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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 1, 1941

Mrs. Cora Frist Goodrich, 80, is dead in Winchester; funeral services to be Sunday afternoon.

Mrs. Cora Frist Goodrich, 80, widow of the late James P. Goodrich, war-time governor of Indiana, died at 8:40 a. m. Friday at her home, 226 East South street, in Winchester, death following an illness of two months.

Funeral services will be conducted Sunday at 2:30 p. m. at the residence in charge of Rev. G. A. Papperman of Chicago, former pastor of the Winchester Presbyterian church, assisted by Rev. G. M. Payne, pastor. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be P. E. Goodrich, Ed S. Goodrich, W. W. Goodrich, John Goodrich, Pierre Goodrich and Edwin Middaugh. Honorary pallbearers will be Col. Richard Lieber, Dr. Amelia Keller, Rachael McDowell and Mrs. E. J. Hecker of Indianapolis, John Commons of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Miss India Brumfield and Mrs. May Kngle of Winchester.

The body will be returned to the home from the Clark and Maynard mortuary at 10 a. m. Saturday. Friends are invited to call.

Surviving are one son, Pierre, and a granddaughter, Nancy, both of Indianapolis.

Mrs. Good rich was widely known throughout the United States, having traveled extensively with her husband in an official capacity. She also spent much time in Europe, especially in Russia and Germany, and being intimate friends of former President and Mrs. Herbert Hoover, she and her husband were frequent visitors at the White House during the Hoover administration. The Hoovers also had visited at the Goodrich home in Winchester on several occasions.

Mrs. Goodrich's philanthropies were many and varied, although little publicity was given them, most recent of which was that of funds with which to build a library at Lynn, where she was born June 26, 1961.

She was a graduate of Winchester high school at an early age and for several years before her marriage was a teacher in the Winchester school. Some of the most prominent men and women in Winchester and the nation, including former senate leader, James E. Watson, were her students and her counsel was sought many times by her former pupils.

Mrs. Goodrich was a member of the Indiana Federation of Clubs; was responsible for the organization of the Caroline A. Palmer chapter, Daughters of the Union in Winchester, and at the time of her death held a state office in the organization; she was a charter member of the Woman's club; a member of the Magazine club; the Daughters of the American Revolution of which she was a past president having served in 1925-26. In 1909 she became district president of the Indiana Federation of Clubs and served for two years. She later became trustee and chairman of international relations. She was one of the founders of the endowment fund of this organization.

Probably closest to Mrs. Goodrich throughout her later life was the Madonna class of the Presbyterian church, which she founded in 1914 and continued to teach and to guide until the last few weeks.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 3, 1941

Portland, Albany men are killed in auto crackups.

Portland, Ind., Nov. 2. --- (Special) --- Two persons were killed and five were injured, three seriously, in three automobile accidents west of Portland late Saturday night and early Sunday morning.

The dead are: Douglas Carl (Doug) Gillum, 40, son of William Moses Gillum, of 116 East Lafayette street, Portland. Franklin Earl Simon, 22, of North Plum street, Albany. He was the ninth resident of that little town to meet death in an automobile accident this year. Both were drivers for the Crane Trucking company of Albany.

Gillum was instantly killed at 3:15 a. m. Sunday when a new Chrysler Imperial coupe, owned and driven by Ralph Reed, 26, of Richmond, Va., and formerly of Pennville, traveling eastward at a speed estimated at 90 miles an hour, struck the guard railing along the right side of state highway 67 at Detamore, 2 � miles west of Portland, and, after careening for a distance of 80 feet, was demolished against the iron bridge that spans the Salmonie river. A latticed iron beam, 16 inches wide, torn loose from the bridge by the impact, passed entirely through the car lengthwise, penetrating Gillum's body below the waist and mangling him horribly.

Simon died of a broken neck a half hour after the crash at the Jay County hospital, where he was taken with Gillum's body in the Williamson & Sons ambulance. His chest was crushed and his right leg broken.

Mrs. Reed, the former Miss Peggy Burgess of Hartford City, the fourth person on the one seat of the speeding coupe when the crash came, was taken to the hospital with her husband in the Baird ambulance. She suffered a compound fracture of both legs below the knees and head laceration while he was attended for lacerations of the neck and scalp, possible internal injuries and shock. The attending surgeon indicated she probably would recover.

Reed is as son of Mr. and Mrs. Don Reed of Pennville and with his wife, a bride of about a year, has been spending a vacation from his work in a powder plant near Richmond, Va. Mrs. Reed is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clay Burgess of Hartford City, formerly of Pennville and Portland.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, November 4, 1941

Local woman's father dies at Ladoga.

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Caplinger and family, North Columbia street, Union City, were called Monday to Ladoga by the death Sunday night of Mrs. Caplinger's father, John F. Alfrey, 78.

Mr. Alfrey, ill for some time, had been confined to the hospital for the past month. He was a lifelong member and worker in the Disciple Christian church, of which he was a elder at the time of his death. He also was instrumental in the building of the Byron Christian church.

Surviving are five children, Mrs. B. W. Carrier, of Hammond; Henry Alfrey, of Gary; Fred Alfrey, of Logansport; Kathyrn Alfrey, at home, and Mrs. C. O. Caplinger, Union City; three sisters, Mrs. Sadie Smock, of Ft. Wayne, Mrs. Rachel Crabb, of Little Rock, Ark., and Mrs. Susie Smith, of Alamo; 13 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, November 4, 1941

Former local woman dies at Dayton, O.

A former resident of Union City, Mrs. Ralph (Florence) Maloon, 25, died Sunday at 6:45 p. m. in the St. Elizabeth hospital, in Dayton, O., following an illness of 10 months.

Mr. and Mrs. Maloon left Union City two years ago. The deceased was born in Bryne, O., and later lived in Springfield, O.

Surviving besides the husband, are a son, Donald, both at home; her mother Mrs. Helen Fitzgerald; her step-father, and two step-brothers, Richard and Donald, all of Springfield, O.

Funeral services will be conducted at 2:30 p. m. (EST) today in Dayton. Burial will be in the Dayton Memorial Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, November 4, 1941

Mrs. F. Adkins, 80, succumbs.

Mrs. Finley Adkins, 80, died at 7:30 a. m. Monday at her residence, 302 North street, Union City. Born in Ohio on July 7, 1861, she had been a lifelong resident of the Union City community.

She was born Caroline, daughter of John P. and Anna Elizabeth (Schneider) Walker. In a second marriage for both, she was wed to Finley Adkins in June, 1930, in Union City. She was a member of the Union City Christian church.

Surviving besides the husband, are two sons, R. A. Culbertson, of Bloomington, and U. C. Culbertson, of Calumet; one brother, Earl Martindale, and one sister, Mrs. Mary C. Smith, both of Bradford, and three half-brothers, William Walker, of Flint, Mich.; Sullivan Walker, of Saginaw, Mich., and Alva Walker, of Union City rural route.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday at 9 a. m. (CST) in the Union City United Brethren church with Rev. R. B. Ditmyer officiating. Burial will be in the Vincennes cemetery.

The body will be returned from the Brooks funeral home in Union City this morning to the residence on North street where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 5, 1941

Wayne Twp. native dies in Tennessee.

Rev. S. F. Harter, of Union City, has received word of the death on October 19, of Harry Jacobs, native of Wayne township, Randolph county, which occurred at his home in Tennessee.

Mr. Jacobs was born six miles south of Union City and attended the Old No. 9 school. During the past summer when the Wayne township school reunion was held, Mr. Jacobs was visiting relatives at Bryant. He was an inveterate bicyclist, having ridden during his lifetime more than seventy-five thousand miles, and rode his bicycle from Bryant to attend the reunion.

He is survived by his widow and several relatives in this vicinity.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, November 6, 1941

Richard Johnson rites Thursday at Muncie; dies near Winchester.

Muncie, Ind., Nov. 5. --- Funeral services for Richard Leroy Johnson, 21, who died at 9:30 p. m Tuesday at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Eli Johnson, five miles southwest of Winchester, will be conducted at 1:30 p. m. Thursday at the Christian and Missionary Alliance church, 512 West Howard street. Burial will be in Mt. Tabor cemetery. Friends may call at the Meeks mortuary.

Mr. Johnson's death followed an extended illness. He was a member of the Christian and Missionary Alliance church. Surviving are the father, Herschel S. Johnson of Muncie; the mother, Mrs. Maude Hite of Muncie; a brother, Nevin Johnson of Muncie; two sisters, Mrs. Janice Armstrong and Mrs. Alice Hart, both of Muncie, and the grandparents, Mrs. Anna Grindle of Union City and Mr. and Mrs. Johnson.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 7, 1941

Kerst last rites set for Saturday.

Virgil O. Kerst, 60 years old, a member of the Darke county AAA committee, died at 3:15 p. m. Wednesday at his home, five miles west of Greenville from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy he suffered Monday evening. He never regained consciousness.

The deceased, a lifelong resident of Darke county, was a prominent farmer. His father was the late Aaron Kerst.

Surviving are his wife, Irene; two daughters, Mary E. and Donna L., both of Columbus; a brother, Howard, of Greenville and a sister, Marts. A. H. Halley, of Dayton.

Funeral services will be conducted at the Miller Funeral Home, Greenville, at 2 p. m. Saturday with Rev. Earl Lantz, of Union City officiating. Burial will be in Greenville cemetery.

(Miller Funeral Home Records state that Virgil Oliver Kerst was born Jan. 22, 1881 in Washington Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of Aaron Kerst and Eleanor Steele.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 7, 1941

Heart trouble said cause Schroder death.

Henry Schroder, 74, dropped dead at 11:15 a. m. Thursday at his home on Greenville rural route 2, immediately east of the Greenville city corporation limits. His death was attributed to a heart attack.

Mr. Schroder, a native of German, had lived in this vicinity for the last 58 years. He was a very devout member of St. John's Lutheran church.

Surviving are a wife, Cora; one foster-daughter, Mrs. Minneman, of Dayton; a nephew and one niece.

The body has been removed to the Stocker funeral home, Greenville, but no burial arrangements have been completed.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 7, 1941

Plan Meredith rites Saturday at home; burial at Columbia City.

Funeral services for Ray S. Meredith, 52, advertising and business manager of the Union City Times-Gazette and a prominent figure in the civic endeavors of the community, will be held Saturday at 1 p. m. (CST) at the residence, 204 West Division street, Union City.

His death, which occurred at 12:30 a. m. Thursday at his home, came suddenly and with a distinct shock to the community in which he held the love and respect of countless friends among both the adult and youthful citizenry. His illness of two weeks' duration followed a heart attack.

Mr. Meredith was born in Columbia City on September 24, 1889, the son of J. H. and Ida (Cullison) Meredith. He attended the Columbia City schools and on May 21, 1911, was united in marriage with Hazel Morgan. He was employed by the Morris Five-and-Ten Cent stores and later owned a chain of similar establishments. Before accepting the newspaper managerial post in Union City in 1934, he served as mayor of Plymouth, taking office in 1930. Following that he was employed by the Bursley company, wholesale grocers.

The deceased was a member of the Union City Christian church, where he taught a boys' Sunday school class, known as "Ray's class." At the time of his death he was an active Mason, Rotarian, member of the Elks lodge and was serving as commissioner of the Union City district of the Whitewater Valley council of the Boy Scouts of America, the revitalization of which he had greatly assisted in Union City. He also had served in past years in various official capacities in such civic organizations as the Music Booster club, Chamber of Commerce, Red Cross and Community Chest.

Surviving, besides the widow, Hazel, are three children, Mrs. S. A. (Joy) Foust of Las Cruces, New Mexico, Tom Meredith of Union City and John Ray at home; one sister, Miss Gertrude Meredith, of Columbia City, and two grandchildren, Tommy Joe and Ray Cleon, both of Las Cruces.

Rev. Ben Holryd, pastor of the Union City Christian church, will officiate at the services Saturday, immediately following which the funeral cortege will leave for Columbia City. There the body will lie in state at the Luchenbill and Son funeral home where services will be conducted at 1 p. m. Sunday. Burial will follow in the South Side Park cemetery, Columbia City.

In Union City the remains will be returned from the Brooks funeral home to the residence at 10 o'clock Friday morning, after which time friends may call.

Pallbearers will be Philip Hindsley, James J. Patchell, Lucian Summers, Fred Caron and Bedford Butcher, all of Union City, and Robert M. Kist, of Winchester.

Members of the Union City B.P.O.E. will conduct a lodge of sorrow at 7 o'clock Friday night at the residence. Brief graveside services will be performed by the Masonic order in Columbia City.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 8, 1941

Pat Davis, the 'pop corn man', dies at his home in Winchester.

Orla Lou (Pat) Davis, 53, died suddenly at 4 p. m. Friday at his home, 229 East Franklin street, Winchester. Death is believed to have been caused by a heart attack. The body was discovered by one of his sons.

Afflicted with a bone disease while a young man, which necessitated amputation of an arm and a leg, Mr. Davis despite these adversities provided for a large family, became clerk-treasurer, of Winchester during the administration of Mayor John P. Clark and was regarded as a successful business man.

Known far and wide in Democratic party circles, Mr. Davis was also renowned in eastern Indiana and western Ohio for his "Pat's" pop corn which he dispensed on the east side of the courthouse square. Although an ardent Democrat, his counsel was sought by members of both parties on political questions.

Surviving are the wife, Estrella, clerk-treasurer of Winchester, three sons, Leland Bruce, John Albert and Robert Earl, and two daughters, Mrs. Mary O. Keys and Alice Janet Davis, all of Winchester; four grandchildren; the father, James A. Davis of Brechenridge, Mich.; and five brothers, Earl of Winchester, Uriah and Charles of Park Ridge, Ill., Russell of Chicago, and Raymond of Newark, Ohio.

The body was removed to the Clark and Maynard funeral home, where last rites will be conducted Sunday at 2 p. m. , with Rev. Raymond D. Harris in charge. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home after 12 o'clock Saturday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 8, 1941

Death claims Otto Lacey, 58.

Otto Clarence Lacey, 58, died suddenly at 10 p. m. Thursday at his home 719 � West Oak street, Union City. Until about six years ago he was a resident of Lynn.

Survivors are the widow, Ida E.; one daughter, Mrs. Phillip Livingston of Union City; three sons, James G. Lacey of Hartford City, Delbert Lacey of Camp Shelby, Miss., and Dudley Lacey of Windfall; one brother, Ira Lacey of Oakland, Cal. Five grandchildren also survive.

The body was removed to the Thomas funeral home in Lynn and will be taken to the late residence Saturday noon where friends may call.

Funeral services will be held Monday at 2 p. m. at the Spartanburg Methodist church in charge of Rev. L. F. Ulmer of Converse. Interment will be in the Spartanburg cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 8, 1941

Deaths of man and woman raise county victims to 10. - Big Four train hits automobile. - Roll Warren, 65, dies of injuries suffered on 24th of October.

Death of two persons Friday brought the Randolph county automobile accident death toll to ten.

Killed outright in a train-auto crash east of Winchester was Mrs. Eleanor Sothard, 42, of 833 East Charles street, Muncie, while Roll H. Warren, 65, died in the Randolph County hospital of injuries suffered in a car-truck crash at Five Points north of Winchester on October 24.

The southbound 1941 Pontiac sedan operated by Mr. Sothand was truck at the Guy Cox road crossing, three miles east of Winchester, by the Big Four's Southwestern Limited passenger which was running more than an hour late. It was due in Winchester at 10:20 a. m. The machine was carried for more than half a mile.

Mrs. Sothard, whose injuries consisted of a skull and multiple body fractures, was working in Randolph county obtaining subscription for magazines, proceeds of which were to be used to purchase fracture beds as a project of the Winchester Business and Professional Women's club. She was manager of the crew sent here by the Crowell-Collier Publishing company, and was working out of Muncie.]

Engineer of the train was H. E. Hancock of Indianapolis; conductor, C. C. Combs of Bellefontaine, Ohio.

Mrs. Sothard's body was taken to the Summers funeral home in Winchester. Sheriff Kora E. Davis, Deputy Lester Puterbaugh and Dr. Lowell W. Painter, county coroner, investigated.

Mrs. Sothard had no known relatives.

Last rites will be conducted Monday at 2 p. m. at the Summers funeral home with burial in Fountain Park cemetery.

Mr. Warren, tenth Randolph county automobile accident fatality of 1941, died in the Winchester hospital at 1 p. m. He was injured in an accident at Five Points which sent three persons, including Mrs. Warren, to the hospital for treatment. His wife sustained a shattered fracture of her left forearm, while Eizsa Romans of Williamstown, Ky., driver of a Model A. Ford truck, suffered fractured ribs and a lacerated scalp.

Uninjured in the accident were Maurice Warren, driving his father's car, and Allie Burgess of Williamstown, driver of Romans' light truck.

Mr. Warren is survived by the wife; four sons, Wallace and Wayne of Ridgeville, Maurice at home and Paul of Winchester; two daughters, Mrs. Clara Schlecty of Saratoga and Mrs. Jessie Nealis of Muncie; three brothers, Mel Warren of Saratoga, Russell Warren of Hamlet and John Lewis of Union City; one sister, Mrs. Ada Sipe of Saratoga, and 11 grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Middleton funeral home at Ridgeville and will be taken to the home, four miles northwest of Saratoga, Saturday evening.

Funeral services will be conducted Sunday at 2 p. m. at the Saratoga Methodist church. Burial will be in the Weimer cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 10, 1941

Mrs. E. A. Diehl is dead in California.

Word was received here Sunday of the death of Mrs. E. A. Diehl, former resident of Randolph county, at her home in Los Angeles, Cal. Death occurred Saturday after a long illness.

Mrs. Diehl was born and raised near Harrisville and had lived in California for several years.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 10, 1941

Bragg rites are Tuesday at 2.

Mrs. Bessie (Jennings) Bragg, 54, wife of Pierre Bragg, former manager of the Winchester branch of the auto license bureau, died Saturday at 6:30 p. m. at her home near Shady Nook, east of Winchester. Death followed a lingering illness.

Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday at 2 p. m. at the Winchester Friends church in charge of Rev. William Sayers of Muncie, assisted by Revs. George Addington of Farmland and Aaron Napier of Winchester. Burial will be in the Buena Vista cemetery.

The body was returned Sunday morning to the residence from the Clark and Maynard funeral home in Winchester.

Surviving, other than the husband, are one son, Everett Moyer of Richmond; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nate Jennings of Richmond; three brothers, Fred and Perry of Winchester and Ray of Richmond, and one sister, Miss Mabel Jennings of Richmond.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 12, 1941

Harmon rites are Wednesday.

Funeral services for Ed J. Harmon, 61, who died Monday at 7:30 a. m. at his home in Stone Station, will be conducted Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Clear Creek Christian church in charge of Rev. George Addington of Farmland, assisted by Rev. Zelma Mills. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

The body was removed Tuesday evening from the Clark and Maynard funeral home to the residence, where friends may call.

Mr. Harmon died after a lingering illness.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Blanche Bousman of Ridgeville and Mrs. Doris Louise Mosler, south of Winchester; two brothers, George of Union City and Victor of Saratoga, and seven grandchildren.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 12, 1941

Paschal infant dies at home near Union City.

Carie Ellen Paschal, one month old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Paschal, Union City rural route 2, died at the family residence Monday at 2 a. m.

Surviving besides the parents is one sister, Mary Jane Paschal, at home.

The family left Tuesday from the Fraze funeral home in Union City for Jefferson City, Tenn. where funeral services will be held and interment made.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, November 13, 1941

Coletown widow passes away.

Mrs. Flora Chenoweth, 86, widow of the late Benjamin F. Chenoweth, died at 3:30 a. m. Wednesday at her home in Coletown. She had been critically ill for the last nine days.

Mrs. Chenoweth, a lifelong resident of Darke county, was born near Sharpeye in Washington township. Her parents were Joseph and Sarah Cole.

Surviving are one son, Jesse, of Wauseon, Ohio; a grandson; two brothers, Charles Cole, of Palestine and Ben Cole, of Greenville rural route 4, and a sister, Mrs. Mary C. Cole, of Coletown.

Funeral services will be held at the Coletown Christian church at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon. Rev. Arthur Lehman will officiate.

Burial will be in the Sharpeye cemetery.

Friends may call at the Chenoweth residence after 10 a. m. today.

(Miller Funeral Home Records state that Flora A. Chenoweth was born March 26, 1855 in Washington Twp., Darke Co., OH, the daughter of Joseph Cole and Sarah Ann Shively, both also born in Washington Twp.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 14, 1941

Aurelia Climer, 80, passes away.

Mrs. Aurelia Florence Climer, 80, widow of the late D. W. Climer, died suddenly at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Cyrus Johnson, south of Lynn, Thursday morning.

Surviving are five daughters, Mrs. Ada Nelson of Rocky River, Ohio, Mrs. Bessie Kelley of Winchester, Mrs. Nellie Mason of near Ridgeville, Mrs. Hazel Macy of Union City, and Mrs. Clara Johnson of near Lynn, at whose home death occurred; three sons, Fred W. Climer of Akron, Ohio, Joe H. Climer of Ypsilanti, Mich., and Ed N. Climer of Jackson, Mich.; three sisters, Mrs. Nellie Rothe, Mrs. Lillie McNeal and Mrs. Grace Marsh, all of Chillicothe, Ohio; one brother, Thad S. Hanson of Chillicothe, Ohio; 21 grandchildren, three great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

Private funeral services will be conducted at the hoe of the daughter, Mrs. Kelley, 515 South Meridian street in Winchester Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, with Rev. G. M. Payne in charge. Interment will be in Fountain Park cemetery at Winchester.

Friends may call at the Kelley residence after 10 a. m. Friday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 14, 1941

Martha J. Smith, Randolph native, claimed by death.

Martha Jane Smith, 88, lifelong resident of Randolph county, died at her home, five miles north of Union City in Jackson township near the state line, at 4:45 p. m. Thursday. Death followed an illness of two weeks. She had been in critical condition for the last two days.

Mrs. Smith was born October 3, 1853 in Jackson township, the daughter of George and Margaret (Lambert) Sell. On Christmas eve of 1874 she was married to Noah S. Smith, who died in Union City on July 18, 1931

Surviving are two sons, Troy Smith of West Lafayette, former principal of Portland high school, and Willard M. Smith, at home; one brother, William K. Sell of Union City, and one sister, Mrs. Walter Hartley of near Pennville; eight grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. Preceding her in death, other than the husband, were a daughter and a son, four sisters and four brothers.

Funeral services will be conducted Sunday at 1:30 p. m. at the Lisbon church northwest of Union City in charge of Rev. Earl Lantz. Burial will be in the Lisbon cemetery.

The body will be returned to the home Friday evening from the Williamson & Son mortuary at Portland.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 14, 1941

Glen Lindley, 31, dies in Detroit.

Glen Lindley, 31, former resident of Randolph county south of Salem, died suddenly Thursday at 5:30 a. m. in Detroit, Mich., where he had lived for two years.

The deceased was born in June of 1910 in Randolph county, the son of William and Christina (Prescott) Lindley. He had visited his parents in Salamonia two weeks ago.

Surviving are the widow, the parents, two brothers, Cloyd of Anderson, Walker of south of Salem, two sisters, Juanita of Winchester and Ruby, wife of Dr. Dale Harvey of Bellefontaine, O., and a grandmother, Mrs. Dan Lindley of near Union City.

William, Cloyd, Juanita and Mr. and Mrs. Walker Lindley left for Detroit Thursday noon. The body will be returned to the Williamson & Son funeral home in Portland Friday or Saturday. Funeral services will be announced later.

(Funeral services were held on Saturday afternoon at the Pleasant Hill church on the Randolph-Jay county line, Rev. H. G. Perry of Salamonia officiated. Burial was made in the Pleasant Hill cemetery.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 14, 1941

Clara Starr Dies at Daughter's Home.

Mrs. Clara Starr, widow of the late Frank Starr, died at 10:30 a. m. Thursday at the home of Mrs. John Gibson, one mile south of Rossburg. She had been in failing health for an extended period.

Funeral services have been tentatively set for 2 p. m. Saturday at the Rossburg U. B. church. Burial will be in the Holsapple cemetery.

Friends may call at the Gibson residence.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 17, 1941

Darke Co. Co-op driver killed at Pikesville.

Grant Arnold, 27, Greenville truck driver, was instantly killed Saturday afternoon when the truck he was driving was struck by a passenger train at the crossing at Pikesville, five miles north of Greenville on Ohio-127.

Mr. Arnold, who lived at 320 East Fifth street, was driving a truck owned by the Greenville Co-Operative dairy, where he had been employed for several years. He was well known in Union City.

An eastbound train struck the truck, which was going south toward Greenville. Darke county Sheriff Deputies, Tom McBay and Oeo Dickey investigated the accident.

Survivors include the wife, Mrs. Sylvia Arnold; the mother, Mrs. Emma Arnold, Anderson avenue, Greenville; seven sisters, Mrs. Ruth Stocksdale of Hillgrove, O.; Mrs. John Livingston, of Dayton; Mrs. Jack Geragosias, of Cleveland; Mrs. Willard Spitler and Mrs. Frank Midland, of Phillipsburg, Ohio; Mrs. David Banata of Graysville, Ohio, and Miss Helen Arnold, at home, and one brother, Arthur Arnold, of Greenville.

Funeral arrangements will be announced.

(Funeral services were held on Tuesday at the Stocker Funeral Home in Greenville. Burial was made in the Coletown cemetery.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 17, 1941

Mrs. Wm. Smock dies suddenly.

Mrs. William Smock, 21, Randolph county native, died Saturday at 6 a. m. at the residence of her mother and step-father, Mr. and Mrs. Baker Johnson, just off Division street, Union City, O. She had been seriously ill for one week.

She was born Helen Irene in southern Randolph county on October 9, 1920, attended the Lynn schools and was a member of the Friends church at Rural. On August 11, 1937, she was united in marriage with William Smock, near Winchester. About one year ago she came to the Union City community to make her home.

Surviving, besides the husband, William, are two children, William Benjamin, 3 years, and Richard Lee, 1 year; one sister, Mrs. Clarence Nelson, of Jonesboro, and her mother and step-father, Mr. and Mrs. Baker Johnson, of Union City.

Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p. m. today in the Union City Nazarene church, with Rev. Elvin Thornburg officiating, assisted by Rev. Ralph Yaney. Burial will be in the Winchester Fountain Park cemetery.

The body was removed from the Fraze funeral home in Union City Sunday morning to the Albert Bragg residence, 538 West Pearl street, Union City, where friends may call until the hour of the service.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, November 18, 1941

C. I. Williamson, former mayor, passes away.

Charles I. Williamson, 69, former mayor of Union City, Indiana, and retired American Railway express agent, died shortly before midnight Sunday at his residence, 218 South Columbia street, Union City. He had been ill for the past ten years.

He was born south of Union City in Wayne township on April 9, 1872, the son of Isaac Newton and Sara (Parent) Williamson. He later moved to Union City where he was graduated from the Union City East Side school. He attended Richmond Business college and studied law, passing the bar examination. However, he never practiced as an attorney.

Mr. Williamson became the Union City agent for the American Railway express about 1895 and continued in that capacity for 36 years, retiring because of ill health about 10 years ago. He was active in Republican party politics in the community, serving as township and city chairman on various occasions. He was first elected mayor of Union City, Indiana, to take office in 1906 and serving until 1910. Under his administration the southwest system sewer was built and considerable paving of streets was accomplished.

On January 17, 1914, he was united in marriage with Bessie Pearl Naderman in the Union City Christian church. Again receiving the nomination for mayor, he was again elected and took office in 1930. He resigned in July, 1933, because of ill health and was succeeded by O. G. Gist, who completed the term.

Mr. Williamson was a member of the Union City Christian church and the Masonic order.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday at 2 p. m. in the Brooks funeral home, North Union street, Union City, with Rev. Russell Grubbs, of Converse, former pastor of the New Lisbon church, officiating. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery.

The body will lie in state at the Brooks funeral home where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, November 18, 1941

Daisy C. Downing claimed by death.

Mrs. Daisy Clementine Downing, 60, died at 5:30 p. m. Monday at her home one-half mile west of Stone Station. Death followed a lingering illness.

Surviving are the husband, Charles; one daughter, Mrs. Orla Byrum of Saratoga; one sister, Mrs. Molly Boyd of Ansonia, Ohio; four brothers, Ora Goodman of Winchester, Orva Goodman of Union City, Joe Goodman of Winchester and Harry Goodman of Piqua, Ohio.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday at 11 a. m. at the Polingtown church in charge of Rev. Leo McKinley of Winchester. Burial will be in the Pennville cemetery.

The body will be returned to the home from the Summers mortuary in Winchester at 5 p. m. Tuesday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 19, 1941

Ella Hitchcock claimed by death.

Ella (Friddle) Hitchcock, 77, wife of John Hitchcock, died at her home two and one-half miles south of Winchester at 7:30 p. m. Tuesday.

The body was taken to the Clark and Maynard funeral home for burial preparation and will remain there for the last rites which will be in charge of Rev. Herbert Boase, pastor of the Methodist church. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery. Time of the funeral had not been arranged last night.

Surviving, other than the husband, are six sons, Perry of Farmland, Covert of Richmond, Lieut. Col. Robinson of Indianapolis, state selective service director, Frederick of Bloomington, Carroll and Frank of Winchester; three daughters, Mrs. Vernon Stout of Mansfield, Ohio, Mrs. Herschell Stonerock of Richmond and Mrs. Fred Lenkensdofer of Winchester; three brothers, Otto and Max Friddle of Redkey and Oscar Friddle of Dunkirk; four sisters, Odna Goodwin and Mrs. Idella Manor of Muncie, Mrs. Lola Manor of Redkey and Founa Cecil of Warren, 22 grandchildren and five great grandchildren.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 19, 1941

Harry W. Dunn dies in Saratoga.

Harry W. Dunn, 59, died Tuesday morning at 4:30 o'clock at his home at Saratoga, death following six months' illness. He was a retired farmer, and had resided at Saratoga for 31 years.

Surviving are the wife, Orpha; one daughter, Mrs. Ed Cummings of near Union City; one grandson, Jackie Cummings and two sisters, Mrs. Albert Hart of Union City and Mrs. Charles Smith of Springfield, Ohio.

Funeral services will be conducted Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence, with Rev. Earl Lantz in charge. Cremation will follow.

The body was removed Tuesday evening from the Fraze funeral home in Winchester to the residence. Friends are requested to omit flowers.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 19, 1941

Death claims prominent Greenville man.

George A. Katzenberger, 73, president of Second National bank and vice-president of the Building and Loan association, one of Greenville's and Darke county's most prominent men died in the Wayne hospital at Greenville Tuesday at 7 p. m. Death came 48 hours after he had been admitted and was due to a heart ailment.

For 43 years, Mr. Katzenberger had been an officer of the building and loan association and for more than a half century had played an active and prominent part in Greenville civic and business circles.

He was a member of the vestry of the St. Paul's Episcopal church, charter member of the Greenville Rotary club, one of the organizers of Matchette council, R. & S. M. and recorder of the Masonic order for 13 years, was first secretary of the Greenville Public Health association, had been a contributor of legal articles for the Chicago Law Journal and Michigan Law Review, was a charter member of both the Greenville Historical and Greenville Philatelic societies.

Mr. Katzenberger was born in Greenville in December of 1867, the son of Charles L. and Elizabeth (Ashman) Katzenberger. He was a graduate of the University of Michigan and had attended Heidelberg university in German.

Surviving are the wife, Grace Miesse; one daughter, Miss Martha Katzenberger at home; and two sons, George, Jr., and Charles on the Pacific coast.

Friends may call at the Turpen-McKnight funeral home on West Fourth street in Greenville until 9:30 a. m. Thursday when the body will be taken to the residence on West Main street where private funeral services will be held. Friends are requested to send no flowers.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 19, 1941

Death claims A. D. Puderbaugh.

A victim of tuberculosis, Allwyn Dale Puderbaugh, 24, died Tuesday at 1:15 p. m. at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Puderbaugh, 324 North Walnut street, Union City, O. He had been sick for the past year and seriously ill for the last three weeks.

The deceased was born in North Star, O., on February 10, 1917, coming to the Union City community when about 10 years of age. He was graduated from the Union City East Side high school with the class of 1935. He attended the Union City Church of the Brethren.

Surviving besides the parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Puderbaugh, are the following brothers and sisters: Gradon Puderbaugh and Mrs. Cecil (Juanita) Stephens, both of Dayton, O.; Mrs. Victor (Winona) McCarter, Mrs. Herman (Averal) Wenger and Mrs. Hubert (Arlene) Van Skyock, all of Union City; Eloise, Keith, Margene, Max and T. W. Puderbaugh, all at home.

Funeral services will be conducted Friday at 1:30 p. m. (CST) at the residence, with Rev. D. G. Berkebile officiating. Burial will be in the Brethren cemetery, north of Union City.

The body will be returned from the Brooks funeral home in Union City to the Puderbaugh residence on Walnut street this evening, after which time friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 21, 1941

Death claim home matron.

Mrs. Pearl C. Leatherman, 56, widow of the late Rev. R. N. Leatherman, former pastor of the Union City Church of the Brethren and well known evangelist, died Sunday at 6:25 a. m at the home of a son, J. R. Leatherman, Grand apartments, West Pearl street, Union City. Death followed complications resulting from a serious illness of only two weeks.

Following the death of her husband, about five years ago, Mrs. Leatherman went to North Manchester where she was the matron of the Brethren home in that city. She continued in that capacity until her health failed a few weeks ago, at which time she returned to Union City.

Mrs. Leatherman was born near Girard Ill., on December 7, 1894, the daughter of Jacob and Elma (Neher) Shutt. She attended the schools in that community. On March 24, 1912, she was united in marriage with Rev. R. N. Leatherman in Chicago, Ill. She was a member of the Union City Church of the Brethren and the societies within the church.

Surviving are four children, Mrs. Elizabeth Hood, of Mobile, Ala.; Drue Leatherman of Union City; J. R. and Paul, both of Union City, but at present employed in defense work at Birmingham, Ala., and Miss Mary Catherine Leatherman, of Chicago; three brothers, Albert Shutt, of Springfield, Ill.; Victor Shutt, of Girard, Ill., and Herbert Shutt, of Detroit, Mich.; one sister, Mrs. Beulah Shaw, of Des Moines, Ia., and one grandchild.

Funeral services will be conducted Sunday at 1 p. m. (CST) in the Union City Church of the Brethren, with Rev. D. G. Berkebile officiating. Burial will be in the Donald's cemetery, near Springfield, O.

The body will remain until the hour of the services at the Fraze funeral home, West Pearl street, Union City, where friends may call after 5 o'clock this evening.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 21, 1941

James Alexander, 86, passes away.

In failing health for a year and seriously ill for the past four weeks, James U. Alexander, 86, died at 11:30 a. m. Thursday at his home one and one-half miles southeast of New Pittburg. Death was due to infirmities of age.

Mr. Alexander moved to Randolph from Preble county, Ohio, with his parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (Roberts) Alexander, when nine months old, was educated in Randolph county schools and was a farmer. He was born August 19, 1855. On August 11, 1879 he was married to Sarah Alice Stump, who died 18 years ago.

Surviving are eight children, Della, wife of Rev. R. A. Walling of Ridgeville route 3, Dessie Alexander at home, Lola, wife of Howard Spencer of Dunkirk, Clara, wife of George Fowler of Union City route 2, Harley of Anderson, Perry of Hamilton, Ohio, Samuel of Fort Wayne and Clyde of Union City route 2.

Brother and sisters are Samuel of Fountain City, Nettie, wife of Fred Roe of Union City, and Mrs. Mary DeLand of White Hill, Ill. There are 27 grandchildren and 18 great grandchildren. Preceding her in death were the husband, a son, a daughter, two sisters and a brother.

Funeral services will be conducted Sunday at 2 p. m. at Praise Chapel in charge of the pastor, Rev. Carl Kilmer. Burial will be in the New Pittsburg cemetery.

The body will be returned to the residence Saturday from the Williamson & Son funeral home in Portland.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, November 21, 1941

Death claims Minnie Swallow.

Minnie C. Swallow, 79, of Union City route 3, died at 2:30 a. m. Thursday at her home four miles northeast of Union City, death being due to infirmities of age. She had been in failing health five months and seriously ill for five days.

Mrs. Swallow was born in Darke county on June 25, 1862, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wolter. On February 20, 1883 she was married to James R. Swallow, who died January 6, 1926.

Surviving are four sons, Eugene of north of Union City, John at home, Noah of northeast of Union City and Ralph of Muncie; one sister, Mary Lindemuth of Greenville, and five grandchildren. Preceding her in death, other than the husband, were a daughter, a son, three brothers and a sister.

Funeral services will be conducted Saturday at 1:30 p. m. in the Lisbon church in charge of Rev. H. A. Barth of Union City. Burial will be in the Lisbon cemetery. The body was returned to the residence Thursday afternoon from the Williamson & Son funeral home in Portland.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 22, 1941

Fall is fatal to J. M. Teaford.

Injuries which he sustained last Monday in a fall from a tree while hunting raccoons on his farm near Nashville, caused the death of J. Murray Teaford, 60, at 4 a. m. Friday at Wayne hospital, Greenville.

In the fall Teaford sustained a broken back which paralyzed him from the hips down. He is said to have laid under the tree for more than two hours before being found by a searching party of neighbors summoned by his wife.

The accident occurred at about 6 a. m. Monday after Teaford had treed a 'coon. He was climbing into the tree when a limb broke hurling him to the ground.

The accident victim, a lifelong resident of Darke county, was born near Palestine. His parents were the late George and Catherine (Benson) Teaford.

He was a member of the Central Avenue Church of the Brethren, Greenville.

Surviving are his wife, Emma; three brothers, J. E. Teaford, Union City; M. A. Teaford, Palestine and O. J. Teaford, Richmond, and two sisters, Mrs. Lottie May Moss of Richmond and Mrs. Delilah Ann Alexander, of Hollansburg.

The body, which was removed to the Turpen-McKnight funeral home, Greenville, will be returned to the Teaford residence, four and one-half miles west of Greenville on the Nashville road, at none today.

Funeral services will be conducted from the residence at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial will be in the Abbottsville cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 24, 1941

Death claims Charles Shaffer.

Charles Shaffer, 80, farmer, died at his home six miles northeast of Farmland Sunday at 2:30 p. m. Residing on the farm where he died for the past 54 years, he had bee in failing health for some time and bedfast for four months.

Surviving are the wife, Melvina; three daughters, Mrs. Ina Deboy of near Ridgeville, Mrs. Bertha Garringer of near Farmland and Mrs. Della Sumwalt of Warren; seven sons, Albert, Ernest and Freddie of and near Ridgeville, Emerson of Redkey, Rev. G. H. of near Muncie, Rev. O. W. of Hagerstown and Paul at home, and one sister, Mrs. Mary Conn of Albany.

Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday at 1:30 p. m. at the Hopewell church with burial in the adjoining cemetery. The body will be returned Monday afternoon to the residence from the Thornburg funeral home in Farmland.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 24, 1941

Aged Union City attorney dies; funeral Tuesday.

William W. Fowler, 90, of 408 North State Line street, one of the oldest practicing lawyers of western Ohio and eastern Indiana, died at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon in the Greenville hospital.

Mr. Fowler, who practiced law in both Indiana and Ohio, had been in failing health for the last four years and seriously ill for the last four months.

Foe eighteen years a school teacher in the two states, he quit that profession to practice law, his work for the last forty-four years. He was a former Union City, O., city attorney and city clerk and was a member of the Masonic lodge.

Surviving are the widow, Ella, and two half-brothers, Edward Fowler of Union City and Frank Fowler of Preston, Minn. The body was removed to the Fraze funeral home, where friends may call until 4 o'clock Monday afternoon.

Funeral services will be conducted at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Fraze chapel, Rev. Ben Holroyd officiating, assisted by members of the Masonic lodge. Burial will be in Union City cemetery. The casket will not be opened during the services.

(A Memorial article published Nov. 28th stated that he was a son of the late Hanson T. and Sarah (Livengood) Fowler, He was born on what is known as the Fowler homestead, one mile south of Union City. He attended the East Side high school and has the distinction of being one of the first graduates of that school. Following his graduation, Mr. Fowler taught school in the rural districts surrounding Union City for 18 years. No birth date was given.)

(Another Memorial article published Nov. 29th stated that his birth date was November 5, 1851. He was married May 31, 1879 in Union City, Ohio to Miss Ella M. Brumbaugh. To this union were born two sons: Hanson Leonidas, who died Sept. 6, 1880 at the age of 20 days; and Hanson T. who died at Columbus, Ohio, Feb. 8, 1936, at the age of 54 years.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 24, 1941

Stillborn son to be buried on Monday.

Funeral services for Charles Douglas, son stillborn to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wooters at Ridgeville Saturday night, will be conducted Monday at 2 p. m. at the Painter funeral home in Ridgeville in charge of Rev. Lawrence Baker, pastor of the Nazarene church. Burial will be in Riverside cemetery.

Surviving, other than the parents, are two sisters, Shirley and Carolyn Sue, a brother, Jimmy, all at home, and the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Stouder and Mr. and Mrs. Asa Wooters of Ridgeville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 24, 1941

Ensign Harley dies in east.

Word was received here Sunday of the death of Ensign George L. Harley, 24, who died as a result of an automobile accident at 9:30 p. m. Saturday near Portsmouth, Va.

Ensign Harley was a graduate of Fountain City high school, Miami university at Oxford, Ohio, and of the naval training school at Northwestern university in Evanston, Ill., after which he was stationed at Louisville, Ky., for four months. He had been assigned to duty on the USS Hornet, new aircraft carrier, since November 4.

Surviving are the mother, Mrs. Cleo Harley of Winchester; one brother, Max, student at Miami university; the grandparents, Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Harley of Hollansburg, Ohio, and Mrs. Emma Mote of Winchester, several aunts and uncles.

Time of arrival of the body from the east and funeral arrangements will be announced by the Thomas mortuary at Lynn.

(Funeral services were held on Thursday at the Hollansburg, Ohio Christian church in charge of Rev. Warren Souders. Interment was made in the Hollansburg cemetery.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, November 24, 1941

Turp Turner dies at Ft. Knox.

Turp Turner, 23, of Winchester, became Randolph county's first selective service trainee fatality Sunday when he died at Ft. Knox, Ky. Word of his death was received Sunday noon by relatives.

No details as to cause of death were available last night. The body will be shipped to the Fraze funeral home in Winchester with a military escort.

Turner left Winchester on March 19 with a group of 13 Randolph countians for Fort Benjamin Harrison for induction into the army. From there he was sent to Fort Riley, Kan., then to Camp Polk, La., and just recently to Fort Knox for advanced schooling.

Surviving are four sisters, Mrs. Betty Switzer, Mrs. I. R. Armstrong and Mrs. Noble Elder of Winchester and Mrs. William Norman of Zanesville, Ohio, and one brother, Millard of Winchester.

(Funeral services were conducted in Winchester on Wednesday at the East street Christian church in charge of Rev. Leo McKinley. Burial was made in the Williams cemetery at Zanesville, Ohio.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, November 25, 1941

Former fair board member heart victim.

Orpha Myers, 60, a former member of the Darke county fair board , died at 7:45 p. m. Sunday at his home in Gettysburg. Death was attributed to a heart ailment from which he had suffered for the past year.

Surviving are his wife, Bessie, and nine children, three sons and six daughters. They are: Ivor and William Myers, of Detroit, Michigan; Robert Myers, Mrs. Alice Clark and Mrs. Nina Warner, all of Gettysburg; Mrs, Ethel Weaver, of Ellerton, O.; Mrs. Louise Hunt, of West Milton; Mrs. Gladys Young, of Mason, O., and Miss Norma Myers, at home.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Wednesday at the Gettysburg Presbyterian church with Rev. Harrison L. Anthony and Rev. Carr officiating. Burial will be in the Gettysburg cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, November 25, 1941

County native heart victim.

Ill only a few minutes, Jonas D. Gettinger, 76, native and pioneer farmer in the Jackson township, Randolph county community, four miles north of Union City, died at 7 a. m. Monday following a heart attack at his residence.

Mr. Gettinger, it was reported, had arisen as usual and gone to the barn to work. A short time later he returned to the house, complaining that he didn't feel very well, and sat down by the stove to rest. After a few minutes he returned to his work, but again left it and went into the house where he sat on a couch near the stove. Mrs. Gettinger, working in the kitchen, stated that she heard a noise and went into the room where she found he had fallen from the couch, apparently dead.

The deceased was born in Jackson township on February 22, 1865, the son of John and Dorothy (Helm) Gettinger. He attended the Jackson, Ind. township schools and was a member of the Raper Chapel Methodist church. In 1897 he was united in marriage in the community of their residence with Ola Ornold.

Surviving besides the widow, Ola, are two children, Mrs. Mary Good of Greenville, and Floyd H. Gettinger, at home; one sister, Mrs. George Ripp, of Union City; two brothers, D. H. Gettinger, Union City route 3, and Willard Gettinger, of Anderson; two grandchildren, and two great grandchildren.

Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p. m. (CST) at the residence, with Rev. Earl Lantz officiating. Burial will be in the Lisbon cemetery.

The body will be removed from the Fraze funeral home in Union City at noon today, after which time friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 26, 1941

Influenza is fatal to Julius Lewis, retired Union City business man.

Julius F. Lewis, 73, prominent Union City business man and philanthropist, died Tuesday at 1 a. m. in the Union City hospital following a two weeks' illness from influenza. He had been in failing health for the past four years.

The deceased was born in Cincinnati, O., on July 15, 1866, the son of Archibald and Jennie (Simons) Lewis. He attended the Cincinnati schools and later was united in marriage with Lillie Webster.

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis moved to Union City 43 years ago, in 1898. He opened a clothing store on North Columbia street, where the Schmidt Norge Sales now is located. Later the establishment was moved to where the Seman market is, and still later the firm was enlarged, became known as the Lewis and Wolf Clothing store, and was moved to the larger quarters, where the present Kroger store is located.

Leaving the clothing business several years ago, Mr. Lewis and his brother, Jack, formed in partnership the Union City Glove company, which was located in rooms upstairs in the Atlas bank building, and later moved downstairs where how the Lyons and Wise barber shop is located. Mr. Lewis continued in this business until his health failed and forced his retirement in 1937.

At the time of his death, Mr. Lewis was president of the Lewis Cigar company, in Hamilton, O.; president of the Union City Realty corporation, and head of the Lewis Realty corporation. He was a member of the Union City Elks lodge, former Rotarian and a member of the Bene-Israel temple, in Hamilton, O. He was known throughout the community as a philanthrope who generously supported worthwhile civic enterprises and who quietly extended aid to many underprivileged individuals.

Surviving besides the widow, Lillian, are two children, William Jacob Lewis and Mrs. Ruth Simons, both of Hamilton, O.; one brother, Jack Lewis, of Chicago, Ill.; three sisters, Mollie Levy, of Middletown, O.; Bertha Cohen, of Chicago, and Katherine Schomer, of Middletown; and two grandchildren, Linda Myra Lewis, nine months, and Marjorie Simons, 10 months. Myra, a daughter, died at the age of eight years.

Services will be conducted at 11 o'clock this morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Morris, 530 North Columbia street, with Rabbi M. Silverman, of Hamilton officiating. Burial will be in the Hamilton, O. Jewish cemetery.

A lodge of sorrow was conducted by the Union City Elks Tuesday evening at the Morris home.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, November 26, 1941

Flory funeral to be Thursday.

Funeral services for Mrs. Naomi (Geil) Flory, 81, who died late Monday night at the home of a son, Joseph Flory, 511 Chestnut street, Union City, will be conducted Thursday at 10 a. m. in the Brooks funeral home, North Union street, Union City. Death followed an illness of two years' duration.

Rev. D. G. Berkebile, pastor of the Union City Church of the Brethren, will officiate. Burial will be in the Brethren cemetery.

The deceased was born near Lancaster, O., on January 28, 1860, the daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Strohle) Geil. She was united in marriage with Daniel K. Flory on September 21, 1879. Mrs. Flory was a member of the Old Order Brethren church. She had made her home in Union City for the past 40 years.

Surviving are three children, Clarence Flory, of Overpeck, O., and Clyde and Joseph Flory, both of Union City; three sisters, Mrs. Ralph McMillan, of Winterhaven, Fla.; Mrs. John Caron and Mrs. Beery, of Union City; two brothers, David Geil, of Nappanee, and Joe Geil, of Little Suamico, Wis.; six grandchildren, and five great grandchildren.

The body has been removed from the Brooks funeral home to the Flory residence, on Chestnut street, where friends may call until the hour of the services.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, November 27, 1941

Portland man burned fatally in fire which destroyed farm home.

Portland, Ind., Nov. 26, --- Earl O. Burg, 55, former Chicago artist and originator of the Virginia Apple Blossom Festival, died here today of burns suffered in a fire which destroyed his home, two miles west of Portland.

Three purebred dogs owned by his wife, who was away from the house at the time of the fire, were burned to death.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Thursday, November 27, 1941

Greenville man is tularemia victim.

Darke county's first tularemia, or "rabbit fever," fatality of the 1941 hunting season was recorded at 3 a. m. Wednesday when Frank Coombs, 52, of Greenville, died at Wayne hospital.

Coombs, who had been employed at Hill's Nursery in Richmond, Ind., is believed to have contacted the disease while on a hunting trip in the Richmond vicinity two weeks ago. However, a definite diagnosis was not made until after he had been admitted to the hospital in Greenville Monday.

Records of the Darke county health unit show that there have been two other deaths in the county directly attributed to tularemia in the past five years. A total of nine cases have been treated.

Coombs, a Greenville native, leaves two sons, Robert and Richard, both of Greenville; two daughters, Mrs. Max Cole, of Detroit, Michigan, and Mrs. William Lybarger, of Richmond; two grandchildren; his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. William Coombs of Greenville, and a sister, Miss Clara Coombs, also of Greenville. His wife, Edith, died in 1934.

The body has been removed to the Miller Funeral home, 234 West Fifth street where services will be held at 3 p. m. Friday. The Rev. Frank Thomas will officiate. Burial will be in Greenville cemetery.

Friends may call at the funeral home after 10 a. m. today.

(Miller Funeral Home Records state that George Franklin Coombs was born July 26, 1889, in Greenville, the son of William Coombs (b. Darke Co., OH) and Alice Bishop (b. Fletcher, IN.))

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 29, 1941

Former trustee of Franklin township is killed in accident.

A thick gray carpet of fog which spread over eastern Indiana and western Ohio Friday morning caused Randolph county's eleventh automobile accident fatality of 1941, when at 6:45 a. m. Albert E. Zimmerman, 67, former Franklin township trustee and Ridgeville marshal, was instantly killed when the car he was driving near the Wilson school crashed headon into a truck operated by Donald Elliott of Union City route 3.

Death was due to a broken neck. Zimmerman, an employe of the Harshman Tractor and implement company of Union City, lived southwest of Saratoga on the Roy Shierling farm, Winchester route 4, and was enroute to Union City when the crash occurred.

The Wilson school is two miles west of Union City on the old Winchester-Union City road.

The truck involved was owned and driven by Don Elliott, who operated his own truck for the Red 74 creamery of Union City. Neither Elliott nor James Young of Union City, who was a passenger in the truck, was seriously injured, although Elliott suffered from shock.

The Zimmerman machine, a total wreck, was taken to the Sterling Chevrolet garage in Union City.

Zimmerman was going east; Elliott west. The truck turned over on its side and came to a stop crosswise of the road, while Zimmerman's car, the front end caved in, was pushed into a bank in a ditch.

Investigating the accident were Sheriff Kora E. Davis, Deputy Lester Puterbaugh and Dr. Lowell W. Painter, county coroner.

The body of Mr. Zimmerman was taken to the Fraze funeral home in Union City.

Mr. Zimmerman was born at Emmettsville, west of Ridgeville, on May 22, 1874, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Zimmerman. He had resided all of his life in Randolph county. As a youth he attended the Green township schools. In 1925, in Sidney, O., he was united in marriage with Lola Richert-Hockensmith.

The accident victim was a former trustee of Franklin township, Randolph county, and marshal of Ridgeville. For 15 years he operated a hardware store in Ridgeville, and for the past year and one-half he had been employed as a clerk in the Harshman Tractor and Implement company, West Oak street, Union City.

Surviving besides the widow, Lola, are one son, Albert Zimmerman, Jr., at home; one foster daughter, Mrs. Opal Nenno, of Greensburg, Pa.; two step-daughters, Mrs. M. W. Conquest and Mrs. Joe Hottinger, both of Muncie; two step-sons, Duane Hockensmith, of Union City, and Donald Hockensmith, of Camp Shelby, Miss.; and two brothers, Martin Zimmerman, of Dayton, and Philip Zimmerman, of Powers Station, west of Ridgeville. Five brothers and one sister preceded him in death.

Funeral services will be conducted at the Saratoga United Brethren church, with Rev. D. R. Lusk officiating, at 2 p. m. Sunday. Burial will be in the Lisbon cemetery.

The body will be removed from the Fraze funeral home in Union City at 10 o'clock this morning to the residence on the Roy Shierling farm, southwest of Saratoga, where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 29, 1941

W. S. Murray, former Union City mayor, dies.

Marion, Ind., Nov. 28. --- Winfield S. Murray, 89 years old, former mayor of Union City, died Thursday at his home here. A native of Pendleton, he had been employed by the Railway Express agency 44 years.

He leaves a widow, two sons and two daughters.

Mr. Murray resided for a number of years in Union City, during which time he resided on West Division street and was employed as the American Railway Express agent.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, November 29, 1941

Goldie Adkins funeral today.

Funeral services will be conducted in the Union City United Brethren church at 2:30 o'clock (CST) this afternoon for Mrs. Goldie Adkins, 55, who died Wednesday night at the Reid Memorial hospital in Richmond following a 4 days illness caused by a ruptured appendix.

Mrs. Adkins, who resided with her daughter, Mrs. Margaret Drew, Boston pike, Richmond, was born in Union City, O., on December 11, 1885, the daughter of Aaron and Margaret (Maloy) Eley. She attended the Union City U. B. church. Although she left Union City about 18 years ago to make her residence in Richmond, she frequently visited friends and relatives in Union City for extended intervals.

Rev. R. B. Ditmyer, pastor of the Union City United Brethren church will officiate at the Union City services. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery.

Funeral services also will be held in the Doan & Son mortuary in Richmond at 1 o'clock this afternoon before the cortege starts to Union City with the body.

She leaves three daughters, Mrs. Drew, Mrs. Ellie Waldron, both of Richmond, and Mrs. Lauretta Fierstien, Portland; a son, Thermal Johnson, north of Richmond; 19 grandchildren; her mother, Mrs. Margaret Eley; seven brothers, Earl, Harry, Ervin, Bural, Orval, Pat and Lester Eley; two sisters, Mrs. Viola Redman, all of Union City, Ohio, and Mrs. Wavelene Burk, Portland, and several nieces and nephews.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 1, 1941

Mary Wilson, 78, native Scott, passes away.

A heart condition following several years of failing health claimed the life of Mrs. Mary D. Wilson, 78, Saturday at 4 p. m. at her residence, 339 East Main street, Union City.

She was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, on May 7, 1863, the daughter of George and Anna (Duncan) Calder. She attended the Aberdeen schools and at the age of 23 years came to the United States and the Union City community, where she spent the remainder of her life. She was united in marriage in Union City in 1887 with W. T. Wilson.

Mrs. Wilson was a member of the Union City Presbyterian church.

Surviving besides the husband, W. T. (Scotty) Wilson, are six children, Mrs. C. M. Murray, of Tulsa, Okla.; Miss Jessie Wilson, of Huntington, West Va.; Miss Mabel Wilson, of Akron, O.; Mrs. A. F. Marsh, of Great Neck, L. I.; Mrs. Harry Curts, of Indianapolis, and Charles Wilson, of Madison, N. J., and one sister, Mrs. William Christie, of Dumont, N. J. One son, Douglas died about one month ago. One daughter, Anna, also is deceased.

Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday at 10 a. m. in the Fraze funeral home, West Pearl street, Union City. Rev. Forbes Robertson, pastor of the Union City Presbyterian church, will officiate. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery.

Friends may call at the funeral home to view the remains from 2 p. m. until 5 p. m. and from 7 p. m. until 9 p. m.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 1, 1941

Revitzer rites held at Stelvideo church.

Funeral services for Mrs. Velma (Deeter) Revitzer, 26, who died Friday at Wayne hospital, Greenville, after an illness of several weeks duration, were conducted at 2:30 p. m. Sunday at the Stelvideo Christian church. Rev. W. L. Denlinger officiated. Burial was in the Stelvideo cemetery.

Besides the parents, she leaves her husband, Frank, of Detroit; a daughter, Myra Jean; eight brothers and sisters, and three grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Deeter, Greenville rural route 4, and Mrs. Elizabeth Leedom of Versailles route 4.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, December 2, 1941

Ex-Union City woman is dead.

Mrs. Edward Anderson, 84, former resident of Union City, died at the home of a son, Earl, 129 Washington street, Dayton, Ohio, at noon Monday. She had been in failing health for several years and seriously ill for two weeks.

Mrs. Anderson, a native of Greenville, for a number of years prior to her husband's death 8 months ago, lived in Union City; after her husband's death making her home in Dayton with her son.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 2 p. m. at the Brooks funeral home in Union City in charge of Rev. Ben Holroyd. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery. Friends may call at the mortuary after 1 p. m. Tuesday.

Mrs. Anderson was a member of the Union City Christian church.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, December 2, 1941

C. L. Thornburg, 80, passes away.

C. L. Thornburg, 80, native of Randolph county and a well known farmer, died at 4:25 p. m. Monday at his home five miles southwest of Farmland.

Surviving are six daughters, Mrs. Gail Wright of Santa Rosa, Cal., Mrs. Herman Parker of Union City, Mrs. Bernice Anderson of Modoc, Mrs. Dorothy Hutchens of Lynwood, Cal., Mrs. Marion Hubbard of Farmland and Miss May Thornburg at home; one sister, Mrs. Minnie Hammer of Farmland; three brothers, Elliott of Taft, Cal., Monie of Winchester and Rev. N. H. Thornburg of Farmland, 16 grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

The body will be returned from the Thornburg funeral home in Farmland to the residence Tuesday. Funeral arrangements will be announced after word is received from relatives in the west.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, December 2, 1941

Former Union City resident succumbs at Brethren home.

Two residents of the Brethren Church Home, Greenville, died within a few hours Sunday. They were: Mrs. Bell Harshbarger, 86, and Rufus (Allie) Marker, 68.

Mrs. Harshbarger, widow of the late Abraham Harshbarger of Pleasant Hill, died at 3:30 a. m. after a three week's illness resulting from a paralytic stroke. She had resided at the home since 1934.

Surviving are one son, Arthur, of Pleasant Hill, and a grandson.

Funeral services will be held at 9:30 today at the home with Rev. Oliver Royer, of Pleasant Hill, officiating. Burial will be in Pleasant Hill.

Mr. Marker, who had resided at the home since 1930, formerly lived near Union City. His death occurred at 2 p. m. Sunday. There are no immediate relatives.

Funeral services will be held at the home at 1 p. m. today with Rev. D. G. Berkabile officiating. Interment will be in State Line cemetery, north of Union City.

(Miller Funeral Home Records state that Bell Harshbarger was born Sept. 18, 1855 in Pleasant Hill, OH, the daughter of Samuel Debray (b. Maryland) and Amanda Blickenstaff (b. Pennsylvania.))

(Miller Funeral Home Records state that Rufus Allen Marker was born April 10, 1873 in Paulding Co., OH, the son of George Marker (b. Darke Co.) and _______ Noffsinger (b. Indiana.) He was single.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 3, 1941

Dies in Indianapolis

Carl Fetter, son of Mrs. Roy Boling of Union City, died suddenly Tuesday night in Riley hospital, Indianapolis.

The body is being returned to the Brooks & Sons funeral home in Union City where funeral arrangements will be completed today.

(Funeral services for Carl Fetter-Boling, 10 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Boling, 304 South Howard street, Union City, were conducted Friday at the funeral home. The youth was born at Waverly, Ohio where he attended school until in the fifth grade. Mr. and Mrs. Boling moved to Union City five weeks earlier after residing in Winchester for the past year. Surviving besides the parents are the maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Jones, of Waverly, and the paternal granparents, Mr. and Mrs. James Boling, of Summerville, O. No burial place was named.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 3, 1941

Well known auctioneer dies at Portland.

Portland, Ind., Dec. 2. --- Frank W. Greer, 58, well known auctioneer, died at 11:05 today at the Jay County hospital. He had been in failing health for several months and seriously ill since Saturday.

Surviving are the parents, the wife, and two sisters.

Funeral services will be held Friday at 2 p. m. at the Baird chapel in charge of Rev. J. H. Nall. Burial will be in the Green Park cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, December 5, 1941

David Densmore, 79, passes away.

David D. Densmore, 79, retired farmer, passed away at 11:15 a. m. Thursday at his home 2 1/2 miles south of Winchester, on what is known as the David Lasley farm.

Survivors are the son, Charles, with whom he resided; two grandchildren, Bertha Bushman of Chicago and Ernest Densmore of Liberty, and three great grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Clark and Maynard funeral home in Winchester for burial preparation and will be returned to the late residence where funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Saturday with Rev. Zelma Mills in charge. Interment in Fountain Park cemetery.

Friends may call at the residence anytime after Friday morning at 10 o'clock.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, December 5, 1941

Winchester's noted criminologist, James M. (Buck) Fletcher, dead at 85; funeral services Monday afternoon.

A keen and astute student of mystery, one of this generation's best known criminologists of the middle west - this was James M. (Buck) Fletcher, 85, who died Friday at 3:50 a. m. at his home, 235 South Main street, in Winchester.

Buck, called that by friends who loved him and by criminals who feared him, had been in failing health for the past several months and on several occasions in the immediate past had been reported as critically ill, with recovery doubtful. Yet he hung tenaciously onto life as he had onto the trail of criminals.

Funeral services for Mr. Fletcher will be conducted Monday at 2 p. m. at the residence in charge of Rev. G. M. Payne, pastor of the Presbyterian church, of which he was a member. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

The body will be returned to the home from the Clark and Maynard mortuary at 10 a. m. Saturday. Friends are invited to call.

Surviving are the widow, Anna; two daughters, Edna at home and Mrs. Esther D. Thornburg of Winchester, and a grandson, James T. Thornburg of South Bend.

Mr. Fletcher was a member of the James P. Goodrich Sunday school class of the Presbyterian church and of the K. of P. lodge.

Just a few months ago, he was a witness in the trial of Delmar Swick, an Ohio roustabout charged with the murder of Russell Bergman, Portland salesman, at Deerfield. He helped "crack" this case and after seven years, at the age of 84, his mind was just as clear as he testified before a jury in a packed court room.

For a half century he had been a relentless tracker of criminals. Beginning as a horse thief detective, he was widely sought in those turn of the century days when the theft of a high-stepping spanking mare was about the greatest blow a man could experience.

Later, he turned his hand to murder. For years there was not a mysterious murder in this section of the country but what Buck Fletcher was consulted. Perhaps best remembered by the younger generation were two in the winter of 1932, when Fletcher was instrumental in bearing a strychnine murder of 15 year old Mary Kritsch, Modoc high school pupil, and solving the slaying of Russell Bergman, Portland wholesale grocer who was shot to death in his automobile.

Fletcher, 76 years old at the time, came out of retirement at the request of Nathan Mendenhall, Randolph county prosecutor, and investigated the murders.

Fletcher served two terms as Randolph county sheriff, and was a former city marshal. His first term as sheriff began in 1890. He also served as probation officer in Winchester schools for several years. A promoter of the Eastern Indiana Telephone company, he served on its board of directors for 35 years.

Fletcher's chief strength as a detective lay in his pleasing personality. A rather small, quiet man, the opposite of the usual bluffing, blustering detective, Fletcher had the knack of obtaining confessions from the most brittle of accused criminals.

After careful and detailed investigations, which usually convinced Fletcher of a murder's identity, his warm, guileful questionings were usually productive of a confession.

One of his most celebrated cases, and an excellent key to his methods, was the Kritsch affair, which he solved in December of 1932. Miss Mary Kritsch, 15, a popular Modoc high school pupil, died on November 15 of that year, ostensibly from ivy poisoning. She had been under a doctor's care for several days because of the severe skin rash, but died unexpectedly and mysteriously.

Some three weeks later, her mother, Mrs. Mae Dawson, 36, confessed. The grand jury was called into hurried session, she pleaded guilty, and was given a life sentence in women's prison by Judge A. L. Bales.

It all happened within a few hours, but behind it all was the fine hand of Fletcher.

Fletcher traced the woman's movements, found that she had made two dime purchases of poison at a Winchester drug store. She told the druggist that the Strychnine was for poisoning rats. A motive was found. The daughter had been the cause of domestic trouble between Mrs. Dawson and her second husband. The detective found that Mrs. Dawson's first husband, Kritsch, father of the dead girl, had died mysteriously of mercury poisoning.

Confronted with fact after fact by the aged detective, Mrs. Dawson broke. "Well, if you'll call my preacher and have him come here, I'll tell you all about it," she said. Later, she admitted putting a capsule filled with strychnine in a bottle of her daughter's ivy poison medicine.

Brooding over the affair while in women's prison, Mrs. Dawson later accused her husband, Ray, of complicity in the murder. He stood trial and was acquitted by a jury in Jay circuit court at Portland, where the case had been sent on a change of venue.

The Bergman case, which happened a few days later, was Fletcher's last.

Russell Bergman, a Portland wholesale grocer, was found dead, shot through the head, in his car. The car was parked near a general store at Deerfield.

Only clue was a hat found at the scene of crime. Fletcher helped trace the hat to a Union City clothing store, where the clerk remembered its buyer, and Delmar Swick, a former convict, and Ed Haselmire of Union City, were indicted for the crime. Swick, the accused killer, fled. Haselmire served time as an accessory.

Fletcher traced Swick from one end of the country to the other, but the man was not caught until last summer. He was apprehended in the south, brought to Winchester, tried, found guilty, and is now serving a sentence.

Mr. Fletcher received a common school education and when a boy learned the cooper's trade under his father. For a time he worked for Henry Carter and Wysong Miller in Winchester, then engaged in the cooperage business for himself until he was 22 years old, when he was elected city marshal, which office he held for 12 years. In 1890 he was elected sheriff of Randolph county, being chosen a second time.

After expiration of his term of office four years later, he engaged with much success in private detective work. In 1904 he became probation officer and served in that capacity for many years. He was a Republican in politics, active in party affairs and frequently served as a member of the Republican central committee.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 8, 1941

Charles Northlane, business head, passes away.

A well know business man in Union City for the past 40 years, Charles L. Northlane, 72, died at 3 p. m. Sunday in the Methodist hospital, Indianapolis. Word of his death was received in Union City while annual memorial services were in progress at the Union City Elks lodge, of which he was a member. He made his residence at 516 North Howard street, Union City.

The deceased was born in Hagerstown on October 16, 1869, the son of Henry and Margaret (Clymer) Northlane. He moved to Union City from Crown Point where he had been employed as a telegraph operator for the Pennsylvania railroad. He was a brother of the late John C. Northlane, for many years agent in Union City for the Pennsylvania railroad.

Surviving besides the widow, Grace, are two children, Mrs. Frank Argast, of Indianapolis and Miss Ruth Northlane, of Dayton, O., and two grandchildren.

Mr. Northlane served for 15 years as a member of the Union City West Side board of education, his tenure terminating about six years ago. At the time of the erecting of the present school building, he was president of the board. At the time of his death he was president of the Pierce Elevators, with two branches in Union City and one in Harrisville. The deceased was a member of the National Grain Dealers association and was connected in a official capacity with the Indiana Life Insurance company. He also was a member of the board of trustees of the Union City Elks lodge when the present home was constructed and dedicated in 1938. He was a former member of the Union City Rotary club and the old Federal club, the latter now nonexistent.

Death resulted following a serious illness of five weeks and a period of declining health which extended over the past two years. Dropsy was considered as a contributing factor in his death.

The body was returned from the Indianapolis hospital to the Fraze funeral home in Union City, where funeral arrangements will be completed today.

(Funeral services were held on Wednesday the 10th at the residence, Rev. Forbes Robinson in charge. The Elks lodge also held a lodge of sorrow at the residence. Burial was made in the Union City cemetery.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 8, 1941

Bert Throp funeral Tuesday morning.

Herbert L. (Bert) Throp, 69, a well known Neave township farmer , died at 9:15 a. m. Saturday at Wayne hospital, Greenville, after an extended illness. He was admitted to the hospital seven weeks ago.

He leaves a widow, Vilda (Hill) Throp; two sons, Herman, of Groveport, O., and Walter, of Greenville, rural route, five daughters, Mrs. H. H. Perry, of Indianapolis, and Mrs. Bert Alley, Mrs. J. R. Hornaday, Mrs. Raymond Deeter and Miss Fay Throp, all of Dayton; four grandchildren; one brother, George, of Greenville rural route, and a sister, Mrs. W. T. McGregor, of Dayton.

The body has been removed to the Miller funeral home, Greenville.

Funeral services will be held there at 10 a. m. Tuesday with Rev. Noble Schlecty, of Rossburg, officiating. Burial will be in the Ft. Jefferson cemetery.

(Miller Funeral Home Records state that he was born Oct. 18, 1872 in Neave Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of Spafford Throp and Mariah Hecker, both also born in Neave Twp.)

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 8, 1941

County native killed in wreck near Muncie.

Muncie, Ind., Dec. 7. --- Conditions of four men, injured early Saturday morning in a head-on automobile collision one and one-half miles north of Muncie on state road 67, remained serious today at Ball hospital.

Lewis E. Myers, 29, of 1903 North Milton street, father of six small children, was instantly killed in the accident. He was a native of Randolph county.

A car occupied by seven colored youths, all members of the Portland CCC camp, being driven north on state road 67, collided with a machine going south and occupied by Myers and Herman Heath, 61, of the Cowan road. The Delaware county men had been at Albany and were returning to Muncie. State police said that the colored youths were returning to Portland after having attended a dance here.

Earl Lucas, 21, Nick Bigsby, 19, Roosevelt Carter, 16, Jesse Batson, 20, all colored, and Heath, were the most seriously injured. Little hope is entertained for Lucas, whose skull was fractured. John Cole, 20, Willie Williams and Edward Helms, other occupants of the Portland machine, were released after emergency treatment.

Lucas was widely known in colored boxing circles and boxed last year in the Golden Gloves tournament.

State police, the sheriff's department, city police and the coroner's office were still investigating the cause of the accident. Cole, who was driving the northbound car, is believed to have lost control of his machine when one of the men sitting next to him accidentally grabbed the steering wheel as they were passing another car, police said. All but the driver were asleep, Cole said. Cole said he did not see the other machine until too late to avoid the collision.

Coroner Gailon Stephens said that Myers' death was caused by a fractured skull. All of the critically injured suffered bone fractures and multiple abrasions. The cars were reduced to crumpled steel by the impact.

Myers was a baker by trade and had been employed y an Anderson bakery. He was also a former Muncie taxicab driver.

Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Oleta Myers; six children, Ervin, William, Elsie, Joyce, June and Alice Myers, all at home; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Kirby Myers; one brother, Charles Myers, of Portland, and a sister, Mrs. Charles Lewis, of Selma.

Funeral services will be conducted at the Union Chapel church, south of Parker, at 1:30 o'clock Monday afternoon, Rev. J. A. Reed in charge. The body was removed from the Thornburg mortuary in Farmland to the home of the parents, 1720 East Memorial drive.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 10, 1941

Lavine Hersch, 40, is dead at Portland; funeral Wednesday.

Portland, Ind., Dec. 9. --- F. Lavine Mersch, 40, owner of the Model clothing store, was found dead in his bed here early this morning. He was prominently known in clothing circles in eastern Indiana and western Ohio and a pioneer in the Phi Delta Kappa fraternity. Mr. Hersch was a brother of the late Jennie Rae Hersch, former president of the Indiana Business and Professional Women's club, who died several months ago. The mother is the only survivor.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday at 7:30 p. m. at the Baird chapel in charge of Rabbi Klausner of Cincinnati. The funeral cortege will leave Thursday at 9 a. m. for Cincinnati, where last rites and burial will be held at the Jewish cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, December 12, 1941

Brother of Union City man dies; long illness.

William M. Fourman, 63, died Wednesday at his home near Painter Creek after an extended illness.

Surviving are his wife, Viola; ten children and thirty-two grandchildren. The children, three sons and seven daughters are: James Fourman, Mrs. Viola Baker, Mrs. Echo Anderson, Mrs. Ellen Baker and Emerson Fourman, all of Arcanum; Mrs. Mary Brown, West Milton; Mrs. Myrtle Bollinger, and Mrs. Blanche Netzley, of Painter Creek; Mrs. Annabelle Bitner, of Johnsville, and Paul Fourman, of Laura.

There are also three brothers, George Fourman, of near Castine; John, of Union City, and Charles, of near Arcanum, and two sisters, Mrs. Jennie Redman, of near Arcanum, and Mrs. Lizzie Baldwin, of Grant, Mich.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Friday at the Abbottsville church with Rev. E. A. Arnett, of Pitsburg, O., officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, December 12, 1941

Retired farmer dies at home in Yorkshire.

R. H. Ford, 83, a retired farmer, died at 11:45 a. m. Wednesday at his home in Yorkshire after a lingering illness.

He leaves a widow and six children, R. M. Ford, Fostoria; Mrs. Frank Cottrell and Mrs. John Reser, of Piqua; Mrs. Marion Cole and Herschel Ford, Greenville, and Mrs. Roll Birt, of New Weston.

Another son, Dee Ford, died on August 24, 1941.

Funeral services are to be held at Shook's chapel at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon with Rev. Noble Schlechty officiating. Burial will be in the Holsapple cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Saturday, December 13, 1941

Hinshaw rites Sunday at Williamsburg.

Funeral services for Cora (Beard) Hinshaw, 69, who died Thursday night, will be conducted Sunday at 1:30 p. m. in the Williamsburg Friends church in charge of Rev. Emerson Cloyd of Brookville. Burial will be in Mount Zion cemetery north of Lynn.

Friends may call at the Thomas mortuary in Lynn anytime prior to the last rites.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 15, 1941

County native passes away.

William D. Burk, 86, pioneer resident of Randolph county, died Sunday at 1:15 p. m. at his residence, three miles south of Union City. In failing health for the past several years, the deceased had been seriously ill for seven weeks.

One of a family of nine children, Mr. Burk was born on November 9, 1855, in Ward township, the son of William and Mariah (Cole) Burk. He attended the Old No. 2 (Coddington) school, north of Harrisville. He pursued farming in Randolph county all of his life. Mr. Burk was united in marriage to Barbara Price on February 26, 1875, (65 years ago) in a ceremony performed at the old Price homestead on the Winchester-Union City pike.

Surviving are six children, Mrs. Forest Yoder, Mrs. Virgil Fertig and Mrs. Fred Snooks, all of Union City; Artie Burk, at home, and one brother, Enos Burk, residing four miles west of Union City. Three sons and four daughters preceded the father in death.

Funeral services will be conducted at the residence Tuesday at 2 p. m., with Rev. J. A. Watson officiating. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery.

The body will be removed from the Fraze funeral home in Union City Monday at 1 p. m. to the residence, where friends may call.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 15, 1941

Death claims Jean Hission.

A student of music and an accomplished accompanist and instructor of the piano, Miss Mary Jean Hission, 35, native and lifelong resident of Union City died suddenly Saturday at 3 a. m.

Death occurred at the C. C. Fisher residence, 526 North Howard street, where she and her mother; Mrs. Elsie Hission, were staying while their household good were being moved to their newly constructed home at 424 North Howard street. She had been ill about one week.

Miss Hission was born in Union City on April 5, 1906, the daughter of Michael W. and Elsie (Commons) Hission. She was graduated from the Union City West Side high school with the class of 1925 and was a member of the St. Mary's Catholic church.

She later was graduated from the Cincinnati College of Music and was a pupil of Albino Gorno, piano instructor. Miss Hission further pursued her education in music with the Dunning School of Music in New York City.

She was a pupil of Boumar Kramer, Indianapolis, and Buy Maler of Chicago.

The deceased was very active in the civic and social life of the community and was a member of the G. G. C. society, Delta Theta Tau sorority, Cecilian club, Rosary society, Blessed Virgin society, St. Mary's church choir and was an officer in the St. Mary's Study club and accompanist for the Cecilian choral group.

Her mother, Mrs. Elsie Hission, is the only immediate survivor. Michael Hission died 21 years ago. He was an officer in the old Union City Carriage plant. The grandfather of the deceased, Dr. William Commons, was a well known figure in Union City.

Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday at 9 a. m. in the St. Mary's church, with Rev. Aquinas Knoff officiating. Burial will be in the Holy Cross cemetery, south of Indianapolis.

Friends may call to view the remains at the new residence, 424 N. Howard street, until the hour of the funeral. The Morris funeral service, Union City, is in charge of the service.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 15, 1941

McCagg twins will be buried this morning.

Graveside funeral services for John and Paul McCagg, twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McCagg of Saratoga, who died Saturday in the Randolph County hospital, will be conducted Monday at 10:30 a. m. at the New Lisbon cemetery.

The twins were born at the McCagg home in Saratoga early Saturday morning, dying about noon at the hospital.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 15, 1941

Greenville youth is victim of meningitis.

A fifteen year old Greenville boy, James Carroll Goodrich, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Goodrich, died Friday evening at Wayne hospital, Greenville, after a three day illness from spinal meningitis.

Medical attendants report that the meningitis was of a non-contagious type developing from a severe head cold.

The boy was a member of the sophomore class at Greenville high school.

Besides the father and mother, he leaves four brothers, Charles, Robert, Richard and Jerry, and five sisters, Gwendolyn, of Cambridge, Minnesota, and Betty, Hazel, Shirley and Kathryn, all at home, and a grandfather, Ora Godown, of Troy.

The body has been removed to the Stocker funeral home where fiends may call. Funeral services will be held there at 2 p. m. Tuesday with Rev. A. V. Ritts, Arcanum, officiating. Burial will be in the Mote cemetery at Pitsburg, Ohio.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tueday, December 16, 1941

Susan Tillson, 82, passes away.

Mrs. Susan Jane Tillson, 82, died Monday at 6 a. m. at her home near Hollansburg, Ohio, after an illness of several weeks duration.

Surviving are three daughters, Nola, Ruth and Edna Tillson, all at home; one sister, Mrs. Florence E. Albright of Hollansburg; two brothers, Harvey Spencer of Hollansburg, and Charles Spencer of Osceola, Iowa; several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be conducted Thursday at 2 p. m. (EST) at the Hollansburg Christian church in charge of Rev. Jacob Frazier of Winchester. Burial will be in the Hollansburg cemetery.

The body was returned from the Thomas mortuary at Lynn Monday night to the home, where friends may call after noon Tuesday.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 17, 1941

Mrs. Luetta Zwiesler succumbs in Dayton.

Word has been received in Union City of the death Sunday of Mrs. Luetta (Lorton) Zwiesler, 75, widow of John Zwiesler, formerly of Union City. Death followed an extended illness and occurred at 7:14 p. m. in the St. Elizabeth hospital, Dayton, O.

Survivors include three nieces, Mrs. Folsom Nicholson, Mrs. Laura Mattix and Mrs. Clara James, all of Richmond, and two nephews, Oliver and Warren Phillips, also of Richmond.

Funeral services will be conducted at 11 a. m. today at the Frank Riesinger funeral home, 1334 West Third street, Dayton, and burial will be in the Lisbon cemetery, northwest of Union City.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 22, 1941

New Weston, O., farmer dies.

Earl William Mills, 45, a farmer and lifelong resident of Darke county, Ohio, died about 12:15 a. m. Saturday at his residence on New Weston R.F.D. 1. He had been in failing health for six months and seriously ill for the past two months.

Mr. Mills was born at Burkettsville, O., on September 29, 1896, the son of Josiah and Mary Alice (Hartrum) Mills. He was a member of the Lutheran church and attended the Mississinewa township No. 9 school. He was united in marriage with Lulu Elizabeth Breymier on December 9, 1922, in Ft. Recovery, O.

Surviving besides the wife, Lulu, are four children, all at home, Mary Elizabeth, Anna Belle, Earl Josiah and Bernice Ruth.

Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday at 2 p. m. (EST) in the Ft. Recovery Lutheran church, with Rev. D. R. Honn officiating. Burial will be in the Springhill cemetery at Ft. Recovery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 22, 1941

Rites for Richmond attorney to be today; was born at Arba.

Richmond, Ind., Dec. 21. --- Funeral services for Alonzo M. Gardner, 81, senior member of the law firm of Gardner, Jessup, Harrington and Haworth, who died suddenly Friday night, will be held Monday at 2:30 p. m. at the Doan & Son mortuary, Rev. Furnas Trueblood and Charles M. Woodman will officiate. Interment will be in Earlham cemetery.

The Wayne County Bar association will hold a memorial service Monday at 10:30 a. m. in the Wayne circuit court room in the courthouse. Members of bar associations in near-by counties have been invited to attend.

A son of Benjamin H. and Susannah (Morgan) Gardner, he was born Feb. 3, 1860, at Arba. Mr. Gardner was former city attorney and Wayne county representative to the state legislature in 1909.

He attended the grade schools of Franklin township, Wayne county, and the district school at Arba and for three years was a student at Spiceland academy.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, December 23, 1941

Frank L. Phillips, former resident of Winchester, is dead.

Muncie, Ind., Dec. 21. --- Frank L. Phillips, 69, who made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Thirza Crow, 504 South Franklin street, died last evening at Ball hospital where he had been a patient since suffering injuries December 5 when he was struck by an auto at Willard and Walnut streets. Mr. Phillips was en route to the Madison Street Methodist church about 7:30 o'clock in the evening when hit by the auto being driven by Ray Wells, 2014 1/2 West Tenth street.

A post mortem examination was made this morning to determine the cause of death. Mr. Phillips suffered a fractured foot and hip injury.

Phillips was engaged in the real estate sales business and was a member of the Madison street church where he sang in the choir. He was also active in the Loyal Workers' class.

The body was removed to the Piepho funeral home where friends may call. Funeral services will be conducted at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the mortuary, Rev. Mr. Harrison in charge. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery at Winchester.

Mr. Phillips had been a resident of this city for fifteen years, moving here from Winchester.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Tuesday, December 23, 1941

Amanda Louisa Boyd, 71, died in Portland at home of daughter.

Portland, Ind., Dec. 21. --- Amanda Louisa Boyd, 71, died at 5 a. m. today at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Laura Retell, 303 East Votaw street, where she had made her home. She had been in failing health for two years and seriously ill for two weeks.

Mrs. Boyd was born March 12, 1870 in Pike county, Ohio, the daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (Shownn) Kinnison. She first was married to John Clutter, who died 45 years ago, in 1900 marrying James M. Boyd, who died September 30, 1906. She lived in Missouri before coming to Indiana several years ago.

Surviving are two sons, John Clutter of Naylor, Mo., and James Clutter of Poplar Bluff, Mo., three daughters, Grace, wife of E. A. Landre of Poplar Bluff, May, wife of Herbert Jones of near Ridgeville and the daughter at whose home she died; one brother, William Kinnison, who lives at the Retell home in this city; nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Williamson and Son funeral home for burial preparation. Funeral arrangements will be made upon arrival of relatives from Missouri.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, December 26, 1941

Death claims Alice Flood, 62.

Mrs. Alice Flood, 62, died Thursday at 5:30 a. m. at her home six miles southwest of Ridgeville after an illness of several months.

Surviving are the husband, Benjamin, and one brother, Jacob E. Woodard of near New Pittsburg, and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be conducted Saturday at 1:30 p. m. at the Olive Branch church in charge of Revs. Harvey Thornburg, George Addington and Denver Medsker. Burial will be in the Hopewell cemetery.

The body will be returned Friday morning to the home from the Painter mortuary at Ridgeville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, December 26, 1941

Fisher rites are Friday at 11.

Funeral services for Dona Fisher, 64, who died Wednesday at 7:30 a. m. at her home in Deerfield, will be conducted Friday at 11 a. m. at the Middleton mortuary in Ridgeville.

The body will be taken to Gas City, where final rites will be conducted at 1 p. m. in the Gas City Friends church. Burial will be in the Gas City cemetery.

Surviving are the husband, James, and three sons, Walter and Martin Berry of Gas City and Lester Berry of National City, Colo.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Friday, December 26, 1941

Mrs. Marie Holland, 39, Darke Co. native dies.

Mary Marie Holland, 39, wife of Raymond L. Holland, was found dead in bed early Wednesday in her home seven miles west of Greenville. Death was attributed to a heart attack. Mrs. Holland, a Darke county native, was the daughter of Albert and Viola Goens. Her parents reside in Liberty township. Besides the husband and parents she leaves eight children, six sons and two daughters. They are: Eugene and Verlin of Muncie; Mrs. Betty Lear, of Richmond, and James, William, Cecil, Jack and Donna at home. There are also one brother, Kenneth Goens, of Greenville, and four sisters, Mrs. Dora Clemens, Mrs. Pauline Archery and Mrs. Augusta Hope, all of Muncie, and Mrs. Loma Faston, of Richmond. Funeral will be held at 2 p. m. Saturday at Long, O., with Rev. Edward Bass officiating. Burial will be in the Bass cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Monday, December 29, 1941

Darke County woman dies at daughter's home.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon at the Beamsville Christian church for Mrs. Sophia Smith, 76, who died Friday morning at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Edith Connaughton, at Toledo, O., where she had been spending the Christmas holidays. Death was attributed to a heart attack. She was the widow of the late Noah Smith of Beamsville.

Immediate survivors include three other daughters. They are: Mrs. Lou Treon and Mrs. Mae Moore, of Versailles, and Mrs. Blanche Folkerth, of Sidney, O.

Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 31, 1941

Harry T. Sipe, 74, passes away at sister's home.

Harry T. Sipe, 74, retired commercial traveler and former Portland attorney, died Tuesday at 9 a. m. at the home of a sister, Mrs. Ben Eakins at Ridgeville. He had been in failing health for two years and seriously ill since last summer.

Mr. Sipe, oldest member of the Jay County Bar association, was born in Randolph county on July 18, 1867, the son of John B. and Theresa (McGriff) Sipe. Spending his early life on a farm, attending the old Ridgeville college and Danville Normal, in the late 1880s he entered the Portland law office of his uncle, Emerson E. McGriff, who later became judge of Jay circuit court. Studying law in the summer and teaching school in the winter, Mr. Sipe was admitted to the bar in 1894.

Since retiring 12 years ago as traveling representative of the Adam Shaft Piano company, Mr. Sipe had lived at Ridgeville.

Funeral services will be conducted Thursday at 2 p. m. at the Middleton mortuary in Ridgeville, with burial in the Reitenour cemetery. The body will lie in state at the funeral home where friends are invited to call.

Surviving are three brothers, Richard of Seattle, Wash., Charles O., of Los Angeles, Cal., and Morton, of Cheyenne, Wyo., and two sisters, Mrs. William Smith and the sister at whose home he died, both of Ridgeville.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 31, 1941

Heart condition fatal to Mrs. I. L. Erbaugh.

Following a lingering illness of more than two years, the last one of which she was confined to her bed, Mrs. Della May Erbaugh, 61, widow of the late Rev. Ivan L. Erbaugh, died of a heart condition Tuesday at 1:15 p. m. at the home of a daughter, Mrs. John Keltner, 219 North Plum street, Union City. She had been seriously ill for the past two weeks.

The deceased was born near Phillipsburg, O., September 20, 1880, the daughter of Isaac and Isabell (Recker) Shank. She attended the Montgomery county schools and later the Bethany Biblical seminary. In 1903 she was united in marriage with Ivan L. Erbaugh near Brookville, O. Rev. and Mrs. Erbaugh came to the Union City community in 1925, where she had made her residence ever since with the exception of three years.

Rev. Erbaugh was a prominent and well liked pastor of the Union City Church of the Brethren from 1925 until 1935, at which time he left to accept a pastorate in Pleasant Hill, O. He died in February, 1936.

Mrs. Erbaugh was a member of the Union City Church of the Brethren and its attending associations and organizations.

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. John (Rachael) Keltner, at whose home death occurred; two sons, Paul E. Erbaugh, of Dayton, and Byron L. Erbaugh, of Montgomery, Ala.; four brothers, William, of Brookville, O.; Marion of Dayton, O.; Hubert, of Columbus, O., and Theodore Shank, of Trotwood, O., and two sisters, Mrs. Quinter Musselman, of Brookville, and Miss Ruth Shank, of Trotwood.

Funeral services will be conducted Friday at 12:30 p. m. (CST) in the Union City Church of the Brethren, with Rev. D. G. Berkebile officiating. Further services will be held at 3 p. m. (CST) in the Ebersole Church of the Brethren, near New Lebanon.

Friends wishing to view the remains are being asked to call at the Fraze Funeral home, West Pearl street, Union City, after Wednesday noon, until Friday noon, or at the church one-half hour preceding the service. The casket will be closed during the ceremony. Burial will be in the Ebersole cemetery.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 31, 1941

Death claims Jesse D. Cox, 63.

Jesse D. Cox, 63, died at the Randolph County hospital at 12:45 p. m. Tuesday after an illness of several weeks.

Surviving are the wife, Hattie; two sons, Everett R. and Willard A., both of Winchester; one daughter, Mrs. Mildred Heston at home; the mother, Mrs. Etta Cox, of Winchester; one brother, Charles Cox of Winchester, and five grandchildren.

The body was taken to the Summers funeral home for burial preparation. Funeral arrangements had not been completed last night.

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Union City Times-Gazette, Wednesday, December 31, 1941

Albert King, 76, justice of the peace, former sheriff, dies in Winchester.

Albert King, 76, White River township justice of the peace and former Randolph county sheriff, died at 3 a. m. Tuesday at his home in the Pretlow building on the west side of the square in Winchester. He had been in failing health for several months, but until about two weeks ago had been active in the duties of his office.

Surviving are the wife, Rebecca; two sons, Walter H. of Fort Wayne and Byron David of Long Beach, Cal.; one daughter, Mrs. Harry James of Long Beach; one brother, Harvey of Selma, and a sister, Mrs. Fred Dick.

Funeral services will be conducted Friday at 2 p. m. at the Winchester Methodist church in charge of Rev. N. H. Thornburg of Farmland, assisted by Rev. Herbert Boase of Winchester. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

The body will remain at the Thornburg funeral home in Farmland until noon Friday, when it will be taken to the church to lie in state for two hours before the services.

Mr. King was born August 27, 1865 at Maxville, the son of Bennett and Jane (Davis) King. Following his first marriage on August 30, 1890, he engaged in general farming in White River township and continued farming until 1897 when he became deputy sheriff of Randolph county under Thomas J. Overman, which post he held for four years.

Mr. King then for three years engaged in the restaurant business in Winchester. In the fall of 1906 he was elected sheriff, assuming office in January and serving four years. After his term of office expired, Mr. King returned to his farm in White River township where he continued until the fall of 1911, when he began in the coal business in Winchester.

Mr. King was a mason, a K. of P. and an Odd Fellow. Politically he was a Republican and was long active in the ranks of his party and frequently served as a member of the republican central committee.

At the time of his death, Mr. King was president of the Randolph county liquor board.

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