly killed at eleven a. m. Tuesday when he fell beneath the wheels of a threshing machine his father was operating.

Victim of the accident was Doyle Seman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harley Seman, who reside on Greenville R. R. 2 seven miles east of this city.

The machine was a grain separator which the father was taking to the home of a neighbor, Omer Vicroy, to assist with the wheat harvest.

His son was riding on the front of the separator and was talking with a neighbor boy, who was riding a bicycle, when he accidentally slipped and fell under the wheels.

The father rushed the boy to the Wayne hospital here, but attendants report that he was dead upon arrival.

Death was attributed to a crushed chest and other internal injuries.

The accident occurred on a rural road almost directly in front of the H. M. Johnson farm, which adjoins the Seman place.

The Seman boy was among eighth grade graduates at the Oakland school last May and planned to enter high school this fall.

Besides the father and mother, he leaves a sister, Joan, 11, at home, and three grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Clasner, of 215 Warren street, Greenville, and Mrs. Richard Hayes, of Stelvideo.

The boy's body has been removed to the Miller Brothers funeral home, Gettysburg, but no definite funeral arrangements have been completed.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 19, 1944

Sarah E. Warren Dies At Home In Saratoga.

Sarah E. Warren, 91, died Tuesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Flossie Coggeshall in Saratoga, Indiana.

She leaves her three children, Flossie Coggeshall, at whose home she died, Don C. Warren, Manhattan, Kansas, and Ross D. Warren, of East Chicago, Indiana, and one step-son, Duke Warren, of Saratoga, Indiana.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Saratoga Methodist church; burial will be in the Saratoga cemetery

The body was taken to the Middleton Funeral home in Ridgeville and will be returned to the home Wednesday morning where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 19, 1944

Charles Arnold Drowns In Pit West Of Lynn.

Charles Emerson Arnold, 18 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Arnold of four miles north of Lynn, drowned while swimming in the gravel pit on the farm of Earl Skinner Monday evening.

His friend and companion, James Johnson of near Lynn, who as unable to rescue Charles, called for assistance. It was necessary for Randolph County Sheriff Kora Davis and Deputy Lester Puterbaugh to drag the pit to recover the body. Artificial respiration applied for an hour failed to revive him.

Survivors include the parents and two brothers, Clinton of Modoc and Orville at home.

Funeral services will be held Thursday at 2 p. m. at the Rural church with Rev. Marcel Thornburg in charge. Burial will be in the Salem cemetery near Modoc.

Friends may call at the Thomas funeral home in Lynn until 1:30 p. m. Thursday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 19, 1944

Found Hanging In Stock Barn.

Jess Hathaway, 60, well known plumbing contractor of Greenville who was formerly employed by the Tibbetts Plumbing and Heating Co. of Union City, was found hanging to a rafter in a stock barn at the Darke County fairgrounds Monday evening. The discovery was made by Frank Vandewater of 712 Sweitzer street who was walking through the grounds. Police officers and Coroner A. F. Sarver took charge of the body, and the latter rendered a verdict of suicide by hanging.

Hathaway was last seen by his wife, Nora, at 10 a. m. when he left his home at 114 Washington Ave. She states that he had been despondent for several weeks because of failing health. He had never fully recovered from a severe attack of pneumonia in April 1943.

He was one of a family of seven children born to George and Emma Hufford-Hathaway in Greenville, and he had spent most of his life in that city. Surviving besides the widow are two brothers, Glen of Youngstown, Ohio, and Carl of Port Huron, Mich., and two sisters, Mrs. Oscar Nelson of Greenville and Mrs. Robert Lehman of Dayton. A daughter, Glenna, preceded him in death.

Funeral services will be held at the Turpen-McKnight funeral home Thursday at 2:30 p. m. with Rev. Philip Hull of the Episcopal church officiating Burial will be in Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 19, 1944

Charles (Bud) Grove, Of Parker, Killed In Action On Invasion Day.

The war struck home again Monday as the War Department sent a brief telegram to Edward Grove, of Parker, stating that his son, Charles (Bud) Grove had been killed in action. The message indicated that the tragedy occurred on D-Day during the invasion of the European continent-possibly on June 6. The wire added that a letter concerning details of his death would follow.

Bud Grove entered the service in January of 1942 and has been stationed in England for more than two years.

Other than the father he is survived by three sisters, Martha and Laura Evelyn Grove of Parker and Juanita Grove of California. A brother, Carl Grove, serving with the armed forces in Texas, also survives.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 20, 1944

Former Resident Dead.

Word had reached Union City of the death of a former resident, Mrs. Olive Harrison Barr, 74, wife of Prof. M. L. Barr, and daughter of Samuel J. Harrison, former well known Union City cigar salesman. Mrs. Barr died at her home at East Orange, N. J., after an illness of two days from heart attack. She was a graduate of the Union City West Side high school and Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio. Surviving her are her husband and a daughter, Miss Mary Margaret Barr, who has recently visited in Union City. Mrs. Barr's body was placed in the Policy mausoleum at Portland, Ind.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 20, 1944

Memorial Service For Sgt. John Evans.

Sunday at 4 p. m. in the first United Brethren church at 11th and B streets in Richmond a memorial service was held for Tech. Sgt. John A. Evans, son of C. B. Evans, who formerly lived with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Boggs, south of Union City, and who was killed in action in Italy March 31, 1944.

As part of the memorial service a service flag for the church with 81 stars was dedicated. The star for Sgt. Evans is the only gold star. Each star has the name of the service man or woman it represents. Rev. Homer Achor, pastor of the church, delivered a very appropriate memorial address in which he paid high tribute to Sgt. Evans. A male quartet and Mrs. Homer Achor, soloist, with Robert Byrd as organist, provided music of the service which was largely attended.

Those from Union City attending were Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Boggs, Mrs. C. B. Evans, Mrs. John Minnich and son, Randy; Miss Helen Carter and Miss Martha Carter. Other relatives attending included Miss Josephine Read, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mangold and children of Indianapolis; Guy Boggs of Muncie; Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Bennett and family of Saratoga.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 21, 1944

Paralysis Fatal To Third Child In Darke County.

A third death is reported among the infantile paralysis victims in Darke County, and a seventh case has developed. The dead child is Hazel Ann Pence, aged nine years, who was being treated at the Miami Valley hospital in Dayton. She became ill last Sunday and was removed Tuesday evening to the hospital where she died Wednesday evening. Her throat and chest were affected.

Surviving are the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Pence of 754 Central Ave., Greenville; one brother, two sisters and a grandmother. Private funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at the Littleton funeral home in Springfield, Ohio, with burial in Ferncliff cemetery, Springfield.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 22, 1944

Died --- Funeral services for Charles Lawson, 72, retired railroader of Bradford, who dropped dead at his home Thursday, will be held at the residence Sunday at 2 p. m., with burial at Abbottsville. He was formerly a brakeman on the Pennsylvania Railroad. Surviving are the widow and one son. The body was taken to the Miller funeral home in Gettysburg.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 22, 1944

Died --- Oscar L. Shook, 61, Wabash Twp. Farmer, died Thursday evening at his home five miles northeast of Rossburg after several weeks of illness. Surviving are the widow; one daughter, Mrs. Harold Brindley of Greenville; one brother, William Shook, and a half-brother, Archey Shook,of near Rossburg. Funeral services will be held at Shook's Chapel Sunday at 3 p. m., with Rev. Noble Schlechty officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 22, 1944

Died --- The remains of Lon Burk, formerly of Greenville, who died in Chicago, July 9, have been cremated. The ashes have been brought to the home of a brother, Allen Burk, at 325 Plum street in Greenville where memorial services will be held Sunday at 2 p. m., with interment at Abbottsville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 22, 1944

Modoc Boy, Robert William Andrews, Killed In Service Of His Country.

Just before noon today a grief stricken father and mother appeared at the office of this newspaper and reported another tragic communique from World War two. Thursday morning at 9 a. m. the saddened parents, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Andrews of Modoc route one received a telegram from the War Department stating that their son, Pfc. Robert William Andrews, had been killed in the Norman Invasion. The wire was brief and did not give any details of the death.

Private Andrews entered the service in November of 1941 and completed his basic training at Camp Croft, South Carolina.

Andrews had been stationed in England for more than two years. On April 29 of this year he married an English girl.

He graduated from McKinley High School with the class of 1939.

There will be a short Memorial Service at the Union Chapel church Sunday noon.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 22, 1944

Died --- Isaac T. Dill, 87, retired farmer, of Palestine, died Thursday night at Reid Memorial hospital, Richmond, after a brief illness. He had lived in or near Palestine for 60 years and was a member of the K. of P. lodge. Surviving are three sons, three daughters, 23 grandchildren including four in the armed forces,29 great-grandchildren, and one sister. Funeral services will be held at the Miller funeral home in Greenville Sunday at 2:30 p. m., with burial in Ft. Jefferson cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that he was born Dec. 25, 1856 in Preble Co., OH, the son of Michael Dill (b. Maryland) and Rachel Henderson. His wife was Anna Dill. His three sons were Omar, of Palestine; William, of Camden, OH; and Deo, of Eaton, OH. His three daughters were Mrs. Allen Koons of New Madison, OH; Mrs. Pierce Spencer of Greenville, OH and Mrs. Earnest Troutwine of New Madison, OH. His sister was Mrs. Margaret Dixon of Coletown, OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 22, 1944

Died --- Funeral services for George Ruh, 81, retired farmer, who died Wednesday night at his home in Ansonia, were held Saturday afternoon at the residence, with burial in Greenville cemetery. Ruh had lived in Ansonia for 31 years. Surviving are the widow, Tollie; one daughter, Mrs. Maud Ault, of Ansonia; three sons, Earl of Ansonia, Harry J. of Detroit and E. L. of Red Bank, N. J.; four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, one brother and one sister.

[Oliver Funeral Home Records state that he was born Sept. 4, 1862 in Lexington, OH, the son of Anton Ruh and Barbara Rinck (both b. in Germany).]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 24, 1944

Aged Pioneer Called To Rest After Long Life.

Mrs. Barbara Ellen Burk, 86, one of the oldest and most highly respected resident of Wayne Township, came to the end of life's journey at 12:15 a. m. Saturday at her home three miles southwest of Union City. She had been in declining health for several months. A fall at her home a few weeks ago hastened her demise.

Mrs. Burk was one of 14 children born to John and Sarah Dixon-Price, sturdy pioneers who lived three and one-half miles southwest of Union City on what is now Highway 32. Of the large family only two now remain, John R. Price of Union City and George Price of Parker, Ind. The date of her birth was May 1, 1858 three years before the opening of the Civil War.

Barbara Ellen attended the Harrisville school. On Feb. 27, 1874, a few days before her 16th birthday, she was married at the Price home to William D. Burk, member of another pioneer family of the community. For 67 years they fought life's battles together till Mr. Burk's death in 1941. They lived for more than 60 years on the same farm.

Mrs. Burk became the mother of 13 children of whom she reared 11 to adulthood. One son, Raymond, died in infancy, and one daughter, Rosa, died at the age of two and one-half years. The others reached the years of manhood and womanhood, but the following preceded the mother in death: William and John Burk, Mrs. John Crim, Mrs. Claud Thornburg and Mrs. Frank Davis.

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Forrest C. Yoder of northeast of Union City; Mrs. Virgil Fertig and Mrs. Fred Snook of Union City; three sons, Artie, who cared for his mother in her last years; Ollie and Elmer, all of southwest of Union City. Surviving also besides the two brothers are 30 grandchildren, 72 great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren, total 118.

Mrs. Burk's life was characterized by untiring industry and deep devotion to her large family. She attended the South Salem Christian church and was for several years a member of Naomi Rebekah Lodge No. 12 in Union City. She was justly proud of the contribution being made by her family to the war effort in agriculture, industry, and in the armed services. Thirteen of her grandsons and great grandsons are now in the armed services of the United States. One grandson, Pfc. Howard O. Yoder, 26, was killed in action June 13 during the invasion of France, and another grandson, Pfc. Edward L. Burk, 22, has been missing in Italy since Jan. 31. It is doubtful if this family record is surpassed anywhere in this section of country.

Funeral services for Mrs. Burk were held at the residence at 2:30 this afternoon, with Rev. John A. Watson officiating. Burial was in the Union City cemetery. A large number of people called at the Burk home after the body was returned from the Fraze funeral home Sunday evening.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 24, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Margaret Bucher, 73, widow of John Bucher, died from cerebral hemorrhage Friday at her home in Arcanum. A lifelong resident of Arcanum, she was active in the Eastern Star. Surviving are three brothers. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Stutz and Sando funeral home in Arcanum, with burial at Abbottsville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 24, 1944

Died - Charles L. Brandon, 60, farmer, of west of Versailles, died Saturday in the Wayne hospital at Greenville after 12 years of failing health. Surviving are the widow, three sons and one sisters. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Christian church in Versailles, with burial at Beamsville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 24, 1944

Death Calls Blanche Flatter At Age Of 36.

Miss Blanche Flatter, 36, daughter of Albert Flatter, died Saturday at 2 p. m. at her home near Spring Hill six miles southeast of Union City after several months of declining health caused by an attack of influenza.

She had lived her entire life in that community except while attending a state school at Columbus, Ohio, from which she was graduated. Her mother, formerly Miss Edith Warshier, died in 1932, and she kept house for her father. She attended the Methodist church at Union City.

Surviving are the father, Albert Flatter, one sister, Mrs. Clifford O'Dell, of Gordon, Ohio; and a host of friends who admired Miss Flatter's character, her cheerfulness and her ambition to fill a useful place in life despite discouragement.

Funeral services will be held at the Fraze funeral home in Union City Tuesday at 1 p. m. (CWT), with Rev. E. E. Kaufman of the Methodist church officiating. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home until the hour of the services.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 24, 1944

William Peden At Farm Home Breaths Last.

William Peden, 77, well known farmer, died Sunday at 3:30 a. m. at his home near North Salem nine miles northwest of Union City, after three years of failing health and three weeks of serious illness. He had lived his entire life in the North Salem community with the exception of 19 years near Kinsman, Ohio.

He was born near North Salem, May 6, 1867, the son of Thomas and Martha Baker-Peden. He attended the district school in Jackson Twp. and engaged in farming at an early age. On March 10, 1888, he was married to Miss Anna Cline who survives him, together with the following sons and daughters: Melvin Peden of Bellefontaine; Fred and Virgil Peden of Kinsman, Ohio; Mrs. Harry Rhoades of North Kinsman. Surviving also are 13 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; two brothers, Alex Peden of north of Union City and Thomas V. Peden of near North Salem.

Mr. Peden was a successful farmer over a long period, was a useful citizen of the community, and an active, faithful member of the Pleasant Hill Christian church where final services will be held Tuesday at 2 p. m., with Rev. John A. Watson officiating. Burial will be in Lisbon cemetery The body was returned this afternoon from the Williamson funeral home in Portland to the Peden residence where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 24, 1944

H. C. Maxwell, Of Farmland, Fatally Injured.

Howard C. Maxwell, 61, of three miles northwest of Farmland, died at 5:50 o'clock Friday morning in Ball hospital, Muncie, of injury sustained in an accident yesterday at the Indiana Steel and Wire Company plant, Muncie.

A small piece of wire had penetrated his skull and entered the brain, doctors said. Fellow employes found him leaning against a machine, holding his head, from which blood flowed. He was unable to tell them what had happened.

Surviving are the widow, Leona; one daughter, Mrs. Wilbur Harlan of Lynn; one son, Robert of Farmland; and one sister, Mrs. E. H. Elliott, of Lynn.

Funeral services will be held at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Thornburg mortuary. Burial will be in the Fountain Park cemetery. The body will remain at the mortuary until after the services.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 24, 1944

Farmland Man Dies At Home, Burial Sunday.

William Beckley, age 64, died at his home in Farmland Thursday. Mr. Beckley has resided in Farmland for forty years and was agent and telegraph operator there for more than twenty years.

He leaves his wife, Jeanette; one son, Lee Beckley, of Muncie; and one daughter, Mrs. S. E. Carruth, of Terre Haute, Indiana.

The body was removed to the Thornburg funeral home. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 p. m. Sunday afternoon at the Christian church in Farmland, with Rev. A. M. Thomas officiating and Rev. Dee Henderson assisting. Burial will be in Woodlawn cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 25, 1944

Lieut. Barry Reported Killed.

Greenville, July 25 -- The war department has notified Mrs. Bettie Curtis Bary, 316 Devor street, Greenville, that her husband, First Lt. Thomas R. Barry, 26, was killed in action in France June 20.

No details were disclosed but the telegram stated that a letter follows.

Lt. Barry was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Barry, 211 Central Avenue, this city. His father is chairman of the Darke County war price and rationing board.

He enlisted in the army on March 11, 1941, and graduated from an Officers Candidate School at Fort Benning, Ga., in December, 1942. Assigned to active duty with an infantry regiment he was sent overseas last January.

A graduate of Greenville high school in the class of 1936, he later attended both Ohio State University and Ohio University at Athens, specializing in journalism. At the time he entered military service he was employed in the advertising department of the Dayton Daily News.

Shortly after "D-Day," Dayton newspapers revealed that he was one of the first Miami Valley boys to land in France with American invasion forces.

His wife, the former Bettie Curtis, is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Curtis, Washington Avenue and Sherman street, Greenville. They were married on October 27, 1941, and have one child, a six-month-old son, Bruce, whom the father had never seen. A daughter, Beverly Ann, preceded him in death.

Besides the wife, parents and infant son, he leaves a brother, Joseph, of Manitowac, Wisconsin, and a sister, Bernadine, at home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 25, 1944

Former Resident Dies In West, Burial Saturday.

Francis H. McFarland died Monday in Madera, California. Mr. McFarland formerly lived near Saratoga and had retired from farming and gone to his daughter's in California.

He leaves one son, Francis Earl McFarland, of Indianapolis, and three daughters, Mamie McFarland, Ekina McFarland and Ica McFarland, of Madera, California.

The body will arrive in Winchester Friday evening at 7:55 p. m. and will be taken to the Fraze funeral home where friends may call until the hour of the services.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 2 p. m. at the Saratoga U. B. church. Burial will be in the Saratoga Odd Fellows cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 25, 1944

Mrs. Flora Owens Dies Sunday At County Home.

Mrs. Flora Owens, age 79, widow of the late Elias Owens, passed away Sunday at 5:30 p. m. in the Randolph County hospital following an illness of four weeks. She was a life-long resident of Randolph County and had lived in Winchester for ten years.

She leaves three sons, Charles and Harry of near Winchester, and Homer of Huntsville, and two daughters, Mrs. Leon Wasler and Mrs. Orville Kolp of near Winchester, seventeen grandchildren and 23 great grandchildren.

The body will be removed to the residence of the daughter, Mrs. Leon Wasler, from the Maynard & Walker mortuary at 6 p. m. Monday, where friends may call.

Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p. m. Wednesday afternoon, at the Winchester Nazarene church in charge of Rev. Walter Greek of Lynn, assisted by Rev. M. B. Harold. Interment will be in the Buena Vista cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, July 25, 1944

Farmland Man Dies At Home, Rites Tuesday.

William Bonshire, 71, died Sunday afternoon at 5 p. m. at his home in Farmland after a brief illness.

Surviving are the widow, Edna, two children, Mrs. Vera Derby and George Bonshire of Mich., two brothers, John Bonshire of San Francisco, Calif., Jake Bonshire of Williamstown, W. Va., and three grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Thornburg funeral home and will be returned to the home in Farmland Monday evening at 5 p. m. where friends may call.

Funeral services will beheld Tuesday at 3 p. m. at the residence with Rev. Dee Henderson officiating.

Burial will be in the Buena Vista cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 26, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Thelma Williams Ramsey, 35, formerly of Greenville, who moved to California last spring, died Sunday at Los Angeles after a lingering illness. She and her husband, Carey, who survives, formerly operated the Marianna apartments on Monument Ave., Dayton. The body will be brought to the Miller funeral home in Greenville Thursday evening where funeral services will be held Saturday at 2:30 p. m., with burial in Greenville cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that Thelma Blossom Ramsey was born June 5, 1909 in Greenville, OH, the daughter of William E. Williams (b. Greenville, OH) and Delia Shepard (b. Arcanum, OH).]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 26, 1944

Robert Heaton, Winchester R. R., Killed In The Invasion Of France.

In a telegram received Monday from the War Department by Mrs. Robert Heaton, Rural Route, Winchester, Indiana, it was disclosed that another tragic World War II casualty had touched Randolph County when Private Robert Heston, age 26, was killed on June 20, 1944, in the service of his country, in the invasion of France.

Private Heaton entered the service on November 5, 1943, and obtained his basic training at Camp Wheeler, Georgia.

He attended the Lynn high school. Before entering the service he was employed by the Overmyer Mould company, in Winchester. Prior to his employment at Overmyer's he was employed at the Winchester Stock yards.

Private Heaton leaves his wife, Mildred (Rich); his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Heaton; two brothers, Denzil and Franklin; two sisters, Mary Rose Heaton and Mrs. Virginia Frazier; the grandmother, Mrs. Lillie Brooks or Burke; and an aunt, Mrs. Olive Moore.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, July 26, 1944

Leander Lykins Dies At Home, Rites Thursday.

Leander Lykins, 77, died at his residence three miles south of Winchester at 7 a. m. Tuesday following a lingering illness.

Surviving are one brother, Enos Lykins of Winchester, two sisters, Mrs. Ida Leaver of Portland and Mrs. Emma Retz of Winchester. Also several nieces and nephews.

The body was removed to the Maynard and Walker funeral home where services will be held Thursday at 2 p. m.

Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 27, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Casandra Ruan Riegle, 83, widow of Charles A. Riegle, died Wednesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry Albright, east of Jaysville, after three weeks of serious illness. She formerly lived near Weaver's Station. Surviving are one son; six daughters including Mrs. Susan Schlechty of New Paris, O.; 29 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Friday at 2:30 p. m. at the Abbottsville church, with Rev. O. O. Arnold officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that she was born March 20, 1861 in Montgomery Co., OH, the daughter of Henry Shivadecker (b. PA) and Lavina Wysong (b. Montgomery Co., OH). Her one son was Ollie Riegle of New Madison, OH; her six daughters were Mrs. Pearl Godown, Greenville, OH, Mrs. Bertha Oaks, Pitsburg, OH, Mrs. Lucy Taylor, London, OH, Mrs. Noble Schlechty, New Paris, OH, Mrs. Hazel Hawkey, Eldorado, OH, and Mrs. Harry Albright, Greenville, OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 27, 1944

Died --- Shelly Pantle, 53, son of the late Rev. J. A. Pantle of Greenville, died Tuesday night at Powers Station, Ind., after an extended illness. He formerly lived in Darke County where he was well known. Funeral services will be held at Powers Station Friday at 1 p. m.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, July 27, 1944

Roy L. Whiteman, Fourth County Boy Within Week, Killed In France.

In a telegram received Tuesday by Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. M. Whiteman, Rural Route 4, Winchester, Indiana, it was disclosed that their son, Pfc. Roy L. Whiteman, had been killed in action on July 5, 1944, in France.

Pfc Whiteman entered the service on October 27, 1942, and received his basic training at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. From Camp Atterbury he was sent to Camp Breckenridge, Ky.; from Camp Breckenridge he was shipped overseas on April 7, 1944.

Roy attended the Pennville high school, at Pennville, Indiana, and graduated from there in 1936. Prior to his induction into the armed forces he was employed by the Miller Machine shop in Portland, Indiana.

On January 4, 1942, he was married to Ruth Dean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Dean, Rural Route, Ridgeville, Indiana.

He leaves his wife, Ruth Whiteman; the parents, Ernest J. M. and Mary A. Whiteman; one brother, Orange R., of Albany, Indiana; four sisters, Mrs. Opal Fowler, of Route 4, Winchester, and Vera, Marie, and Jean, all at home; and one grandmother, Mrs. Charles Bragg, of Portland, Indiana. One brother, Clyde, preceded him in death.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 28, 1944

Mrs. Sol Ingle Loses Long Fight Against Disease.

After four years of invalidism, with attendant patient suffering, and one week of critical illness, Mrs. Sol Ingle gave up the long, gallant fight at 5 a. m. today at her home in Harrisville.

Mrs. Ingle, who was formerly Miss Bessie May Fortenbaugh, was born in Harrisville Sept. 8, 1877, the daughter of John B. Fortenbaugh of Pennsylvania, well known contractor, and Miss Martha Whitesell of Wayne Township. She lived her entire life of 66 years in Harrisville and attended Harrisville school.

She was active in the work of the Harrisville Christian church and the Ladies' Aid Society. She assisted also in the music of the church. She was likewise active in the work of the Ladies of the Golden Eagle in Harrisville and in the state, having served in the offices of the local lodge and as Grand Templar in the state. She was a interested member of the Wayne Home Economics Club. In all of these she rendered useful service which was ended only when ill health came upon her.

On Sept. 10, 1898, she was married to Sol Ingle of Harrisville, who survives her, together with three sons; John F. Ingle of San Gabriel, Cal.; Gerald and Max L. Ingle, both of Harrisville. Surviving also are three grandchildren and one sister, Mrs. Clyde Shultz, of near Harrisville. Besides these are a host of friends who held Mrs. Ingle in highest esteem because of her deep devotion to her family, her unswerving loyalty to her friends, and her unselfish service in the religious, educational and social life of the community.

The body is at the Fraze funeral home in Union City. Funeral plans will not be completed until word is received from the son in California.

[Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Harrisville Christian church with Rev. John A. Watson officiating. Burial was made in the Union City cemetery.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 28, 1944

Everett Keys, World War I Veteran, Dies.

Word has been received here of the death of Everett Keys. He died at the Veterans' hospital in Hines, Illinois, following a long illness.

Mr. Keys is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Simeon Keys of Winchester. He leaves two sisters, Mrs. Gertrude Cummings of San Antonio, Texas, and Mrs. India Ross of Winchester. Mr. Keys was a veteran of World War I.

The body will be removed to the Fraze funeral home in Winchester. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

[Funeral services were held at the funeral home on Sunday afternoon in charge of Rev. Jacob Frazier. Interment was made in the Fountain Park cemetery.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 28, 1944

Death Claims Lynn Woman, Rites Saturday.

Cornelia A. Johnson, age 87, passed away at her home in Lynn at 12:30 a. m. Thursday morning after several months of ill health.

She leaves two daughters, Mrs. James Isenbarger of Lynn, and Mrs. Claude Munson of Long Beach, California; one son, Fran C. Johnson of Richmond; three sisters, Mrs. E. B. Johnson of Lynn, Mrs. W. E. Hinshaw and Mrs. J. C. Chamberlain, both of Long Beach, California; eleven grandchildren, twelve great grandchildren and three great great grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Thomas funeral home in Lynn in charge of Rev. Zelma Mills. Burial will be in the Arba cemetery.

Friends may call at the funeral home after 6 p. m. Thursday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 28, 1944

Died --- Charles I. Wagner, 67, farmer, who lived alone, was found dead in bed Wednesday afternoon at his home two miles east of Arcanum by two brothers and his farm tenant. It is believed that he was stricken with a heart attack soon after retiring Tuesday night. Surviving besides the two brothers are a son and two sisters. Funeral services will be held at the residence Saturday at 2 p. m., with burial at Abbottsville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, July 28, 1944

Sgt. Crawford Gives Young Life In Distant Land.

The first death message regarding a member of the United States armed services who went into the service while living in Union City, Ind., came yesterday morning to Mrs. Alva Crawford of 218 South Walnut street in Union City, and was as follows:

"The Secretary of War desires me to express his deep regret that your son, Staff Sergeant Robert L. Crawford, was killed in action on June thirty in France. Letter follows. Signed, ULIO, the Adjutant General."

Except for some kind neighbors and friends, the mother bravely bore the terrible news alone for several hours. The father, who has worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. for many years, did not reach home till evening, and the other children of the family were out of the city.

Sgt. Crawford was born Nov. 9, 1919, at 218 South Walnut street which was his home until he left for army service. His parents are Alva and Mary Keagy-Crawford. He attended the West Side school, finishing the grades and about half of the high school when he accepted employment with the Union City Gazette under the late Ray Meredith when the paper was founded in 1934. Starting as a carrier boy, he learned to do nearly everything connected with the paper, which later became the Times-Gazette including composition, proof-reading, editorial work and distribution. His future in the journalistic field was indeed bright. His work brought him in contact with the Winchester papers also, the News and Journal-Herald.

Entering the military service in December 1941, the month of the attack on Pearl Harbor, he received his training at Camp Croft, S. C., Camp Polk, La., Camp Picket, Va., and Indiantown Gap, Pa. His last visit home was in June 1943, and he went overseas soon after that time. He was a member of Co. G, 36th U. S. Armored Regiment, one of the units actively engaged in the invasion of France which began June 6, 1944. His last letter dated June 16 does not state his location or his activities, but his reported death on June 30, according to the message from the War Department, clearly indicates that in a strange land, 3,000 miles from home, he gave his bright, promising young life "in performance of his duty, in defense of his country." No higher tribute can be paid to any American.

Back in the Union City community besides the parents are five sisters: Mrs. Vivian Schlechty of Winchester Rural Route Four, Louise, Annetta, Helen and Yvonne at home; and six brothers, Sherman, Clarence, Thomas, Jack, Ted and Alva, Jr. These have the deepest sympathy of a host of friends, for everyone who knew "Bob" is indeed a friend.

The report of the death of Staff Sergeant Crawford comes to the Times-Gazette with almost tragic force. He grew up with the paper, and was an important part of it for seven years. In our office service flag his is the first star to turn to gold. Because of his quiet, reserved, friendly manner, his kindness to his own family and to all others with whom he came in contact, he was a favorite with the officers and employs of the publishing company. He was industrious, capable, manly, dependable, eager to accept responsibility and to give his best effort to every task. He was a young man of highest character, exemplary habits and high ideals which led him constantly forward to an honest effort to develop his talents to the fullest possible extent and to render useful service to those about him. His life of 24 brief years has not gone out - it has gone on.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 3, 1944

War Department Confirms Death Of Sgt. Crawford.

Mrs. Alva Crawford of 218 South Walnut street, Union City, has received the following letter from the War Department, Office of the Adjutant General under date of July 28:

"It is with regret that I am writing to confirm the resent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Staff Sergeant Robert L. Crawford, 35,171,538, Infantry, who was killed in action on June 30, 1944 in France.

"I fully understand your desire to learn as much as possible regarding the circumstances leading to his death, and I wish that there were more information available to give you. Unfortunately, reports of this nature contain only the briefest details, as they are prepared under battle conditions and the means of transmission are limited.

"I know the sorrow this message has brought you, and it is my hope that in time the knowledge of his heroic service to his county, even unto death, may be of sustaining comfort to you.

"I extend to you my deepest sympathy."

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 29, 1944

Greenville Soldier Loses Life In Italy.

Mr. and Mrs. Cleo Beasecker of 315 West Water street, Greenville, have received word from the War Department that their son, Pvt. Robert Beasecker, 19, reported missing in action on May 27 on the Italian front, met his death on that date. The message gave no details, but said that a letter would follow.

Pvt. Beasecker, who was employed in the composing room of the Greenville Advocate before his induction into the Army on March 11, 1943, went overseas in January 1944, and has served for the past five months in an infantry detachment of the Fifth Army in Italy.

Surviving besides the parents are two brothers, True and J. B. Beasecker, both at home, and two sisters, Mrs. Imogene Holderman of Mississippi and Miss Caroline Beasecker who is at home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, July 29, 1944

Rosa B. Wall Dies At Home, Rites Sunday.

Mrs. Rosa B. Wall, age 73, wife of Palmer Wall, passed away at her home in Parker Friday morning after a lingering illness. She was a member of the Saratoga Methodist church.

Besides the husband she leaves two daughters, Mrs. Herbert R. Botkin of Muncie, and Mrs. Russell Bales of Parker; one sister, Mrs. Margaret Wall of Ridgeville; one brother, William F. St. John of Winchester; two grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Perry funeral chapel in Parker where friends may call at any time.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p. m. at the funeral home, with Rev. E. F. Landrey officiating.

Interment will be in the Maxville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 31, 1944

Killed In Action.

Sgt. Ohmer Strawser of Arcanum has been reported killed in action in France on June 26, according to word received from the War Department by the wife, Mrs. Naomi Strawser, now living in Dayton. Sgt. Strawser, who attended the Arcanum high school and formerly worked for the Di-Mold Co. at Dayton, was inducted into service July 16, 1942, and has been overseas since last February. Besides the widow hie leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Strawser, of West Manchester, Ohio; one brother and two sisters.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, July 31, 1944

Former Resident Dies At East St. Louis Home.

Word has been received in Union City of the death of William A. Hart, 63, former resident here, at his home at 2 Weinel Drive in East St. Louis, Ill., on Friday. Funeral services were held Monday at 1:30 p. m., with burial at East St. Louis.

Mr. Hart, brother of the late Supt. O. F. Hart, was born east of Hillgrove, southeast of Union City, in Darke County, Ohio. His parents were Levi and Elizabeth Loy Hart. He taught school in Washington Twp., and later at Botkins and Anna, Ohio. He became connected with the Goodyear Rubber Co., and for many years was secretary and treasurer of the Midwest Rubber Reclaiming Co. of East St. Louis.

Surviving are the widow, Rose; three daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth Guyer, Mrs. Gertrude Richard and Mrs. Doris Haupt, all of Akron, Ohio; three sons, George of Seymour, Ind., Charles of East St. Louis, Ill. and William A. Hart, Jr. of Detroit. One sister, Mrs. Allie Robison, lives southeast of Union City. One brother, Joseph, lives at Lightsville, Ohio, and another brother, Jacob O. Hart, lives at New Paris, Ohio. There are 13 grandchildren.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Wounds Fatal To Pfc. L. Shifflet On French Front.

Monday afternoon Mr. and Ms. William Shifflet of North Salem, nine miles northwest of Union City received the following telegram from the Adjutant General at Washington, D. C.

"The Secretary of War asks that I assure you of his deep sympathy in the loss of your son, Private First Class Lyle P. Shifflet. The report received states that he died July 5 in France as the result of wounds received in action. Letter follows."

This message brought a great shock to the family and to the North Salem, Ansonia and Union City communities. In his last letter dated June 27 Pfc. Shifflet told his parents little concerning the war, and suggested that they read the newspapers carefully for the details. He made no reference to the invasion of France in which he was taking part. His final visit home was last Christmas.

Pfc. Shifflet was born in Holder, Ill., Feb. 26, 1909, making his age 35 years and five months. In 1919 he came with his parents, William and Ella Perkins-Shifflet, and other member of the family, to Elroy, Darke County, Ohio, east of Union City. While there he attended the Jackson, Ohio, school. In 1923 the family moved to North Salem where he assisted his father in operating the general store. In 1927 he was graduated from the Madison high school north of North Salem.

In 1940 he and his brother, Irven, acquired a store in Ansonia, Ohio, known as the Home Store, William Shifflet & Son, which the two brothers operated until the younger entered military service on June 15, 1942, from Jay County, Ind., where he had registered. He received his training at Camp Pickett, Va., Camp Blanding, Fla., Camp Forrest, Tenn., Camp Lagoona, Ariz., and Camp Phillis, Kansas. Going overseas the forepart of April, 1944, he landed in England as a member of an infantry unit of the 79th U. S. Division. As a soldier he had an excellent record, and according to the message from the War Department, he gave his life in battle in defense of his country. No higher tribute can be paid to him, no loftier eulogy can be pronounced.

For several years Pfc. Shifflet was secretary of the Jordan I. O. O. F. lodge at North Salem. He was a member of the Union City Christian church, and while living in Ansonia he was secretary-treasurer of the volunteer fire department there. He was successful in business, and was deeply interested in all the worthwhile activities of the community in which he lived. His high character, exemplary habits, kind and courteous manner, and his unselfish desire to be of service to others won for him a host of friends who share with the relatives a genuine sense of loss at this untimely death.

Surviving besides the parents and brother, Irven, of Ansonia, are another brother, Hobart, who is in Phoenix, Ariz., seeking to regain his health lost from the first world war; and one sister, Miss Opal Shifflet, a teacher in Cincinnati. Miss Betty Jean Shifflet of Bunker Hill, Ind., member of the WAVES, is a niece, and Jimmy Shifflet of Phoenix, Ariz. Is a nephew.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Died --- Edward A. Locke, 72, retired farmer, died Monday a his home at Ithaca after a lingering illness. He was a member of the Christian Church at Coletown, of the I. O. O. F. and D. of A. lodges. Surviving are the widow, one son, four daughters, 12 grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and one sister. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 2:30 p. m. at the Ithaca U. B. church, with burial in Ithaca cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Minnie Hile, 67, wife of William Hile, died at her home in Versailles Saturday following a long illness. She was a member of the Versailles Christian Church and Atheneum literary club. Surviving are the husband, one son, one grandson and two sisters. Funeral service were held Monday afternoon in the Christian Church, with burial in Greenlawn cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Pvt. Lee D. Jones, Of Ridgeville, Killed On Norman Front July 12.

Charles Jones of Portland has received word from the War Department that his brother, Pvt. Lee D. Jones, 33, was killed in action in France on July 12. He had been in an infantry unit of the United States Army for five years and received his training at Camp Custer, Mich., at Macon, Ga., at Ft. McClellan, Ala., Camp Butner, N. C., and Camp Pickett, Va. He went overseas in May, 1944. His last letter home was dated June 23.

Pvt. Jones was born in Randolph County June 18, 1912, the son of Douglas and Florence Fergusson-Jones who lived at Ridgeville several years. The mother died 14 years ago. A brother, Edward, also is deceased. Pvt. Jones was formerly employed in the stone quarry at Ridgeville.

Surviving are the father, Douglas Jones, of Ridgeville; the brother, Charles, at Portland; four sisters: Mrs. Kate Brundage, Mrs. Bonnie Hanby and Mrs. May Addington, all of Plainwell, Mich.; and Mrs. Coral Hutchens of Kalamazoo, Mich.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Death Confirmed Of Pfc. Yoder In English Channel.

On July 7 Mrs. Ruby E. Yoder of northeast of Union City received a message from the War Department stating that her husband, Pfc. Howard O. Yoder, 26, was killed in action June 13 in the European Area, and that a letter would follow.

Mrs. Yoder has received the following letter from the Adjutant General confirming the previous message:

"It is with regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your husband, Pfc. Howard O. Yoder, 35,881,460, Quartermaster Corps. Who was killed in action June 13, 1944, in the English Channel.

"I fully understand your desire to learn as much as possible regarding the circumstances leading to his death, and I wish that there were more information available to give you. Unfortunately, reports of this nature, contain only the briefest details, as they are prepared under battle conditions and the meas of transmission are limited.

"I know the sorrow this message has brought you, and it is my hope that in time the knowledge of his heroic service to his country, even unto death, may be of sustaining comfort to you.

"I extend to you my deepest sympathy."

Signed by Adjutant General J. A. Ulio

Mrs. Yoder has received also the following beautiful message dated July 23 from Gen. George C. Marshall, Chief of Staff and commanding general of the U. S. Army:

"General Marshall extends his deepest sympathy in your bereavement. Your husband fought valiantly in a supreme hour of his country's need. His memory will live in the grateful heart of the nation."

Pfc. Yoder, who was a farmer and railroad worker living near the Union City Country Club southeast of the city, entered military service Jan. 3, 1944. After receiving training at Ft. Warren, Cheyenne, Wyo., he went overseas May 1, landing in England My 30. Thus he had been in Europe less than two weeks when death came, probably as his ship was crossing the English Channel in the invasion of France. He had written four letters home, the last dated June 9. Besides his wife he is survived by three small children; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Forrest C. Yoder; four sisters and four brothers.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Pvt. Jack Wymer, Jr., Winchester R. R. 4, Killed In France July 7.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Wymer, rural route 4, Winchester, Indiana, received a telegram Sunday from the War Department stating that their son, Pvt. Jack Wymer, Jr., 19, was killed in action in France on July 7th.

Pvt Wymer entered the services on April 8, 1943, on which date he was sent to Fort Benjamin Harrison. From Fort Harrison he was sent to Fort Lewis, Wash., and from there he was transferred to the New England states and left for overseas duty sometime in January 1944.

Jack attended the McKinley school east of Winchester. He was a member of the Junior Mechanic lodge. Before his induction he was employed by the Anchor-Hocking Glass corporation.

He leaves the father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Wymer; five brothers, John William, who is serving with the United States Navy and whose whereabouts is unknown, and Harry Dale, Max, Richard Noel, and Ralph Philip, all at home; three sisters, Mary Ruth, Carolyn, and Ella Frances, all of whom are at home; one grandfather, John David Wyrick of Paris, Ill., and several aunts and uncles and a host of friends.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Heart Attack Proves Fatal To Harry Robinson.

Harry Robinson, age 68, died suddenly Saturday evening due to a heart attack which he suffered after getting in his car in front of the C. S. Beck grocery.

He was the son of Elwood and Cordella (Bundart) Robinson.

Surviving are the widow, Maude, two daughters, Mrs. Mary C. Hill of South Bend, Mrs. Thanet Davies of Gary, one step-daughter, Mrs. Helen Brock of Middletown, Ohio; three grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs G. F. Chenoweth of Lynn and Mrs. Marvin Thornburg of Winchester.

The body has been removed from the Maynard and Walker funeral home to the residence at 434 East South street where friends may call.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 2:30 p. m. in the Friends church with Rev. Aaron Napier officiating and Rev. G. M. Payne assisting.

Interment will be in the Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 1, 1944

Bert Thornburg Dies At Home, Rites Wednesday.

Bert W. Thornburg, age 59, died at his home 5 miles southeast of Winchester, Sunday evening at 10:30 p. m. following five years of illness.

He was a prominent Randolph county farmer and had resided in the Jericho community all his life, being a member of the Jericho Friends church.

Surviving are the widow, Olive, two sons; Tarleton and Marcell Thornburg both of Union City; one sister, Mrs. Mattie Brumfield, one brother Ernest Thornburg both of Winchester, and four grandchildren.

The body will be remove from the Maynard and Walker funeral home to the residence at 7 p. m. Monday where friends may call.

Funeral services will be held in the Jericho Friends church Wednesday at 2:30 p. m. with Rev. Fred Smith and Rev. Elvin Thornburg in charge.

Burial will be in the Jericho cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 2, 1944

Pfc. O. Robinson Killed In Italy.

Before his induction into the Army on Dec. 19, 1942, a man by the name of Oliver Lewis Robinson worked for the Kemper Furniture Co. in Union City. Little was known of him except that he was born at Lexington, Ky., Nov. 12, 1923. He was described as "a jolly good hearted man how made friends easily anywhere he went." He seemed to have no immediate relatives, but for two and one-half years before induction he made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Reier of 639 Pearl street near the Kemper plant.

He was a member of an infantry unit in the army, and he received his training in California. It is not known just when his unit went overseas. Mrs. Reier wrote to him occasionally, and he answered her letters. His last letter was dated Naples, Italy, May 31, 1944. Then came a day when one of Mrs. Reier's letters was returned to her containing the words, "Deceased." She inquired of the War Department, and under date of July 28 she received the following letter from the Acting Adjutant General:

"Reference is made to your letter of July 17 in which you request information concerning Private First Class Oliver L. Robinson.

"I regret to inform you that Pfc. Robinson was killed in action June 3, 1944, in Italy. The report received gave no further details. I extend my deep sympathy."

This is the simple story of a man who was little known in his adopted community, and who made the supreme sacrifice without the knowledge or acclaim of the people among whom he lived his humble life. There are many of these in this war, but when the victory is won they, too, will live in the grateful remembrance of the nation which they died to save and of the world which they helped to liberate from tyranny and slavery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 2, 1944

Brief Illness Proves Fatal To C. L. Vermillion

After six days of serious illness from heart attack, Chester L. Vermillion, 59, died at 12:15 p. m. Tuesday at his home at 119 Sycamore street in Union City.

He was born in Darke County, Ohio, Nov. 3, 1884, the son of William F. and Lydia Heckman-Vermillion. He spent his entire life in Darke County except 21 years in Sidney, Ohio. He had lived at his Sycamore street residence for the past nine years and was known as an honorable and useful citizen of the community.

He attended the schools of Darke County. On May 7, 1911, in Union City, he was married to Miss Marie Fry, who survives him, together with one daughter, Mrs. Forrest Hart, of Birmingham, Mich.; three granddaughters and two great-granddaughters.

Mr. Vermillion was a skilled workman in several lines including carpentry, painting and paperhanging. For several years he was in business for himself. During the past few years he was inspector at the Kemper Furniture Co. plant in Union City, a division of the Mengel Co.

He was a devout and faithful member of the Union City United Brethren church where funeral services will be held Friday at 1:30 p. m., with Rev. R. B. Ditmyer, officiating. Burial will be in the cemetery at Greenville, Ohio.

The body was returned this afternoon from the Fraze funeral home in Union City to the Vermillion home where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 2, 1944

Former Resident Dies In Anderson.

Word came to Union City this morning of the death of Miss Margaret Eileen Miller, 23, at her home at 2337 Brown street, in Anderson, Ind., at 7 p. m. Tuesday, after a lingering illness.

She was the daughter of Charles F. Miller, well known New York Central employe. The Miller family formerly lived in Hillgrove and the children attended the Union City, Ohio school.

Surviving are the father: three daughters, Mrs. Eddie Holcomb of Dayton (formerly Miss Sarah Elizabeth Miller), Miss Alice Catherine Miller and Miss Anna Lee Miller, at home; two sons, Captain Glendon Miller of New Caledonia and Lt. Charles Leslie Miller of Detroit.

Mr. and Mrs. W. T. S. Fox of southeast of Union City are the grandparents of Miss Margaret Eileen Miller. There are several other Union City relatives.

Funeral arrangements for Miss Miller have not been completed.

[Funeral services were held on Friday afternoon at the Harold-Rozelle funeral home in Anderson. Interment was made in Memorial Park Cemetery there.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 2, 1944

Died --- Harry R. Brown, 63, treasurer of the American Aggregates Corp. of Greenville, and well-known figure in Midwest business circles, died suddenly Monday night at his home at 232 West Fourth street, Greenville, from heart attack. He was a native of Pleasant Hill and in his earlier years was a baseball pitcher of considerable repute. He was closely associated with the business and civic life of Greenville. Surviving are the widow, a son, a daughter, one sister and three brothers. Funeral services will be held at the residence Thursday at 3 p. m. with Rev. Frank Thomas officiating. Burial will be at Pleasant Hill.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 2, 1944

Died --- William H. Appenzeller, 72, basket maker in Greenville for more than a half-century, died Monday afternoon at his home on the Ft. Jefferson Road after a lingering illness. He learned his trade from his father, Christian Appenzeller, a native of Germany. The widow, a brother and a sister survive. Funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon at the Turpen-McKnight funeral home in Greenville, with burial in the Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 2, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Susella Bennett, 76, widow of Frank Bennett and a former resident of Arcanum, died Monday afternoon in Dayton following a lingering illness. A daughter and three grandchildren survive. Funeral services will be held at the Stutz & Sando funeral home in Arcanum Thursday at 2:30 p. m. with burial at Abbottsville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 3, 1944

Listed as Dead.

Coxswain Harley Alexander, 22, son of Mrs. Ina Alexander-Hoos of New Madison, who was reported missing in June when his ship, the U. S. S. Glennon struck a mine in the English Channel on June 7, is now listed as dead by the Navy Department. He had been in the service for two years and had formerly been employed at the Wayne Works in Richmond. Three brothers are in the armed services and two are at home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 3, 1944

Long Illness Claims Life Of Cledia Hufford.

After three years of ill health which ended his work on Dec. 27, 1943, Cledia L. Hufford, 53, died at his home at 927 West Pearl street, in Union City at 5:52 p. m. Wednesday. The cause of death was heart ailment. He had spent several weeks in the Randolph County hospital at Winchester.

He was born in Darke County, Ohio, near Union City Sept. 22, 1890, the son of William and Loretta Hart-Hufford. After a time the family moved into Randolph County, Ind., west and north west of Union City. He attended the district schools.

On Aug. 12, 1912, he was married to Miss Hazel Fraze at Lisbon with the Rev. W. K. Simmons officiating. Into the family came seven children: Laura Jeanette, now Mrs. Willis Oakman, of St. Johns, Ohio; Tech. Corp. Kenneth Hufford with the American Army in Italy; Pvt. Richard Hufford of Moses Lake, Wash. Two children died in infancy. A daughter, Beatrice, died in 1919 at the age of 19 months and another daughter, Catherine, died in 1923 at the age of eight years. There are four grandchildren. Surviving besides the widow, daughter and two sons are the mother, Mrs. Loretta Hufford; one sister, Mrs. Paul Swaim, of Richmond, Ind.; and a brother Leonard Hufford, of Union City.

Most of Mr. Hufford's active years were spent in factories, principally the Superior Body Co. plant at Lima, Ohio, and the Union City Body Co. plant. As an employe he was industrious, interested and dependable. He was a member of Local 494, C. I. O. of Union City. In manner he was quiet and reserved, yet friendly and companionable, and he leaves a large circle of friends to sympathize with the bereaved family and lament the loss of a good citizen in the community.

The body is at the Fraze funeral home in Union City pending the completion of funeral arrangements.

[Funeral services were held at the funeral home Monday afternoon with Rev. R. B. Ditmyer in charge. Interment was made in the Saratoga cemetery.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 3, 1944

S-Sgt. Fred Mason, Former County Basketball Star, Killed In France.

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Mason of Rural Route 3, Ridgeville, Indiana, received a telegram from the War Department Wednesday morning stating that their son, Staff-Sergeant Fred Mason, had been killed in action July 3 in France. Previously, on Saturday morning, they had received word that he had been wounded in action.

Staff-Sergeant Mason was inducted at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, Indiana, in October, 1942, and from there was transferred to a camouflage camp in North Carolina. He had his only furlough in April, 1943, and was sent overseas sometime in May, 1943.

He was first sent to North Africa and from there he was transferred to Italy; after leaving Italy he went to North Ireland and was sent across the English channel and participated in the invasion of D-Day. He also took part in the siege of Cherbourg. He has seen plenty of action and it may be said that he has not died in vain.

Fred attended the Jefferson high school at Deerfield and graduated with the class of 1940. He was a member of the basketball team for four years and was awarded a basketball trophy in 1940 for good sportsmanship in basketball. He was honest and dependable and a favorite among his classmates. After graduating from high school he attended Purdue university for two years prior to his induction.

He leaves the father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Mason; one brother, Robert Mason, at home, who has served in the army but was discharged until further call; four sisters, Mrs. Martha Ruth Fraze, of Saratoga, Ind.; Mrs. Emma Mitchell, of Muncie, Ind.; Mrs. Marian Swoboda and Mrs. Helen Blosser, both of Cleveland, O.; several aunts and uncles and a great number of friends.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 3, 1944

Local Man Dies In Florida, Rites Friday.

Thomas H. Johnston, age 65, of 229 West South Street, Winchester, Indiana, died Sunday night in Ocala, Florida. He left Winchester some six weeks ago to look after his interests in Florida, suffered a heart attack Sunday night and passed away.

Mr. Johnston was a prominent Randolph County citizen. He farmed in the Martindale community for a number of years, retiring some fourteen years ago and moved to Winchester.

He leaves the widow, Maude, and several nieces and nephews.

The body will arrive in Richmond at 3:25 Thursday afternoon and will be brought to the Maynard & Walker mortuary where friends may call after 7:00 p. m. Thursday.

Funeral services will be held at the mortuary at 2:00 p. m. Friday, with Rev. Elvin Thornburg officiating. Burial will be in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, August 4, 1944

Saben F. Locke Answers Call Of Death Angel

Saben Francis Locke, 75, resident of Union City for the past 24 years, died at 6:40 p. m. Thursday at his home at 802 Central Avenue, Union City, after 18 months of ill health and six weeks of serious illness.

He was born at Coletown, Ohio, March 12, 1869, the son of David and Lavena Locke. He attended the Coletown school. On June 22, 1898, at Greenville, he was married to Miss Minnie Warrell, who survives him, together with two sons and five daughters, as follows: Clarence Locke of Union City and William of Dayton; Mrs. Leona Malloy, Mrs. Margaret Williams and Mrs. Helen Eikenberry, of Union City; Mrs. Cleo Stem of Greenville and Mrs. Eleanor Byrum of Muncie. There are 21 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. Mr. Locke was the last member of his family, with no sisters or brothers.

Mr. Locke, who was a lifelong resident of Ohio, did various kinds of useful work during his lifetime. For several years he was connected with an ice company at Greenville. He was a member of the Union City Church of the Brethren which he attended when physically able and whose teachings he sincerely sought to follow.

The body is at the Fraze funeral home in Union City pending the completion of funeral plans.

[Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Union City Church of the Brethren, with Rev. D. G. Berkebile officiating. Burial was made in the Union City cemetery.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 5, 1944

William Sutton Dies At Home At Lightsville.

William F. Sutton, 76, well known retired farmer of Mississinewa Twp., in Darke County, Ohio, died early Friday at his home at Lightsville northeast of Union City after a lingering illness.

He was a native of Randolph County, Ind., but had spent most of his life in the Lightsville community.

He is survived by his widow, Emma; two sons, Truman and George, of Dayton; five grandchildren; three step-sons, Robert Duey of Gary, Ind., Albert Duey of Troy, Ohio, and Ira Duey of New Weston; two stepdaughters, Mrs. John Oblinger of Dunkirk, Ind., and Mrs. Clarence Lyme of Sidney, Ohio; two sisters, Mrs. Sam Sharp of Union City and Mrs. Olive Peden of Portland, Ind.

Funeral services will be held in the Methodist church at Lightsville Sunday at 3 p. m. with Rev. Noble Schlechty officiating. Burial will be at Ft. Recovery, Ohio. Friends may call at the residence.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 5, 1944

Died --- James H. Noggie, 64, died Thursday noon at the home of a sister, Mrs. Charles Mikesell, in New Madison, following a lingering illness. While born and reared at New Madison, he spent most of his life as a carpenter at Chillicothe, Ohio. Two sisters and one brother survive. Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p. m. at the Stutz and Sando funeral home in New Madison, with burial in Greenmound cemetery.

[Stutz, Sando and Storch Funeral Home Records state that James Horner Noggie was born Aug. 12, 1880 at New Madison, OH, the son of William Noggie and Phoeba Mackey (both b. Darke Co., OH).]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 5, 1944

Died --- Howard C. Siler, 47, Pennsylvania Railroad Co. employe, died Wednesday night at his home in Bradford after an illness of two weeks. Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the home of Mrs. E. B. Mathias in Bradford, with burial in Greenville Creek cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 5, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Bessie Riffle Rhoton, formerly of Greenville, who attained national prominence in politics, died recently at her home at Little Rock, Ark. Wife of a former attorney-general of Arkansas, she served for a time as Democratic national committee woman from that state. Her father, the late J. K. Riffle, was a real estate dealer in Greenville and Darke County. Riffle Avenue in Greenville was named for him.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 7, 1944

Blue Star Has Turned To Gold In Service Flag.

For several months there has been displayed at the farm home of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Bey two and one-half miles east of Union City a service flag with three blue stars set in a background of red and white. Saturday there came into the home a Western Union message which turned one of those blue stars to gold. The tragic sentence for the message from the War Department read, "Your son, Pfc. Vitus Basil Bey, was killed in action in France on July 8, 1944."

Pfc. Bey was born at Versailles, Ohio, Aug. 18, 1923, making his age a few days less than 21. He attended the Versailles and Ansonia schools, and helped with the farm work and other activities. The family moved four years ago to its present location east of Union City on Union City Rural Route Five. He entered the service in October, 1942, and has been overseas since April, 1944. He was a member of the 330th U. S. Infantry, one of the units in the thick of the fight during the invasion of France.

He was a member of St. Mary's Catholic church in Union City. Like other boys of the community, he took his religious faith and belief with him and attended services when the opportunity was offered. His devotion to his country and his desire to serve it in the hour of danger will remain a monument to his memory when the sounds of battle have died away.

Surviving besides the parents are two brothers in the military service Sgt. Paul N. Bey with the Fifth U. S. Army in Italy, and Pvt. Albert Bey who is in New Guinea; three other brothers, Leonard Bey of Sidney, Ohio, Louis and Timothy of Versailles; five sister, Mrs. Don Gates of east of Union City, Miss Blanch Bey of Piqua, Ohio, Mrs. Ernest Rinderle and Mrs. Chalmer Mangen of Versailles, and Mrs. Joe Messaros of New Mexico.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 7, 1944

Robert Geesy Gives Young Life To World Liberty.

The Union City community has been feeling the reality of the war during the past week as it has not felt it before. Another death message came Sunday to Donald Geesy who lives at the west end of Division street in Union City announcing the death of his son, Pvt. Robert D. R. Geesy, 19, in France on July 12. The message came to Mrs. Ethel G. Geesy, the mother, who died May 21, less than two months before her son.

The text of the message from the War Department was: "The Secretary of War desires me to express his deepest regret that your son, Pvt. Robert D. R. Geesy, was killed in action on July 12 in France. Letter follows."

Pvt. Geesy was born in Winchester May 18, 1925, making his age 19 years, two and one-half months. He attended the Winchester and Wayne schools. The family came to the Union City community six years ago where the father followed his work of carpenter and contractor. The boy secured employment at the Red 73 Creamery in Union City and was working there when he entered military service Sept. 17, 1943. He received his training at Camp Van Dorn, Miss., and Camp Breckenridge, Ky., leaving for overseas the last week in March as a member of Co. G., 329th U. S. Infantry, another organization that has seen hard fighting during the invasion of France.

Pvt. Geesy's last furlough home was the week of March 12. His last letter home was dated June 30. "Just a few lines to say 'Hello' and let you know that I am O. K.," the last missive said. "I am writing you from France. How is everything back home? What are you all doing? What about the creamery? Send me some candy and chewing gum. I don't know a lot to write so will close, hoping to hear from you soon. BOB."

Back in the home on West Division street from which the mother and son have been taken so recently, remain in sorrow the father, Donald Geesy; a brother of the soldier, Harold; and twin brothers, Floyd and Lloyd. To them it will always be a source of pride their son and brother, hearing the call of duty in one of the most dangerous periods in all history, unselfishly made the supreme sacrifice that the world might be one of freedom instead of slavery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 7, 1944

Big Four Trainman Killed At Ansonia.

Greenville, Aug. 7 --- H. E. Mescall, 36, of Indianapolis, a Big Four railroad employe, was instantly killed at 4:37 p. m. Friday when he was run down by a westbound passenger train at Ansonia. Death resulted from a fractured skull and internal injuries.

Mescall was a member of the crew of an eastbound train which had stopped to take on water at a tower on the west edge of Ansonia. Evidently he did not hear the approaching passenger train, as witnesses state that he steeped directly into the path of the locomotive.

His address is 420 East St. Clair street, Indianapolis, and the body, which is now at the Fisher funeral home in Ansonia, was removed there Saturday. Funeral services and burial are planned at Indianapolis.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 7, 1944

Maud A. Preston Dies At Home, Rites Monday.

Maud Alice Preston, age 71, passed away at her home Saturday morning at 8:15 a. m., following six months of illness.

She was born December 28, 1872, the daughter of Israel and Mary Ann Rice Underwood.

She leaves the husband, William Preston, one aunt, Mrs. Ida Hutchins of Winchester and several cousins.

Mrs. Preston was a lifelong resident of Randolph county. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and the Eastern Star.

The body was removed to the Maynard and Walker mortuary and will be returned to the residence Sunday where friends may call after 1:00 p. m.

Funeral services will be held at the mortuary Monday afternoon at 2:30 p. m., in charge of Rev. G. M. Payne. Interment will be in the Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Friends Pay High Tribute To Pfc. Andrews.

Memorial services for Pfc. Robert William Andrews, son of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Andrews, Modoc route one, who gave his life for his country in the invasion of Normandy, were held recently at the Union Chapel church.

Pfc. Andrews was born April 12, 1919 at Portland. He spent most of his life in Randolph county where he was known by his many friends as "Andy." He received his education at the McKinley school near Winchester, graduating with the class of 1937. Early in life he gave his heart to Jesus remaining a faithful follower.

On Nov. 14, 1941, he entered the service of his country and received his basic training at Camp Croft, S. C. He left the states for England the latter part of December in 1942. While there he met Miss Phyllis Allum and they were united in marriage on April 29, 1944. He was killed in the Norman invasion. He leaves to mourn him, his wife Phyllis, of Cornwall, England; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Andrews; five brothers, Glen, Dick, Don, Charles and Lloyd; four sisters, Jean, Phyllis, Virginia and Sue; a little niece, Paty; and a host of relatives and friends.

His brother, Glen is stationed in the South Pacific. He also has two uncles in the service, T-S Oscar Wiebusch, stationed in Australia, and Lt. Orville Wiebusch, stationed at Ft. Jackson, S. C.

There is never a night but is followed by day. And the darkest to dawn must give peace. There is never a sorrow that crosses our way, but is sent with a message of grace. It comes to the Peasant, it comes to the King; it comes in our pleasures and pain; it comes from the Father of Mercies, to bring to his fold His own stray ones again. O soul, is thy burden too heavy to bear, does the load seem too weighty for one? There is a helper at hand all thy sorrow to share, tis thy Father's own well beloved son. Then cast every burden on Jesus thy Lord and thy troubles will quickly depart; make every sweet promise in His precious word and entrance to His loving heart.

Gracious Father guard thy children from the foes of destructive power; save, O save them, Lord from falling in this dark and trying hour. Thou will surely prove thy people, all our graces must be tried but thy word illuminates our pathway and in God we still confide.

In the sun and moon and stars, signs and wonders have appeared, earth has groaned with bloody wars, and the hearts of men have feared. But tho from its awful face heaven shall fade and earth shall fly, fear not ye, His cosen race, your redemption draweth nigh.

We wish to thank every one for their kind expressions of sympathy, for the beautiful flowers and the many cars, Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Alyea for the songs. God understands and cares. The War Mothers for their love and understanding and Rev. Fisher and Rev. Clevinger for their condolence and encouragement.

The Family.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Former Union City Teacher Dies At Manchester.

The following refers to J. D. Crowell, former principal of the Union City East Side high school while the late A. A. Hoover was superintendent:

Joseph Crowell, 67, a former teacher in rural schools in Darke County, who for the past twenty years has been a member of the faculty at Manchester College, North Manchester, Indiana, died Sunday at his home in the college town. He had been ill two weeks from heart trouble.

Crowell was born and reared on a farm near Bradford and taught in rural schools in that neighborhood for several years prior to joining the Manchester faculty.

His remains are being returned to Darke County for burial. Services will be held at the Harris Creek Church of the Brethren at 11 a. m. Wednesday with interment being made in the church cemetery.

Immediate survivors include his wife, Clara; one son, Glen and a daughter, Wanda May, both at home, and two sisters, Mrs. George Neff, of Gettysburg, and Mrs. Cassie Hoke, of near Dayton.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Lockjaw Fatal To Darke County Child.

June Alene Brinley, aged six years, daughter of Ralph and Mary Lou Lumpkin-Brinley of near Nashville, Ohio, died at the Wayne hospital in Greenville at 10:30 a. m. Sunday, after an illness of 10 days from lockjaw caused by a splinter in the foot. The child was born in Union City.

Surviving besides the parents are one brother, Billy Merle, aged four; the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William Lumpkin, of Union City, Rural Route Four, and William Brinley of Greenville, Rural Route Five; and the great-grandmothers, Mrs. Mary Troutwine of New Madison, Rural Route One, and Mrs. Ida Brinley, New Madison, Rural Route Two.

Funeral services will be held at the Nashville U. B. church Wednesday at 2 p. m. (EWT), with Rev. Earl Lantz of Union City officiating. Burial will be in Greenmound cemetery, New Madison.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that she was born Nov. 12, 1937 in Union City, IN, the daughter of Ralph Brinley (b. Darke Co., OH) and Mary Lou Lumpkin (b. Randolph Co., IN.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Son Of Former Resident Is Killed In Italy.

Word was received in Winchester this morning of the death of S-Sgt. William G. Crawford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Crawford of Richmond. S-Sgt. Crawford was killed in action over Italy on July 19. He was a radio operator on a bomber, and left the States for overseas duty on July 18 of this year.

His mother was the former Florence Parker and resided in Winchester several years ago, his aunt, Mrs. Britta Pottle Green of Indianapolis was a former teacher in the Winchester city schools.

Immediate survivors are the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Crawford; two sisters, Phyllis, at home, and Mrs. Martha Kimmel of Eldorado, Ohio; one brother, Sgt. Robert Crawford of Camp Roberts, Cal.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Former Resident Of Ridgeville Dies In Chicago.

Word has been received here of the death of Miss Leota Hood. She died in Chicago Sunday.

Miss Hood was a former resident of Ridgeville, having taught school there several years ago.

The body will arrive in Ridgeville early Wednesday morning and is to be taken to the Middleton funeral home.

Funeral services will be held at the funeral home at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. Interment will be in the Riverside cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Margaret Smith Dies Saturday; Rites Wednesday.

Mrs. Margaret Josephine Smith, 62, died Saturday afternoon.

She is survived by two daughter, Mrs. Lester Colvin of Winchester, with whom she lived, and Mrs. Joseph McGavic of Louisville, Ky.; two sons, James of the U. S. army, stationed in San Francisco, Cal., and Morris, who is stationed at the Great Lakes Naval Training station; four grandchildren; and one brother, Edward Heenan of Philadelphia, Pa.

The body was removed to the Summers funeral home for burial preparations and where friends may call.

Services will be held at the funeral home Wednesday morning at 10 a. m. in charge of Rev. Herbert Boase. Interment will be in the South Park cemetery in Martinsville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Pfc. A. V. Voisinet Killed In France.

Greenville, O., Aug. 8 - The War Department has notified Mrs. Agnes Barton, of Versailles R. R. 3, that her brother, Pfc. Anthony Vincent Voisinet, 23, was killed in action in France on July 5. The message did not disclose any details but stated that a letter follows.

Pvt. Voisinet, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Voisinet, was born at Frenchtown and was graduated from Versailles high school in the class of 1939. Prior to his induction into the army on October 28, 1942, he was employed by the Frigidaire Corporation, Dayton, and General Motors Corp., at Buffalo, N. Y.

He received his basic training with an infantry detachment at Camp Atterbury, Ind., and was sent overseas in March 1944.

Besides Mrs. Barton, he leaves seven other brothers and sisters. They are: Calvin, Aurella and Ruellia Barton, all of Dayton; Ellery, of Detroit, Mich.; Joseph of Versailles; Andrew, of New York City, and Sister Mary Vianney, of Phoenix, Arizona.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Earl O. Teaford, 64, died Friday evening at her home northeast of New Madison from a complication of diseases. Surviving are the husband, four sons, four daughters, 19 grandchildren, one great-grandchild and three sisters. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Beech Grove Church of the Brethren with Rev. Earl Lantz of Union City officiating. Burial was in the Hollansburg cemetery

[Stutz, Sando and Storch Funeral Home Records state that Adith Rebecca Teaford was born Nov. 28, 1879 near Hollansburg,OH, the daughter of William Henry Bicknell (b. IN) and Marietta White (b. Hollansburg, OH).]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Died --- John W. Nead, 64, Brown Township farmer, died Friday evening at his home northeast of Ansonia after an illness of six weeks. He had lived alone on his farm for 42 years. Surviving are two brothers and two sisters. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Fisher funeral home in Ansonia, with burial at Beamsville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 8, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Mary Isabel Beal, 85, widow of Newton Beal, died Friday afternoon at the home of a son, Edson, in Versailles. She had been bedfast since receiving a fractured hip in a fall last January. Surviving besides the son are one daughter, six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the Vermillion Christian church Sunday afternoon, with burial in Greenlawn cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 9, 1944

Heart Attack Proves Fatal To Mrs. Reisinger.

Mrs. Roxie Belle Reisinger, 67, died suddenly from heart attack at her home on Railroad street near the Deerfield Road in Union City Tuesday forenoon. She had not been in good health for several weeks, but her condition was not retarded serious.

Mrs. Reisinger was born in Jay County, Ind., July 18, 1877, the daughter of Frank and Elizabeth Denney. On Dec. 23, 1901, at Dayton, she was married to Harry Benton Reisinger who died in 1939. She formerly lived west of Union City, but for the past 12 years lived on Railroad street within the city.

She was a member of the Union City United Brethren church. Surviving is one son, Virgil Reisinger, who made his home with his mother. Mrs. Reisinger had many friends who mourn her passing.

Funeral services will be held at the Brooks funeral home in Union City Thursday at 2 p. m., with Rev. R. B. Ditmyer officiating, and with burial in the Union City cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 9, 1944

Soldier Killed In France.

Mr. and Mrs. Glen R. Hoblit of 338 East Third street, Greenville, have received from the War Department a message stating that their son, Pfc. William Hoblit, 22, was killed in action in France on July 16. Pfc. Hoblit was inducted Oct. 28, 1942, was trained at Camp Atterbury, and went overseas as member of a machine gun detachment last April. He formerly worked for the Frigidaire Corporation at Dayton. Surviving besides the parents are eight brothers and sisters. One brother is in the Army and another in the Navy.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 9, 1944

Died --- Mrs. Ida Ellen Grimes, 85, widow of Frank Grimes, died Sunday evening in her home in Greenville after a lingering illness. Surviving are two sons, three daughters, 20 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 2 p. m. at the Stocker funeral home in Greenville, with burial in Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 10, 1944

Carl Clayton Warren, 58, Takes Own Life At Home In Saratoga.

Carl Clayton Warren, 58, of Saratoga, took his life this morning at 6 o'clock in the garage of his home. He left the motor of the car running with closed doors and death was caused by the gas fumes.

Mr. Warren had been despondent over ill health and the loss of his wife a year ago.

Dr. Lowell W. Painter, county coroner, and Sheriff Kora E. Davis investigated.

Mr. Warren had been a farmer up until a few weeks ago when he sold his farm. At the time of his death he was employed at the Morrison-Tegarden Elevator company in Saratoga.

He leaves the mother, Mrs. Melissa Warren of Saratoga; one son, Captain John Curtis Warren, who is stationed at the present time at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indianapolis, and who is a doctor in the army; one granddaughter; one sister, Mrs. Pearl Tegarden of Saratoga; and one brother, Orla. Of Dowagiac, Mich.

The body was taken to the Middleton funeral home in Ridgeville. Private services will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the home of Mr. Warren's mother, Mrs. Melissa Warren, in Saratoga, with Rev. Milton Persons officiating. Burial will be in the Saratoga cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 10, 1944

Pvt. Ernest E. Huffman, Winchester R. R. 2, Killed In France July 20.

The Angel of Death resumed its rough shod march over Randolph county boys today as Mr. and Mrs. Merl Huffman, Winchester R. R. 2, received word from the War Department that their son, Pvt. Ernest E. Huffman, 19 had been killed in action. The tragedy occurred on July 20.

Pvt. Huffman graduated from Ridgeville high school in the class of 1943. He entered the service on the 18th day of November last year and had his basic training at Camp Blanding, Fla. From Camp Blanding he was transferred to Ft. Meade and there placed in overseas service and sent to England. Ernest had been in the European theater only two months.

Other than the parents he is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Harry Crow, Ridgeville, rural route 3, Helen Louise Huffman and Wanda Sue Huffman, both at home; and four brothers, Private Wilbur Huffman of the U. S. Army, Gerald, Max G. and Herbert at home. Another brother, Ora Lee Huffman, preceded him in death. Also the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Clint Huffman of near Winchester and John E. Grove of Michigan.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 10, 1944

Died --- John N. Riesley, 56, prominent Monroe Twp. Farmer and former member of the Darke County Board of Education, died suddenly Monday from heart attack at his home one mile east of Pitsburg. He was an active member of the Arcanum Masonic lodge. Surviving are the widow, one sister and five brothers. Funeral services were conducted at the residence Wednesday afternoon with burial in the Mote cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 10, 1944

Died --- Samuel Detro, 70 retired Butler Twp. farmer, died Sunday at his home in Castine after three weeks of critical illness from heart ailment. Surviving are one brother, three half-brothers, and two half-sisters. Funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday afternoon, with burial in the Castine cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, August 11, 1944

Darke County Death.

Frank Stingley, 67, former Greenville resident, died suddenly from heart attack Tuesday night at the home of a Daughter, Mrs. Walter Grubb, at Van Wert, Ohio. Surviving besides the daughter are a son, four grandchildren, a sister, and one brother. Funeral services will be held at the Stocker funeral home in Greenville Friday at 10 a. m., with burial at Spartanburg.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, August 11, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Mary Louise Shook, 70, wife of Archie Shook, of New Weston, died at 4 p. m. Wednesday at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Mildred Harter near Covington after an extended illness. The body has been returned to the Shook residence in New Weston where friends may call. Funeral services will be held at Shook's Chapel, northeast of Rossburg, Saturday at 3 p. m. with Rev. Noble Schlechty officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Immediate survivors besides the husband and daughter mentioned are two other daughters, Mrs. Delmar Michael of Rossburg, and Miss Louise Shook at home, and a son, Lloyd Shook of Piqua.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 12, 1944

It's 30 For Don C. Ward - Notable Career Of Distinguished Citizen Ends.

To use the journalistic term, it's "30" for Don C. Ward, who died at 4 o'clock this morning in the Union City hospital.

In the passing of the 60-year-old editor of the Union City Times-Gazette, eastern Indiana and western Ohio, as well as Union City and this community have lost their most widely known and one of their most distinguished citizens.

Death of Mr. Ward, taken to the hospital late Thursday night, was due to a chronic diabetic heart aggravated by an acute case of bronchitis, the extreme hot weather and the nature of his profession to which he was devoted.

Announcement of Mr. Ward's death caused great shock and sorrow - as his friends were innumerable and steadfast. His loss removes one whose place cannot be filled.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 3 p. m., place and minister to be announced later.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home in Union City for burial preparation where it will remain until time for the last rites. Friends may pay their respects after noon Sunday.

Surviving are one sister, Miss Mabel E. Ward of 517 West Pearl street, Union City, prominent club woman and history and social science teacher in the West Side school for the past 27 years; one brother, Merle S. Ward of Big Rapids, Mich., president of Ferris Institute; and two aunts, Mrs. Anna Clapp of Union City and Mrs. H. H. Wetz of Indianapolis.

Not only was Don Ward editor of the Union City Times-Gazette and correspondent for nine metropolitan and semi-metropolitan newspapers, but he was an educator and lecturer of no mean ability. As a public speaker he enjoyed a wide reputation in Ohio and Indiana, newspapers having frequently referred to his addresses as "Tilled with knowledge, inspiration, eloquence, humor and strong appeal to any audience of listeners."

Beginning his public speaking career at the age of 17 years when he delivered a Decoration day address, he became known as the "Daniel Webster of this section."

His 21 years of teaching in Randolph and Darke county schools were broken only during the periods in which he studied law and for eight and one-half years when he was postmaster at Union City - from 1915 to 1923 - during the administration of Woodrow Wilson.

Mr. Ward was born October 26, 1893 in West Union, just west of Union City, the son of the late A. H. and Ella (Scott) Ward, the later dying in 1940. The father died in 1912 and since that time the head of the family duties fell on Mr. Ward's shoulders. He was extremely devoted to his mother in her later years and in keeping with the strong family unit of the Wards, his undying devotion to his mother's welfare nearly cost his life several years ago.

Mr. Ward's father was born in Maryland, was reared in Pennsylvania and educated in the district schools and Chambersburg academy, also attending a normal college in Pennsylvania. He began teaching when a young man and followed this profession for 44 years, 36 of which he taught in the schools in Wayne township, Randolph County. He was a man of progressive ideas and was very popular and influential as an educator. Don Ward followed exemplarily in his father's footsteps, and as his father's his services were always in great demand Mr. Ward's mother was born in Winchester July 21, 1857. growing to womanhood in the county seat city, being educated here in the common schools and Winchester high school and later becoming a teacher for several years. A third son, Clyde E., died when four years of age.

Don C. (Chester) Ward received his education in the common schools of West Union and in the Union City high school, graduating from the high school at the age of 14, the youngest graduate in the history of the school. He then spent two years in the Eastern Indiana Normal university, now Ball State college, at Muncie, after which he taught school seven years, five of them in Union City and two in Wayne township. Post graduate work was taken at Columbia university in New Your City.

Deciding that some other line of endeavor would suit him better, he began the study of law in the Union City office of the Shockney brothers, also took two correspondence courses in law, one from the American School of Law in Chicago and one from the Lincoln and Jefferson school at Hammond. He was admitted to the Randolph County Bar.

In 1910 he became assistant city attorney of Union City, but believing that journalism held still greater attractions for him he became connected with the Eagle Publishing company of Union City, on June 1, 1912, and became editor and manager of the Union City Eagle.

In October of 1943 he became editor of the Times-Gazette, successfully filling the vacancy left when Gib Swaim moved to Bloomington.

Mr. Ward was unmarried. Politically he was a Democrat, active during campaigns and himself was a two-time Democratic nominee for congress, the first time in 1928 when he was defeated by Albert H. Vestal when Randolph county was in the old eighth congressional district and in 1940 when he ran against Cong. Raymond S. Springer in the now present tenth district. Mr. Ward, always a Democrat, for 24 years - from the beginning to the 1944 affair - was master of ceremony at every Wilson club banquet held in Randolph county.

He was a member of the Methodist church, the Elks club, Rotary and was an honorary member of the new-organized Union City Kiwanis club.

Beginning his teaching career in a one-room school south of Union City, he then taught in the Union City, Ind., eighth grade for five years, was principal at Wayne two years and rose to the East Side superintendency which position he held five years.

Then Mr. Ward left teaching, to become a lecturer, serving on the staff of Ohio State university at Columbus and being in great demand for farmers' Institutes for seven years. He was also in great demand as commencement and banquet speaker.

Added to his other virtues were his interest in music, at one time playing with the Haysville band and becoming a member and manager of the Union City Concert band, being president of the latter for 25 years.

Mr. Ward's service to his community and his interest in youth showed in his teaching and club activities and his former pupils join with his later year friends in mourning his death.

He never lost sight of youth - he grieved with the parents who have lost sons in World War II, their loss seeming to be his.

It is recalled that during World War I when he was postmaster at Union City he would sort out soldier-boy mail on Sundays and make the deliveries himself by bicycle - just so the parents would get word of their sons one day earlier.

[Funeral services were conducted on Tuesday afternoon at the Fraze Funeral Home in Union City, with Dr. J. Floyd Seelig, of Indianapolis, officiating, assisted by several Union City ministers. Interment was made in the Union City cemetery.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 12, 1944

Former County Resident Dies In Dunkirk.

Mrs. Laura Belle Bales, 79, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Earl Mumbower, in Dunkirk, Wednesday evening.

Mrs. Bales was a former resident of Randolph county but had resided with her daughter in Dunkirk for the past ten years.

She leaves her daughter, Mrs. Mumbower; three sons, William of Muncie, John and James of Eaton; three sisters, Mrs. Molly Tully of Albany, Mrs. Martha Caylor of Redkey, and Mrs. Jesse Irvin of New Madison, O.; two brothers, Charles Hastings of Farmland, and George Hastings of Bryant.

The body was taken to the Thornburg funeral home in Farmland and has been returned to the home of Mrs. Earl Mumbower in Dunkirk, where friends may call.

Funeral services will be Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock at Powers Station, north of Winchester, with Rev. Zelma Mills officiating. Burial will be in the Hopewell cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 12, 1944

Long Illness Proves Fatal To Myrtle Mills.

Mrs. Myrtle Mills, 59, passed away Thursday at the Randolph County hospital at 2:30 p. m. due to a lingering illness.

She leaves the husband, Arthur; one daughter, Gladys Hennessee of Jackson, Fla.; one son, James A., serving with the United State army in the South Pacific; one sister, Mrs. Frank Blizzard, and one brother, Earl Moore, both of Winchester; and four grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p. m. at the Maynard and Walker funeral home in charge of Rev. Leo McKinley. Interment will be in the Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 12, 1944

Infant Jessup Dies At Home Thursday Night.

Sharon Kay Jessup, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Jessup, 522 Wall street, Winchester, died at the home of her parents Thursday evening.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home. Graveside services will be held at the Maxville cemetery at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon in charge of Rev. N. B. Herrell.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 14, 1944

Soldier Killed In Normandy On July 2nd.

Mrs. Doris Arnett, of 318 Hart Avenue, Greenville, was notified by the war department that her husband, Pfc. Tom D. Arnett, 24, who was seriously wounded in action in Normandy on July 2, had died on the same date.

A son of Mr. and Mrs. David Arnett, who reside at Stelvideo on Greenville R. R. 5, Pvt. Arnett was inducted into the army on August 24, 1942 and after basic training at Camp Wheeler, Ga., was sent overseas on Christmas Day of the same year. He was stationed in England prior to D-Day. Besides the wife and parents, he leaves a twin brother, John, also in the armed forces; four other brothers, Jess and Junior, at home; Roy of Dayton and Walter of Greenville R. R., and one sister, Mrs. John Cross, also of Dayton.

His wife is making her home with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Ingle at the Hart Avenue address.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 14, 1944

Darke County Death.

J. Addison Hetzler, 71, custodian of the Greenville Methodist church, died very suddenly at his home Friday morning from a heart attack. He was a retired farmer and had lived in Greenville for the past seven years. He is survived by his wife, Stella; two sons, Wayne, of Chicago; and Rev. Russell Hetzler of Linden, Ind.; one daughter, Mrs. Betty Slater of Goodlin, Ind., three grandchildren and five sisters. Funeral services were held today at the Zechar Funeral home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 14, 1944

Darke County Death.

William Gift, 79, formerly of Arcanum, died suddenly Thursday from a heart attack at the St. Clair Home for the Aged at 224 East Third street in Greenville. Gift was born and reared near Arcanum and had spent his entire life in Darke County. He was a member of the Arcanum U. B. Church. His only immediate survivors are a brother, David Gift, and one nephew, both of Dayton. Funeral services were held Saturday at the Hoffman Funeral Home at Arcanum with Rev. George Duckwall officiating. Burial was in the Ithaca cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 14, 1944

Pvt. George J. Neil Of Ridgeville Killed In Action In France July 16.

Word has been received by Mrs. Doris Lee Neil, of Ridgeville, of the tragic death of her husband, Private George J. Neil, 23, who was killed in action in France on July 16. Mrs. Neil was formerly Doris Lee of Madison township, Jay county, Ind.

Private Neil was born Jan. 6, 1921, the son of Seber and Ruth Ramsey Neil. He graduated from the Saratoga high school with the class of 1938. Prior to his induction on Nov. 18, 1943, he was employed by the Kraft Cheese company at Ridgeville.

He received his basic training at Camp Blanding, Fla., and was later transferred to Fort George Meade, Md., and from there he was sent overseas. His last letter home was dated July 1. Pvt. Neil was in the infantry.

Besides the wife and parents, Private Neil leaves, two brothers, Pfc. Edward R. Neil of the Marines, stationed somewhere in the South Pacific, and Jack, at home; and one sister, Nancy Ann, at home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 14, 1944

Husband Of Former Winchester Teacher Killed In Action.

Friends in Winchester have been advised that Ensign Friedt of the U. S. Navy Air Corps was killed in combat at sea July 14.

Mrs. Friedt was the former Miss Arnold, physical education teacher in the Winchester high school last year.

Miss Arnold resigned her position here last spring to join Ensign Friedt in Maryland where they were married.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 15, 1944

Receives Notice Of Nephew's Death.

Mrs. Hazel Meredith, of West Pearl street in Union City, was notified Monday morning by long distance telephone of the death of her nephew, Sgt. Vern Overdeer, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Vern Overdeer, Sr., of Elyria, Ohio.

Sgt. Overdeer has served with the United States Armed forces for five years and has been overseas for nearly three years. He was stationed in Iceland and the last word they received from him he was in Ireland. The message from the war department stated that he had been killed in action in France on July 26. Survivors besides the parents, include a sister, Mrs. Russell Koehn of Elyria.

Mrs. Overdeer is a sister of Mrs. Meredith and the Overdeer family are well known here by their frequent visits to the city.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 15, 1944

Long Illness Proves Fatal To Mary Courtney.

Miss Mary L. Courtney, 30, died Sunday at the Robert Long hospital in Indianapolis after a long illness.

She leaves her mother, Mrs. Pearl Courtney of Saratoga; one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Edwards of Greenville, O.; and one brother, James, who is serving with the armed forces of the United States and is stationed at Fort Knox, Ky.

The body was brought to the Middleton mortuary in Ridgeville and will be taken to the home of the mother in Saratoga Monday afternoon where friends may call.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Church of God in Saratoga. Interment will be in the New Pittsburg cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 15, 1944

Darke County Death.

Henry Schemmel, a prominent Patterson township farmer, died Friday at his home near Osgood from the effects of a paralytic stroke suffered two weeks ago. He was an active member of St. Nicholas Catholic church at Osgood where services were held Monday morning. Survivors include one son, John, at home; two daughter, Mrs. Eleanor Heitkamp and Mrs. Rose Tumbusch, both of Casella; 20 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 15, 1944

Darke County Death.

Charles F. Beam, 72, died Friday at his farm home near Covington from the effects of a stroke he suffered a week ago. He is survived by his wife, Mary Elizabeth; two sons, Orville of Piqua; and Stanley of Rossburg; a daughter, Mrs. John Morretty of Troy; one step-son, Elias Pittsenbarger; 16 grandchildren, 6 great-grandchildren and 5 brothers. Funeral services were held Monday at the Greenville Sugar Creek church with burial in the church cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 15, 1944

Darke County Death.

August A. Trittschuh, 77, died at ten a. m. Saturday after a lingering illness from uremic poisoning, at his home in Versailles. He was an employe of the Nickols Monument works. He leaves a wife, Ida; one daughter, Mrs. Edwin Nickol of Versailles, three grandchildren, nine great grandchildren, two brothers and three sisters. Funeral services were held Tuesday at Emanuel Lutheran church at Versailles with burial in Greenlawn cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 15, 1944

Former Resident Dies In California.

Ollie Albertson of Lynn received a telegram Monday stating that his aunt, Mrs. Winifred H. Milligan, had died Sunday at her home in Whittier, Calif., after a lingering illness.

Mrs. Milliigan will be remembered in Winchester as the widow of Dr. Charles E. Milligan.

The body will be brought back to Winchester this week for burial. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

[Funeral services were held on Monday, Aug. 21, 1944 at the Winchester Friends church in charge of Rev. William J. Sayers. Interment was made in Fountain Park cemetery. She leaves one brother, W. E. Hinshaw of Long Beach, Cal.; two nephews, Ollie Albertson of Lynn, and Ernest Reece of Detroit, Mich.; and two nieces, Mrs. Samuel Hinshaw and Mrs. Frank Johnson, both of near Lynn.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 16, 1944

Darke County Death.

George W. Fryman, 84, a resident of the Church of the Brethren Home for the past two years passed away Sunday at the Wayne Hospital after a three month's illness. He was admitted to the hospital Saturday. Mr. Fryman lived most of his life at Arcanum. He leaves three sons, Paul and dale, of Dayton and Denver: three daughters, Mrs. Gladys Grise of West Milton; Mrs. Gertrude Sease, of Dayton; and Mrs. Ruby Seibel of Greenville; 13 grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and two sisters. Funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at the Stutz and Sando funeral home in Arcanum, burial in Mote cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 16, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Bertha Herrmann, widow of the late Frank Herrmann, died Sunday evening at her home at 320 Twelfth street, Greenville. Mrs. Herrmann had been a resident of Greenville for 32 years and was a member of the St. Mary's Catholic church. She is survived by six sons and one daughter and eight grandchildren. Funeral services were held today at the St. Mary's church with Rev. Father John Gnau officiating. Interment in the church cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 16, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Minnie Meeker, 77, widow of the late Walter S. Meeker prominent Greenville attorney, died at her home at 102 South Broadway, after an extended illness. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Herman L. Brown of Greenville; two granddaughters, Mrs. Nolen Mills of Detroit; and Mrs. Richard T. Baker of Cleveland; one grandson, Walter L. Brown, who serves in the U. S. Engineering corp. Funeral services will be conducted at the Meeker home Thursday at 2:30 p. m. with Rev. Frank Thomas officiating. Interment in the Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 17, 1944

Greenville Soldier Killed In Action.

The War Department has notified Mrs. Angeline Stein, of 105 South Broadway, Greenville, that her son, Pfc. Carl Drew, 22, recently reported missing in action in France on July 3 had met his death on that date.

Pvt. Drew served in an airborne infantry, or glider troop detachment and was a veteran of both the North African and Sicilian campaigns. He was transferred to England shortly before the June 6 "D-Day" in France.

He entered military service on November 28, 1942, and had been overseas for nearly eighteen months

A native of Butler township, Darke County, he attended Arcanum high school and prior to his induction was employed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. His father, the late George Drew, died in 1934.

He has three brothers in service, all in the Navy. They are Charles Drew, now stationed at San Francisco; George Drew, Jr., who is in the Mediterranean area, and James Drew, of Richmond, Va.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, August 18, 1944

Darke County Death.

Miss Ella Miller, 58, died late Tuesday afternoon at the home of her mother, Mrs. Catherine Miller, 600 Wayne avenue in Greenville, after a year's illness. She was a member of the Central avenue Brethren church where funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. G. L. Wine will officiate. Burial will be in Greenville cemetery. Besides the mother she leaves four brothers: Charles C., of Roan, Ind.; Earl, of Bradford; Henry of Bradford route two; and William of Dayton; two sisters, Mrs. Roy Hollinger of Versailles; and Mrs. John Oliver of Greenville.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that she was born May 10, 1886 in Wayne Twp., Darke Co., OH, the daughter of Isaac R. Miller and Catherine Maurer (both b. in Darke Co., OH). The burial was made in Harris Creek Cemetery, Miami Co., OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 19, 1944

William Lephart Claimed By Death.

William Henry Lephart, 77, a retired Darke County farmer, died at 2:06 a. m. today at his home in Lightsville following a two-year illness.

A lifelong resident of the county, Lephart was born and reared in Brown township.

He leaves a wife, Sarah; two sons, William I. and Harris R. Lephart; both of Muncie, Ind.; six daughters, Mrs. Harley Sink, New Weston, R. R.; Mrs. Ben Hoffman, Farmland, Ind.; Mrs. Thomas Owen, Eaton, Ind.; Mrs. Lloyd Dill, Yorktown, Ind.; Mrs. Clarence McAllister, of Indianapolis, Ind., and Mrs. Glen Poling, Muncie; thirty-four grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

There are also four bothers, Fred and John Lephart, both of Ansonia; Charles of Greenville, and James, of Muncie, and three sisters, Mrs. Catherine Westfall, Rossburg; Mrs. Margaret Fourman, Lewisburg, and Mrs. Angeline Poling, Dayton.

Funeral services will be held Monday at 10:30 a. m. (EWT) at the Lightsville M. E. church with Rev. Noble Schlechty officiating. Burial will be in Elm Ridge cemetery at Muncie, Ind.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 19, 1944

C. Abernathy, 77, Dies At Home In Lynn Thursday.

Charles Abernathy, age 77, passed away at his home in Lynn at 11:30 p. m. Thursday, after an illness of three months.

He is survived by the widow, Ada; two sons, Paul of New Castle, Ind., and Titus with the armed forces of the United States serving overseas; and one daughter, Mrs. Floyd Tharpe, of Lynn.

The body was taken to the Thomas funeral home in Lynn. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 19, 1944

Darke County Death.

George H. Gibson, 67, of New Weston, died Wednesday at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Wanda Cross, at Pitsburg, following a six weeks illness. A lifelong resident of Darke County he had been active in farming pursuits for over forth years. He leaves four other daughters, Mrs. Gladys Lake, Piqua; Mrs. Helen McBride, Mrs. Evelyn Swafford and Mrs. Thelma Hecht, all of Dayton; one son, Leroy, who serves in the U. S. army at St. Petersburg; 15 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren; three brothers, John Gibson of Union City, Blaine Gibson of Piqua, and Harley Gibson of Dayton; three sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Cottrell and Mrs. Hattie Foster of New Weston; and Mrs. Ada Mannix of Jackson, Mich. Funeral services were held Friday at 2:30 p. m. at Shooks Chapel with Rev. J. A. Thornton, officiating.

Burial was in the church cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 21, 1944

Last Rites For Milo T. Wilson To Be Tuesday.

Milo T. Wilson, 82, died Saturday morning at nine o'clock at his home in Hillgrove after an illness of nine weeks resulting from a paralytic stroke. He is the son of Robert and Lavina Moyer-Wilson and was born February 7, 1862, at the Wilson Homestead near Hillgrove that has been in the family since 1852.

Mr. Wilson attended the country school near his home and was married on March 29, 1883, to Miss Emma Daubenmire at the home of the late Rev. Ben Sharp near Greenville. Following the occupation of farming he lived near Hillgrove until twenty-three years ago when he retired and moved to his present home. Last year he and Mrs. Wilson celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary.

Survivors besides the wife, are one daughter, Mrs. Ervin (Gertie) Wilson of near Woodington, Ohio; two sons, Delbert of Seattle, Washington; and W. R. Wilson of Wilson Canning company, near Hillgrove; six grandchildren and six great -grandchildren.

Mr. Wilson was a member of the Hillgrove Federated church. The body was removed from the Fraze Funeral Home Monday noon to the residence where funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock (CWT) with Rev. H. G. Perry of Salamonia officiating. Rev. and Mrs. Earl Lantz of Union City will sing. Interment will be in the Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 21, 1944

McKinney Infant Buried Sunday.

Stephen Earl McKinney, infant son of Pvt. and Mrs. Ernest McKinney, died at the Union City Hospital Saturday afternoon, and graveside services were held Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the New Pittsburg cemetery with Rev. H. G. Perry officiating.

The mother of the infant was formerly Miss Alice Hobson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hobson of route two, Union City, and the father is stationed with the armed forces at a camp in Texas. The infant lived seven hours having been born by caesarian section Saturday morning.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 21, 1944

Darke County Death.

Charles Ganger, 38, an employe of the Waco Aircraft Company, Troy, died very unexpectedly Friday at his farm home southwest of Laura from the effects of a heart attack. He leaves a wife, Mollie; four children, Charles, Ernest, Ruth and Esther; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Ganger, of Bradford; and three brothers, Ivan and Russell, of Ludlow Falls, and Leo, of Bradford, and one sister, Mrs. Hazel Bard, of Ansonia. Funeral services were held Monday at the Stutz and Sando funeral home at West Milton.

[Burial was made in the Mote Cemetery at Pitsburg, Darke Co., OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 21, 1944

Accident Proves Fatal To Ralph Eugene Rehmert, 15.

Ralph Eugene Rehmert, 15 year old son of Cletus and Mary Snyder-Rehmert, of five miles south of Union City on the State Line, on route four, was fatally injured in an automobile accident which occurred Sunday morning at 12:30 o'clock on State Route 227, one and one-half miles south of the city.

Rehmert was driving a bakery truck owned by Stephen Dubeansky and was accompanied by Raymond Gilmore also of route four, Union City, when they collided with a 1939 Oldsmobile sedan driven by Chester Mock, of route five, and owned by his brother, Leo Mock. Other occupants of the Mock car were Misses Pauline and Margaret Geyer, of North Plum street; Miss Rosemary Porter of South Howard street, and John Hall, Jr., of West Pearl street.

Rehmert received a fractured skull, fractured right arm and internal injuries; and was taken to the Union City hospital where death occurred at 6:20 o'clock Sunday evening. Gilmore received several fractured ribs and cuts; Chester Mock was cut about his head and hands; Miss Porter received a very badly lacerated knee and the remainder of the group received minor injuries and all seven were treated at the hospital and later removed to their homes. Both the Brooks and Fraze ambulances were called to the scene of the accident. Sheriff Kora E. Davis, of Winchester, investigated and reported that both cars were completely demolished.

Ralph Eugene Rehmert was born March 1, 1929 at Arcanum, Ohio, and has lived for the past eight years at his late home. He attended the Union City East Side school and assisted his father with farming.

Survivors besides the parents, include five sisters, Margaret, Virgie, Naomi, Nancy Lou and Dorothy Ann; four brothers, Carl, Donald, Marvin, and David, all at home; and one grandmother, Mrs. Maggie Rehmert of Piqua.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock (CWT) at the Abbottsville United Brethren church and interment will be in the church cemetery. The body will be removed from the Miller Funeral home in Greenville Monday evening to the late residence where friends may call.

[Miller Funeral Home Records added that both his parents, Cletus Rehmert and Mary Lucinda Snyder, were born in Darke Co., OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 21, 1944

Roy H. Best Dies Suddenly Sunday Morning.

The Union City community was shocked and saddened Sunday morning to learn of the sudden death of Roy H. Best, 51, well known ice dispenser in this city for many years. Mr. Best was delivering ice to the Union City Sweet shop about nine o'clock when he was stricken. According to John Koulis, owner of the shop, he noticed Mr. Best start to fall, and caught him, but death came before aid could be summoned. When a physician arrived he gave the cause of death as coronary thrombosis.

Mr. Best was born December 2, 1892, at Irvin, Kentucky, the son of Harry and Ida Sampson-Best and moved to Union City when a small boy. He received his education in the city schools and was married on September 19, 1916 to Miss Mary Jane Crawford at Winchester. They have resided at 330 South Howard street for the past 26 years. Mr. Best was a member of the Red Men and Modern Woodmen of this city.

Survivors besides the wife, include one son, Robert C. Best; three daughters, Mrs. D. C. Beam, Mrs. Kenneth Groell and Miss Phyllis Best, all of Union City; two grandchildren; one sister, Mrs. Nell Buckingham of Dayton. Two half-sisters, Mrs. John Thornburg and Miss Hazel Cooper of Winchester; and one half-brother, Robert Cooper of Dayton.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home with Rev. Earl Lantz officiating. Interment will be made in the Union City cemetery.

Obituary published Sept, 2, 1944 - There are many proofs that human life is a precious thing. Among them we find the fact that people have always liked to write and keep records of the lives of those that they loved.

A little more than fifty years ago, Dec. 2, 1892, the eldest son of Harry and Ida Simpson Best was born. Their home was at Erivine, Ky. Quite early, tragedy stalked this home and the husband and a younger son Howard passed away. When the eldest son, to whom they gave the name of Leroy Henry, was four years old, the mother came to Union City, Ind. To make her home.

Having attained school age, Leroy attended the South-side school, continuing thee until he left his books to find work.

September 9, 1916, he married Miss Mary Jane Crawford. For several years they lived at 337 South Howard street, then they moved to the present home at 330 South Howard, about twelve years ago.

One son and three daughters were born to this home. They are as follows: Robert of Union City; Maxine, now Mrs. D. C. Beam and Betty, now Mrs. Kenneth Gorrell, both with the mother in the home at present, their husbands being in the armed forces. Also Phyllis at home. He enjoyed his two granddaughters, Beverly Anne and Sue Kathryn Best.

For several years he was employed by Grimes Bros. Meat Market. Then he became more definitely connected with the Ice Delivery Business, working for other for a while, then about twelve years ago he assumed control of the business fro himself. No one in any business served the public more faithfully than he. He was conscientious about his work, always bringing a ray of sunshine in the home where he carried his daily load that contributed so much to the welfare of our city.

Other served differently, but none any better. He loved children, and many, some now grown to mature years, have pleasant memories of their most congenial ice-man

In former years he attended the Christian Church. He was a member of the Modern Woodman fraternity.

Besides the immediate family he leaves one half brother, Robert Cooper, of Dayton, Ohio, and three half sisters; Mrs. Nellie Buckingham, also of Dayton, Ohio, Mrs. Arietta Hyre, and Hazel Cooper, both of Winchester, Indiana. There are other relatives and a host of friends among all classes of our citizens.

He died suddenly early Sunday morning, Aug. 20, 1944, while serving ice to one of our business houses, (The Sweet Shop). He was in his 51st year.

[Followed by a poem that was not copied.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 22, 1944

Final Rites For Mrs. R. Harris To Be Wednesday.

Final rites for Mrs. Roscoe Harris, 76, who passed away at her home six miles southeast of Winchester Sunday evening, will be held at the Jericho Friends church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. Fred Smith with Rev. Laura Fetters assisting.

She was born in Randolph county in 1868, the daughter of Henry and Luzena (Coffin) Coble.

Graduating from the Winchester high school, Mrs. Harris was a teacher in her early years.

She was a member of the Jericho Friends church, the Eastern Star lodge and the Daughters of the Union.

Surviving besides the husband are two sons, Merrill of Chicago, and Carroll of Kokomo; three daughters, Melva at home, Mrs. Howard Stump of Union City and Mrs. William Hendrickson of near Winchester. Eight grandchildren and one great grandchild.

The body has been removed to the home from the Maynard and Walker mortuary and where friends may call.

Interment will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 22, 1944

Short Illness Proves Fatal To Chester A. Hough.

Chester A. Hough, 60, passed away at his home five and one-half miles southeast of Winchester Monday at 8:45 a. m. after an illness of three weeks.

He was the son of John and Mae (Manning) Hough and was born in 1884 near Spartanburg.

Surviving are the widow, Mae; one daughter, Mary, at home; two brothers, Thomas of Versailles and Clarence of Richmond; one sister, Mrs. Norvall Anderson of Spartanburg and several nieces and nephews.

The body was removed to the Maynard and Walker Mortuary for burial preparations and will be returned to the residence at 10 a. m. Tuesday when friends may call.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

[Funeral services were held at the Spartanburg Methodist church on Thursday afternoon. Interment was made in the Spartanburg cemetery.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 22, 1944

Darke County Death.

Sylvester E. Richardson, 88-year-old Wabash township farmer, died Friday at his home east of North Star after an illness of several years duration. His survivors are two sisters, Mrs. Selinda Friend and Viola Richardson, with whom he made his home, and two brothers, Madison Richardson of Yorkshire and Lawrence Richardson of Rossburg. Funeral services were Sunday afternoon.

[Oliver Funeral Home Records state that he was born in Miami Co., OH, the son of Thomas Richardson (b. Wabash Twp., Darke Co., OH) and Elizabeth Poe (b. Phillipsburg, OH. His occupation was listed as wagon maker. He was a widower.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 23, 1944

Ira O. Potter Dies At Hospital Monday Night.

Ira O. Potter, 73, a resident of Arba for the past ten years and a former resident of Winchester, passed away at the Randolph County hospital Monday evening at 8:30 o'clock following a short illness.

Surviving are one sister, Mrs. Waldo Hickman, and several nieces and nephews.

The son of Octavious and Mary (Doughes) Potter, he was born on March 22, 1871 in Randolph county and at the time of his death was a retired mechanic having been employed at the Ol Davis garage and the Anchor Hocking glass factory.

Funeral services for Mr. Potter will be held at 10 a. m. Thursday at the Maynard and Walker mortuary in charge of Rev. G. M. Payne, pastor of the Winchester Presbyterian church. Burial will be in the Fountain Park cemetery.

Friends may call at the mortuary after 7 p. m. Tuesday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 23, 1944

Brother Of Local Resident Killed On French Front.

Mrs. Robert Spradling of Winchester received word Monday evening that her brother, Pvt. William H. Settles, was killed in action in France on Aug. 3.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 23, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Sarah Luella Supinger, 78, of Ansonia, died Monday at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Cletus Huffman, at Piqua. Immediate survivors include two brothers, David Sebring of Drumright, Okla.; and James Sebring of Versailles, Ohio; two sisters, Mrs. Delbert Miller of Centerville, O., and Mrs John Garrison, Davidson, Mich.; six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p. m. Wednesday at the North Star Christian church.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 24, 1944

Last Rites For Eliza Thompson To Be Sunday.

At her home at 218 West Hickory street, Union City, Mrs. Eliza Thompson, 87, succumbed to a paralytic stroke Wednesday at 1:40 p. m. After falling on her porch Monday morning Mrs. Thompson lapsed into unconsciousness and never rallied.

Mrs. Thompson was well known in the community, having lived here 31 years, and was a life-long member of the Church of the Brethren. Her parents were Art and Deborah Lane-Sutton and she was born on September 30, 1856; and has lived all her life in Indiana. She was married to Frederick Thompson who preceded her in death several years ago.

Two daughters, Mrs. Charlotte Lewis, 218 West Hickory street and Mrs. Laura E. Lynch, Playa Del Rey, Calif.; two sons, John A. Thompson, Edmonds, Washington, and Grover Thompson, San Francisco, Calif.; fourteen grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren will mourn the passing of their mother and grandmother.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p. m. at the Church of the Brethren at Union City. Rev. D. G. Berkebile will officiate. Until the hour of the funeral the body will be at the Fraze Funeral home where friends may call. Burial will be made at the Brethren Cemetery north of this city.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 24, 1944

Jane Doughty Dies At Home In Losantville.

Mrs. Jane Ellen Doughty, 81, passed away at her home in Lossantville Wednesday morning at 9:30 o'clock.

She is survived by the husband, Charles; two sons, Frank and Ralph Allen of South Bend; and one step-son, Jay O. Allen of Iola, Kan.

The body was taken to the Reynard funeral home in Farmland for burial preparations and where it will remain until the time of the funeral.

Funeral services will be held in the Losantville Methodist church at 10:30 a. m. Friday with Rev. C. O. Johnson of Shirley, Ind., in charge. Interment will be in the Summittville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 24, 1944

Darke County Death.

Virgil Mitchel, 31, son of Mr. and Mrs. Russel Mitchel died Sunday evening from complications resulting from an extended illness. He leaves besides his parents, his widow, Ruth Landis Mitchel; four children, Virgil 7, Jack 6, Joan 4, and Don 2; two brothers, Tom Mitchel of Bradford and Verdon Mitchel of Richmond, Ind., and one sister, Mrs. John Clack of Laura. Services were conducted at the Brethren church by Rev. G. E. Weaer Wednesday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, August 25, 1944

Philip Fodrea Dies At Home Near Selma.

Philip Fodrea, 63, died at his home near Selma at approximately 3:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Fodrea's occupation was farming.

He leaves the widow, Arvilla; one daughter, Ethyl Fodrea, at home; one sister, Mrs. Charles Gable of near Parker; and one brother, Russell, of Farmland.

The body was removed to the Thornburg funeral home in Farmland. Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Union church near Windsor, south of Parker, with Rev. N. H. Thornburg officiating. Burial will be in the adjoining cemetery.

The body will be returned to the Fodrea home Thursday afternoon where friends may call after 4 p. m.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, August 25, 1944

Death Claims Leona M. Wise; Rites Friday.

Leona Mae Wise, 11, passed away at the home of her parents in Plainfield, Ind., Wednesday following a lingering illness.

She is survived by the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Merrill Wise; one brother, Ralph Eugene, at home; the grandparents, Mrs. Florence Stuckey of Spartanburg, and Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Wise of near Spartanburg; two uncles and one aunt.

The body was removed to the Thomas funeral home in Lynn. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Spartanburg Christian church in charge of Rev. Wilbur Thorne. Burial will be in the Spartanburg cemetery.

Friends may call at the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Wise after 10 a. m. Friday

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, August 26, 1944

Mrs. Mary Anderson Dies Friday In Lima.

Following an extended illness, Mrs. Mary E. Anderson, 88, formerly of Union City, died at 5:00 p. m. yesterday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Edna L. DuPere in Lima, Ohio.

Mrs. Anderson was well known in Union City, having lived here from 1904 to 1936. She belonged to the Methodist church and was active in church affairs. Her parents were Frances and James Dewees and she was born Feb. 16, 1856 in Sidney, Ohio. In 1876 she married Charles C. Anderson at Sidney and it was only ten years before his death.

She leaves one daughter, Mrs. DuPere of Lima, and one son, Walter D. Anderson of Union City; two grandchildren, Anna Mary Weaver of Ottawa, Ohio, and C. Pierce Anderson of Union City; two great-grandchildren, Harriet Jo Weaver and Charles Allen Anderson.

The funeral will be at 2:00 Monday at the Sifert Funeral Home in Lima and the burial will be at Graceland Cemetery at Sidney. Until the time of the funeral the body will be at 721 South Atlantic ave., Lima, the home of her daughter.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 28, 1944

Final Rites For A. N. Wagner Held Sunday.

Albert N. Wagner, 70, of Lightsville, former superintendent of the Darke County Children's Home and a teacher in rural schools in the county for several years, died Thursday at the Carter Rest Home, 450 E. Third street, Greenville, after an eight-month illness.

Wagner, who was a Darke county native, taught for many years in rural districts in the Lightsville vicinity before being appointed as home superintendent and later he operated a general store in Lightsville with a brother, the late Lew Wagner.

He was a charter member of the Lightsville Grange and attended the Lightsville M. E. church.

His only immediate survivors are a son, James, of Dayton, and six nephews and one niece.

Funeral services were conducted from the Lightsville church at three p. m. (EWT) Sunday with the Rev. Noble Schlechty officiating. Burial was in the Teegarden Cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that Albert Newton Wagner was born Nov. 27, 1873 in Darke Co., OH, the son of Joel Wagner and Eliza Riegel (b. Darke Co., OH), divorced. His occupation was farmer. His spouse was Mary Wagner.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 28, 1944

Mrs. D. Stearns Dies Following Long Illness.

Funeral services for Mrs. Dorence Stearns, 46, who passed away at the Randolph County hospital Saturday afternoon at 1:45 o'clock following an illness of eight years, will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Winchester Presbyterian church with Rev. G. M. Payne officiating. Interment will be in the Fountain Park cemetery.

Mrs. Stearns was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Detrich Spilla of near Saratoga and was graduated from the Union City high school with the class of 1916. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, the Madonna class, the past president of the Home Economics clubs of Randolph county.

Surviving are the husband, Dorence; one son, Keith of the naval taring station, Norfolk, Va.; one daughter, Mrs. Donald L. Overman of Winchester; one brother, Herman Spilla of Greenville, O.; and four sisters, Mrs. Ernest Romiser of Union City, Mrs. Warren Welbourn of Pasadena, Cal., Mrs. Harold White of New Orleans, La., and Mrs. Frank Smith of Long Island, N. Y.

The body was taken to the Maynard and Walker mortuary for burial preparations and has been removed to the residence on East Short street, where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 28, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Emma Jane Sutton, 76, whose husband, William F. Sutton died three weeks ago, passed away Thursday afternoon at her home in Lightsville following an extended illness. She leaves four sons: Roby Duey and Frederick Duey, of Gary; Ira Duey, New Weston, Ohio, and Albert Duey, Troy, Ohio; two daughters, Mrs. Bessie Oblinger, Dunkirk, Ind., and Mrs. Clarence Lyne, of Sidney, Ohio; one brother, Ira Hartman, Tipton; and two step-sons, Truman and George Sutton both of Dayton. Funeral services were held Saturday at three p. m. at the Lightsville M. E. church with the Rev. Noble Schlechty officiating. Burial was at Springhill cemetery, Fort Recovery, O.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that she was born Dec. 10, 1867 in Henry Co., OH, the daughter of Allen Hartman and Nancy A. Robinson (both b. Highland Co., OH).]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, August 28, 1944

Died --- Word has been received in Union City of the death of Mrs. H. L. Robinson; step-mother of Mrs. G. H. Davis of this city, which occurred at the St. Francis Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, following surgery. Interment was made in the Columbus cemetery. Mrs. Robinson was a former resident of this city.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 29, 1944

R. Eichelberger Dies Monday Nite After Long Illness.

Richard Earl Eichelberger, 21, died at 9 o'clock Monday night at his home at 517 E. Elm street in Union City. Richard had a medical discharge from the army on August 17, 1943 and following a year of poor health he died of complications.

Richard was born south of Union City and had lived all his life in this community. He attended the East Side school and graduated from there in 1942, following graduation he worked in his father's grocery store. On December 12, 1942 he was inducted into the army and served in the infantry. On returning he became a member of the American Legion.

His mother Priscilla Shockney-Eichelberger died Jan. 15, 1934. He leaves his father, Earl Eichelberger and his foster mother Mrs. Blanche Eichelberger, of Union City; one half sister, Patricia Eichelberger and two foster sisters, Helen Jones of North Star, and Evelyn Helmelgarn of Yorkshire; one grandmother Mrs. Pearl Eichelberger of Union Cit; one great grandfather, J. B. Eichelberger and several aunts and uncles.

The body will be returned from the Fraze Funeral home to the residence Tuesday afternoon, where friends may call. The funeral will be held at the United Brethren church, Thursday at 2 p. m. with Rev. R. B. Ditmyer officiating. The body will be interred at the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 29, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Lona Westfall, 63, widow of the late Calvin W. Westfall, died suddenly Saturday at her home in Greenville, from the effects of a heart attack. She leaves two sons, Ralph H. Westfall, of Greenville, and Lt. David B. Westfall, who is stationed at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.; one grandchild; four brothers, Earl Cox, Greenville; Worley Cox, Detroit, Mich.; Arla Cox, Dayton, and Glen Cox, Flint, Mich., and four sisters, Mrs. Bertha Tyler and Mrs. Hanford Wright, both of Greenville, and Mrs. Grace Aten and Mrs. Harry A. Fourman, both of Arcanum. Funeral services were held Tuesday at 2:30 p. m. at the Abbottsville church with Rev. E. V. Loucks officiating Burial will be at the church cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 29, 1944

Last Rites For Elizabeth Russ To Be Friday.

Mrs. Elizabeth Russ, 71, died this morning at 5 o'clock at the home of her niece and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore at 236 South Walnut street in Union City, after an illness of several weeks from a heart ailment. Mrs. Russ was the daughter of Thomas and Margaret Lyons and was born on a farm near Union City on September 3, 1872.

She attended the country school near her home and was married to Charles Russ who has preceded her in death. Mrs. Moore, whose mother died when she was a small girl was reared in the Russ home. Mrs. Russ was a member of the St. Mary's Catholic church in Union City and a member of the Rosary society.

Survivors include three sisters, Mrs. Margaret Kelly and Mrs. Kate Gilfoil of Dayton; and Ms. Tom Welch of near this city; one brother, Tom Lyons of the Pastime restaurant in Union City; and several nieces and nephews.

The body was taken to the Morris Funeral home and will be returned to the Moore residence Wednesday noon where friends may call. Funeral services will be held Friday morning at 9 o'clock at the St. Mary's Catholic church in this city with Rev. Aquinas Knoff officiating. Interment will be in the Catholic cemetery near the city.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 29, 1944

County Soldier Is Killed In Action.

The war department today revealed that a Darke County soldier, Pvt. Norbert Mescher, 21, of near Osgood, has been killed in action in Northern France.

Pvt. Mescher, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mescher, who reside two miles south of Osgood, was previously reported as missing in action on July 30. A telegram received Monday by his parents stated that he had met his death on that date. No details were disclosed.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 29, 1944

Robert Scott, 27, Fatally Injured In Auto Accident.

Robert Scott, 27, 110 North Sixth street, Richmond, was fatally injured in an automobile accident which occurred Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at an intersection of two county roads one and one-forth miles south and one mile east of Lynn.

Scott, going west, collided with an automobile driven by Keith Troutwine, 19, of Lynn, who was traveling north. Both cars overturned and went into a corn field, tearing down fence and a telephone pole.

Scott received a fractured skull, a broken collar bone and other injuries and was taken to the Randolph County hospital in the Thomas ambulance of Lynn, where he died Sunday night. Troutwine received several cuts and bruises and was taken to a farm house near the scene of the accident for medical treatment. His injuries are not believed to be serious.

Sheriff Kora E. Davis investigated and stated that both cars were badly damaged.

This was the third automobile casualty occurring in Randolph county since Jan. 1, 1944.

Mr. Scott is survived by the widow, Laberta; one daughter Patricia Louise; and one son, Larry Eugene, both at home; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Scott of near Lynn; one sister, Mrs. Mildred Smith of Lynn; and a grandmother, Mrs. Lue Blansett of Lynn.

Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p. m. Wednesday at the Hopewell church with Rev. Noble Green officiating. Burial will be in the New Liberty cemetery.

Friends may call at the Thomas funeral home in Lynn until 2 p. m. Wednesday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, August 29, 1944

Janet Briggs Receives Word Of Husband's Death.

Mrs. Janet Briggs, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Russell McHatton, 412 East Franklin street, Winchester, received a telegram from the War Department Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock stating that her husband, Lieutenant George P. Briggs, was killed in action in France on Aug. 8.

The wire read as follows: Mrs. Janet Briggs, c-o McHatton, 412 E. Franklin street, Winchester, Ind.

The Secretary of War desires me to express his deep regret that your husband, Lt. George P. Briggs, was killed in action on August 8 in France. Letter follows. Signed, The Adjutant General, U. S. Army.

Mrs. Briggs and her sister, Mrs. Evelyn Dibble, left Monday morning for Brockton, Mass. To visit Lt. Brigg's parents.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 30, 1944

E. A. Stakebake Dies At Home In Winchester.

Edmund A. Stakebake, 77, a life-long resident of Randolph county, passed away at his home in Winchester at approximately 6:30 Tuesday morning after an illness of several weeks duration.

He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Evalena Martin of Muncie, Ind.; one sister, Mrs. Anna E. Daniels, of Tucson, Ariz.; two grandchildren, Mrs. Mary Jones of Winchester, and Jerry Martin of Muncie; and two great grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Summers funeral home for burial preparation where it will remain and where friends may call after 6 p. m. Tuesday.

Funeral services will be held at the funeral home at 10 o'clock Thursday morning with Rev. Leo McKinley officiating. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 30, 1944

Darke County Death.

Following a year's illness from a complication of diseases Charles H. Kendall, 85, a well known Franklin township farmer died Tuesday at his home in Painter Creek. He leaves four sons, Elmer and Vivin, both of Arcanum; Harless, of West Milton; and Lloyd of Laura, O.; one daughter, Mrs. Lester Neff, of Bradford; 21 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren Funeral services will be held Thursday at 2:30 p. m. (EWT) at the Painter Creek Church of the Brethren with the Rev. Paul E. Lantis officiating. Burial will be in Newcomers cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that Charles Henry Kendall was born Oct. 7, 1858 in Miami Co., OH, the son of James Kendall and Mary Childress (both B. in Miami Co., OH). He was a widower but his wife was Sarah Kendall. He had 11 great grandchildren. Also survived by two brothers, Omer, of Wellington, OH and Dorsey, of Greenville, OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, August 30, 1944

Darke County Death.

Homer J. Wallace, 58, dropped dead yesterday in the Bennet junior high school building, Piqua, where he was employed as custodian. His death was attributed to a coronary thrombosis. Immediate survivors include his wife, Anna; one daughter, Mrs. Gladys Brandenberry, of Careysville; a step-daughter, Mary Straker of Yorkshire; one son, Ralph who is serving with the armed forces in England. Funeral services were held Wednesday at 1:30 p. m. in Piqua and at 2:30 p. m. at the United Brethren church in Yorkshire. Burial was in the Yorkshire cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 31, 1944

Sarah Mullen Dies At Home In Union City.

Sarah Elizabeth Mullen, 74, passed away at her home, 711 West Oak street, Union City, at 8:45 p. m. Wednesday.

She was born April 2, 1870 in Madison Township, Jay county, the daughter of Adam and Sarah Ellen (Moore) Burr.

On March 27, 1890 she was married to George E. Mullen who preceded her in death May 30, 1930.

Surviving are four sons, Ray of Pontiac, Mich.; Walter of Detroit, Mich.; Daniel of Union City; and Harold of Huntsville, Ohio. Two daughters, Mrs. Velma Daughtery of Ft. Wayne and Mrs. Emma Walling of Connersville. Two sisters, Mrs. Catherine Chesterson of Indianapolis; and Mrs. Etta Sheffer of Portland. Eighteen grandchildren and eighteen great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 2 p. m. in the Ft. Recovery church. Interment in the Springhill cemetery.

The body will be returned to the residence in Union City from the Williamson funeral home in Portland, Friday morning, where friends may call.

[Three children preceded her in death; Sylvester, the eldest son, and two infant daughters.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 31, 1944

Darke County Death.

Stricken fatally by infantile paralysis was Miss Arlene Holsapple, 25, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Holsappel of Arcanum. An employe of General Motors Corporation at Moraine City. Private funeral services were held at 2:30 p. m. Thursday. Besides the parents she leaves two sisters, Mrs. Evelyn Hull, of Arcanum, and Mrs. Betty Victor, of New Madison; one brother Ronald; and three grandparents.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 31, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Carrie Mae Longfellow, 52, died unexpectedly Tuesday evening at her home in Fort Jefferson from the effects of a heart attack. She leaves her husband Alva; two daughters, Jeanette, at home, and Mrs. John Deweese of Greenville; a son, Herbert, also at home, and two grandchildren. Funeral services will be held on Friday at 2 p. m. (EWT) at the Fort Jefferson M. E. church with the Rev. Walter Nash officiating. Burial will be in Fort Jefferson cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that she was born May 2, 1892 in Darke Co., OH, the daughter of Sebastian Vietor (b. Germany) and Jane Schlechty (b. Darke Co., OH). She was also survived by two brothers, Elmer Vietor of Dayton, OH and Oscar Vietor of Savona, OH.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 31, 1944

Darke County Death.

Mrs. Rose Etta Hershey, 73, formerly of Greenville died Wednesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Walter Seabrook, in Columbus, Ohio. The only immediate survivors are the one daughter, a grandson and a granddaughter, and one great-grandchild; and a brother John W. Hart, of Greenville. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 Saturday at the Miller Funeral home in Greenville.

[Miller Funeral Home Records has no entry for this death and funeral services.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 31, 1944

Biram Thurston Dies At Home Near Lynn.

Biram F. Thurston, 23, passed away at his home three miles west of Lynn at 12:20 a. m. Wednesday after an illness of several weeks.

He was a graduate of Lynn high school in 1940 and also attended Richmond Dental college.

He leaves the widow, Nedra; the parents Mr. and Mrs. Cepol Thurston of near Lynn; one sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Halstead of near Lynn; one niece and one nephew; the grandfather, Alva Mills of Carlos; and several aunts and uncles.

The body was removed to the Thomas funeral home. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

[Funeral services were held at the New Liberty church on Saturday afternoon, with Rev. Bernice Fermer officiating. Burial was made in the adjoining cemetery.]

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, August 31, 1944

Alva Holman Dies Tuesday; Rites Friday.

Alva Holman, 53, 535 East North street, died Tuesday. He was an employe of the Anchor Hocking Glass corporation.

He is survived by his widow, Anna, and one stepson, William Vanlandingham of the U. S. army.

Friends may call at the Summers funeral home after 6 p. m. Wednesday. Funeral services will be held at Terre Haute, Friday at 2 p. m. with burial in the Highland Lawn cemetery in Terre Haute.

There will be a short service for Mr. Holman at the Summers funeral home in charge of Rev. Leo McKinley Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock for his relatives and friends here.

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