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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 1, 1938

Heart Attack - Mrs. Lillian Heck succumbs at Dayton hospital Thursday. - She was the mother of Fred Heck of the Japanese Gardens.

Word was received here last night from Dayton, O. of the death of Mrs. Lillian Heck, a well-known and respected resident who had resided in Union City most of her life.

She became ill some six weeks ago and two weeks ago her condition became serious and she was taken to the hospital in Dayton. Yesterday about noon she suffered a sudden heart attack and she passed away a little after 6 o'clock in the evening.

Mrs. Lillian Heck was born at Arba, Ind., Nov. 24, 1871, and she was the daughter of John and Margaret E. Thompson. They resided on West Hickory street while the daughter attended school. She was married to Clyde Heck in 1890. One son was born to this union, Fred Heck, who with Mrs. Heck operated the Japanese Garden Cafe on East Elm street. Mrs. Lillian Heck was an honored member of the American Legion Auxillary.

Besides the son, she is survived by one sister Mrs. Elizabeth Wagner, of Chestnut street and two brothers, I. Lew Thompson of Pontiac, Mich., and Ross R. Thompson of Mt. Carmel, Ill.

The body was taken to the Fraze Funeral home where friends may call up to the funeral hour. The funeral will take place from the Fraze home Saturday at 2 p. m. (C.S.T) conducted by Rev. Carl G. Adams, of the First Methodist church. Interment in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 1, 1938

Fatal Fall - Miss Mary McMahon plunges down cellar stairway at her home. - She was one of the best known trained nurses in this section.

The word of the accident and death of Miss Mary McMahon proved a great shock in Union City, for she was one of our best known trained nurses and was in the full bloom of her womanhood.

At 7:55 James McMahon, a brother, was working in a rear room when he thought he heard a noise. On investigating he discovered his sister at the bottom of the cellar stairway. He and the father carried her upstairs and Dr. R. A. Voisinet was called. He arrived only a very few minutes after the accident, but she was past medical aid, as she had sustained a fracture at the base of the brain.

Rev. Father Hammes was sent for and he had barely administered the last sacrament, when the patient passed away about ten minutes after 8 o'clock and some 15 minutes after the accident.

Just before the accident Miss McMahon had been cleaning the bathroom. Having occasion to go to the cellar, she raised the cellar door which is flush with the floor. Just how she fell will never be known for no one saw her fall.

Mary McMahon was the daughter of John and Bridget Flannigan McMahon and she was born in the house at 616 North Union street in which she lived all of her life, June 11, 1891. She attended St. Mary's school from which she graduated, after which she went to Indianapolis, where she took the trained nurses course in the Indianapolis City hospital, graduating from that institution with high honors in 1913.

Owing to the fine record she had made in her work, she was placed on the hospital staff, where she served as a trained nurse for 8 or 10 years, after which she returned to Union City, accepting a place in the Union City hospital, a place which she held until 10 years ago when she accepted a place in the hospital at Greenville, O., a position she has held ever since.

Miss McMahon was a life-long and devoted member of the Catholic church. She was a woman of sweet friendly disposition and she was loved and admired by all who know her, and she and her father and brother were a very happy family in the little home on Union street.

She is survived by the father, John McMahon, and one brother, James McMahon, a well known Big 4 locomotive fireman.

The Brooks funeral service was called and the body will be returned from the Brooks home to the residence, 616 North Union street.

The funeral services will take place Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church conducted by Rev. Father T. J. Hammes. Burial in the St. Mary's cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 1, 1938

Died --- Rollie Archie Louk, Wednesday March 30, 1938; aged 1 month and 6 days. The body was taken from the Fraze Funeral Home to the home of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Louk, 416 E. Main street, Thursday morning. Funeral services will be held at the home Friday at 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. Lewis Ludwick. Interment in the City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 4, 1938

Passes Away - Mrs. Ella Hueber succumbs to illness at home in Dayton. - She and her husband formerly resided in Union City.

Word has been received here by the relatives of the death of Mrs. Ella Hueber who passed away at her home in Dayton, O., an hour before noon after several weeks illness.

Mrs. Hueber was formerly Miss Ella Dillon and she was born in Dayton, O., where she grew up and attended school.

She was married to Henry Hueber and after their marriage they resided in Union City for several years while Mr. Hueber was a well known shoe salesman. She was a devout Christian woman and a member of the Sacred Heart church.

She is survived by the husband, two brother-in-laws, George and Tom Hueber and one sister-in-law, Mrs. G. A. Rosenbush, North Walnut street.

One niece Mrs. Kockersperger, two grandnieces, Mrs. Edward Oesbeck and Fern Weigert, one great grandniece Coral Oesbeck.

The funeral will take place from the home of the niece, 161 Virginia Ave., Tuesday at 8:15 a. m. and at Sacred Heart church at 9 a. m. Burial in the Calvary cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, April 5, 1938

Mrs. E. C. Leggett dies at Winchester

Winchester, Ind. --- Mrs. Eva C. Legget, 75, widow of George E. Leggett, former mayor of Winchester, died at 10:40 o'clock last night at the Randolph County Hospital. She was the county school attendance officer.

Surviving are the daughter, Mrs. Mariah Clark of Indianapolis; one son J. C. Leggett of Port Arthur, Texas, and several nieces and nephews.

The body was removed to the Clark, Maynard and Potter funeral home, where it will remain until the service.

[Funeral services were conducted at the funeral home at 10:30 o'clock Thursday morning in charge of Rev. Fred Thornburg. The place of burial was not announced. The deceased was a graduate of Nurses' Training School at Washington, D. C., and also of the Indiana University Medical School, Indianapolis. At the time of her death she was attendance officer of Randolph County which position she had filled for seventeen years.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, April 6, 1938

Former county official dies at Parker, Ind.

Winchester, Ind. --- Melville E. Mull, 74, former Randolph County treasurer died at his home in Parker early this morning. He is survived by the widow, Nora; one son, E. Clark Mull, of Greenfield; one daughter, Mrs. Arvic Beckley, of Muncie; and four grandchildren.

The body will remain at the Clark Maynard and Potter funeral home here, where friends may call until the funeral which will be held in the Methodist Church, Parker, at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon. The Rev. Mr. Nyswander will have charge and burial will be in Maxville Cemetery. The deceased served as treasurer of the county for two terms from January 1, 1919 to January 1, 1922.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 8, 1938

Lived Here - Cal Norris, well known horseman died at home near Nashville. - He was brought from Lima, O., a very sick man.

As announced in yesterday's Daily Times, Cal Norris was brought from Lima, O., by Irwin Slick and taken to the latter's home near Nashville, where he died last night.

Calvin Norris was born near New Pittsburg, Ind., in Jay Co., 76 years ago, and he lived all of his life in this locality, the different places where he lived including New Lisbon, the Martin Costello farm, and he lived with Harl Enbody for eighteen months. His wife passed away in 1932 and one son Edward also died some years ago at his home near Nashville, O.

Norris became a well known horseman, and dealt extensively in horses. He also hauled logs for a time in his life, and spent much of his time in Union City. Mr. and Mrs. Cal Norris for three or four years lived on the Wm. Potter farm near Horseshoe Bend, west of the city.

He had a brother, Bert Norris, who went to the world war and died while on duty.

Bert Norris assigned his pension and insurance money to a niece, a daughter of Key Botts, who made her home with her uncle Cal Norris.

Mr. Norris had been residing in Lima, the past few years but while in health he always liked to come back to Union City and mingle with his friends here. The funeral announcements will be made later.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 11, 1938

Lose Mother - Mrs. Mary Connelly is called home at 6:10 this morning. - She had lived all but six years of her life in Union City. - She was the mother of G. E. Connelly and the Misses Esther and Helen Connelly.

Death called at the home of Miss Esther and Helen Connelly, 437 West Pearl street, this morning and took from them their mother who passed away at ten minutes after six o'clock. She became ill two weeks ago, and while everything was done for her including the services of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. G. E. Connelly, who is a graduate nurse, the patient became gradually weaker and while she never lost consciousness, she closed her eyes in her last long sleep at the time stated above. At her bedside were her son, two daughters and daughter-in-law.

Mrs. Mary M. Connelly, was the daughter of Patrick and Catharine Wiese Kennedy, and she was born May 26, 1865, in a home which stood on the ground occupied by the present home. The home she was born in was burned in the big fire of 1883. She lived all of her life excepting six years in this city. She attended St. Marys school and she was married to Andrew J. Connelly, Jan. 11, 1886.

For six years following their marriage the couple lived in Indianapolis, where the husband held the position of trainmaster on the P. and E. division of the Big Four railroad, after which they moved back to Union City and the husband passed away 40 years ago.

After the death of the father and head of the family, the mother bravely took on herself the task of bringing up her family which consisted of herself and three small children. That she succeeded is evident by the fine family she brought up.

She was a faithful Christian woman, a noble mother and a life-long member of the St. Marys church. During her years of health she was active in her church work and was always ready to do her full share in service for her church.

The survivors include one son, G. Ernest Connelly, trainmaster of the Cleveland Division of the New York Central line with headquarters at Bellefontaine, O.; Miss Esther Connelly and Miss Helen Connelly, at home. Also four grandchildren Robert, Joseph, Mary Marcella, and Barbara Ann Connelly of Bellefontaine, O.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home from where it will be returned to the family home Tuesday morning and where friends may call.

The funeral will take place Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Marys church. Interment in St. Marys cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 11, 1938

Pioneer - Alexander Bowman passes out at the age of 89 years. - He was born in Darke County, Ohio, when that was a wilderness.

Alexander Bowman, a well known pioneer resident of this county, died at 5:30 Friday, April 8, at his home near the Wayne school, after an extended illness of a number of years.

Mr. Bowman was born in Darke County, Ohio, April 30, 1848 and so he lacked only a few days of reaching his 90th year. He attended the school at New Madison, O., and when he was a lad of 16 years of age he moved over into Randolph County. He was the son of Henry and Matilda Dixon Bowman. The survivors are two sons, Chas. W. Bowman, of Winchester, and Herbert L. Bowman, of Union City. Also one sister, Isabel Bowman.

The senior Bowman was a member of the South Salem Christian church, and all of his life he followed the vocation of farmer.

The Fraze funeral service was called in and the funeral took place today, Monday, April 11, at 2 p. m. from the residence conducted by Rev. Elvin Thornburg, and the music was supplied by Rev. and Mrs. Earl Lantz. Burial took place in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, April 12, 1938

Pioneer Lady - Mrs. Annie E. Cook passes away last night at midnight. - She had lived most of her live in this locality.

Mrs. Annie E. Cook, relict of Daniel Cook, passed away last night at midnight at her home 525 North Columbia street. She had been ill for the past year, but seemed to be improving, when last Friday she suddenly became worse again. She never rallied, but grew steadily weaker, and the end came as stated.

Mrs. Annie E. Cook was the daughter of George and Annie First Lambert, and she was born at Mechanicsburg, Ohio, Nov. 3, 1856, she was therefore 81 years of age at the time of her death.

When she was quite small her parents moved to the old Lambert farm a short distance south of Hillgrove, O. Here she grew up and she attended the Hillgrove school.

She was married in October 1872 to David Cook, the ceremony taking place at the home of the Rev. Thomas Wenrick, Rev. Wenrick officiating. The young couple took up their home on the Wenrick pike, the year the road was opened, on a farm which is now known as the Joe Furby farm. Here the couple resided for many years and one son was born to them, Charles R. Cook and Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Cook are now well known residents of Union City. Mrs. Annie E. Cook also raised two girls Esta Former, the present Mrs. Fern Sharp, of Columbus, O., and Pearl Fry who now resides at Pleasant Hill, Ohio.

Mrs. Cook was a splendid Christian woman, and a very devout and active member of the Church of the Brethren, and the Ladies Aid Society in both of which she was a faithful and diligent worker for years.

The husband Daniel Cook passed away in 1912, and two years later she moved to Union City, and took up her home at 525 North Columbia street where she resided the rest of her life. During her illness she was tenderly cared for by her son and his wife, who saw to it that all her wants were supplied. She was a woman of very pleasant personality, and she therefore made many friends who will regret to learn of her passing, and who will long remember her.

Besides the son and wife, and the two foster children alluded to above, she is survived by three brothers Cal and Sam Lambert of St. Petersburg, Florida and John Lambert of Anderson, Ind.. Also one sister Mrs. Emma Glunt, of Anderson, Ind.

The Fraze Funeral Service was called and the funeral will take place from the Church of the Brethren Thursday at 1:30 p. m (C.S.T.) conducted by Rev. D. E. Berkabile and Rev. Carl G. Adams. The grave-side services will take place at the mausoleum in Greenville, O. The body will remain at the home 525 North Columbia street where friends may call.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, April 13, 1938

Called Home - Mrs. Albert Wion passed away at home of daughter near Troy. - She was the grandmother of Mrs. Daisy Wion Bruss of this city.

Mrs. Albert Wion, aged 73, passed away Tuesday at 15 minutes past 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the home of her daughter Mrs. De Razor, two miles east of Troy, O. She was the grandmother of Mrs. Daisy Wion Bruss, wife of the owner of the Bruss garage, corner of Chestnut and Howard streets. Mrs. Bruss on receiving word of the serious illness of her grandmother left immediately to drive to the Razor home where she arrived in time to see her grandmother alive and help care for her during her last hours.

The survivors include the following eight children: Mrs. Ormah Razor, Troy, O., Mrs. Nora Rohr, Piqua, O., Mrs. Bessie Wetzel and Mrs. Daisy Fenstermaker, of Arcanum, O., Mrs. Matilda Wetzel, Covington, O., Mr. A. W. Wien, Gettysburg, O., John Wien, of Bradford, O., Mrs. Rosa Beulah at home.

Also 43 grandchildren and twenty-four great grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends.

The remains will lie in state at the Ralph Miller Funeral Home in Greenville, O. until 12 o'clock (E.S.T.) Thursday. Friends and neighbors may call up to the time of the hour named. A private funeral service will be held at 2:30 p. m. (E.S.T.) Thursday at the Funeral Home. Burial will take place in the Gettysburg Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, April 14, 1938

Died - Word was received today of the death of James Kirshner, 57, at his home in Baltimore, Md. He was the brother of the late N. P. Kirshner of this city and a resident of Ansonia, O. The remains will arrive in this city Friday morning and taken to the Brooks Funeral Home. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock at Ansonia, O.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, April 19, 1938

Dies Suddenly - C. Grant Stocksdale succumbs to a heart attack this morning. - He was the brother of Larkin and Paul Stocksdale of the A & P store.

A mantle of sorrow has descended over the Stocksdale home and community over the sudden death of Grant Stocksdale, which occurred this morning, some time between six and seven o'clock at his home, two miles north of the city on the State Line.

At six o'clock he went out with the hired hand to do the feeding, and that was the last he was seen alive. When he failed to come in for breakfast Mars. Stocksdale started out to call him. She failed to see him and finally arrived at the home of her father, Wm. Weaver, not far away. Mr. Weaver joined in the search, and finally came across Stocksdale's body. He had been pitching hay down from the hayloft when he succumbed to what must have been a very sudden attack. About the same time Don Stallingworth, of the Union City Telephone Co., arrived on the scene, and lent assistance. Grant Stocksdale was employed by the telephone company as a cable splicer, and Stallingworth came to summon him to work.

Dr. L. K. Phipps was called and in turn called the Coroner, Dr. Lowell Painter, who gave the verdict that Stocksdale had died from a heart attack at 6:30 a. m. His sudden death was a great shock, for he was well liked y all who knew him and only a short time ago he passed a perfect physical examination. He was in the city yesterday and he appeared in the best of spirits and health.

C. Grant Stocksdale was the son of Charles R. and Grace Noffsinger Stocksdale, and he was born on the old Lark Stocksdale farm, 8 miles south of the city, Oct. 30, 1907. His mother passed away four years ago.

Grant Stocksdale attended the Bennett school and Jackson, O. school, and graduated from the Jackson school. He became an expert cable splicer, and for the past two or three years had been an employee of the Interstate Telephone corporation.

He was married to Lois Mae Weaver, and they moved to the home on North State Line.

Grant Stocksdale was a fine example of young American manhood. He was a real Christian and a member of the Church of the Brethren, in which congregation he at one time served as Sunday School superintendent. He was of a pleasant personality and had many friends, who will be shocked and grieved over his untimely death.

The survivors include the father, Charles R. Stocksdale, and the following brothers and sisters: Emerson Stocksdale, Newark, O.; Ezra Stocksdale, Portland, Ind.; Larken and Paul Stocksdale, of this city; Betty Jean Stocksdale at home. Also the maternal grandmother, Mrs. Amanda Noffsinger, of Phillipsburg, O.

The Brooks funeral service was called and the funeral arrangements will be announced later.

(The funeral took place from the Church of the Brethren Thursday at 1:30 p. m. (C.S.T.) conducted by Rev. D. G. Berkabile. Burial was in the Church of the Brethren cemetery, North State Line.)

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, April 26, 1938

Arrange services for daughter of newspaper founder.

Greenville, Ohio --- Funeral rites for Mrs. Anna Browne Kuntz, 71 years old, wife of Nicholas Kuntz, retired lumber dealer, who died suddenly Saturday at 6 p. m. of apoplexy was held Tuesday.

Services began at 10 a. m. in the Emmanuel Catholic church. Burial at Calvary cemetery, Dayton. She was the daughter of the late W. A. Browne, Sr., founder of the Greenville Daily Advocate.

She is survived by the husband; four daughters, Thomasine, at home, Mrs. Mary Fiel and Mrs. Ann Selby, of Dayton, and Mrs. Hester Wall, of Richwood; three brothers, William A. Browne, Walter Browne, publisher of the Greenville Advocate, and Linn Browne, Darke county sheriff, and one sister, Mrs. Agnes Wolf, all of Greenville, and her mother Mrs. Sarah Browne.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 29, 1938

Died --- Ben Brubaker at 10:05 E. S. T. at the home of his son Clyde Brubaker, age 86 years, 1 month and 6 days. Funeral services will be held at the son's home Sunday at 2 o'clock (C. S. T.), burial in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. - Merrill Painter, Mortician.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 2, 1938

Brought Back - The remains of Charles Gordon will be buried in his boyhood home. - He had not been a well man for years and died early this morning.

Charles Gordon, a former well-known resident of Union City, Ind., passed away early this Monday morning, May 2, at his home 601 West 137th street, New York City. He had been more or less of an invalid for several years.

J. Charles Gordon was born in Union City, Ind., Aug. 10, 1875, and he was the son of Oliver and Margaret Gordon. He attended the West Side grade school and high school.

After completing his school studies he became an expert bond salesman in which capacity he operated in Chicago, Scranton, Pa., Columbus, O., Cincinnati, O., and Indianapolis, Ind. For thirty years he was active in the Wall Street district in New York City. In the early years of the 20th century he came back to Union City and was employed in the old Atlas Bank.

He was married June 28 to Miss Hilda Dorge, of New York City, who survives her husband.

J. Charles Gordon was a member of the Methodist church. He was also a member of the Country Club, and the old Stag Club.

He was possessed of a very pleasant personality and was always cheerful and genial. Many old friends here will regret to learn of his passing.

The survivors include besides the widow, one sister, Mrs. Stanley Glunt, 724 West Oak street, and one brother, Fred Gordon, of Portland, Ore.

The funeral will take place Wednesday, May 4, from the home in New York. The remains will be cremated and later will be brought to Union City for burial in his boyhood home.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, May 3, 1938

Native - Of this community all her life was Mrs. Alice Woodbury. - Funeral will take place from M. E. Church Wednesday.

Mrs. Susannah Alice Woodbury, widow of the late Daniel Woodbury, has passed away. She was born December 5, 1850, just south of this city.

Mrs. Woodbury was a resident of this city until about a year ago when she went to Indianapolis to make her home with her daughter. She was a member of the Methodist church and took an active part in the work until her health began to fail a few years ago. She has been ill since last October and since last Tuesday has been in the Methodist Hospital at Indianapolis. She passed to rest Monday morning about two o'clock.

Mrs. Woodbury was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Clear and her maiden name was Susannah Alton Clear. She was born on South State Line road on a farm which is now the Tom Tobin place.

She attended the Haysville school and when she arrived at marriageable age she was married to Daniel Woodbury who died many years ago.

She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. C. W. Heuss, of Indianapolis and Mrs. Charles Nichols of Bellefontaine, O. Also one sister Mrs. Malinda Harshman of Spartanburg.

The funeral will take place Wednesday, May 4, at 2 p. m. from the Methodist church conducted by Rev. Adams. Interment in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 9, 1938

Veteran - Of the Civil War, Enos Fulghum is dead. - Last surviving member of the Winchester G. A. R. Post.

Winchester, Ind. - Enos P. (Pum) Fulghum, 90, Civil War veteran, died at his apartment on North Main street Sunday morning following a two weeks' illness.

Mr. Fulghum enlisted with Company K, 124th Indiana Infantry on November 27, 1863, at the age of 16 and was mustered out of service on August 31, 1865, after having seen action in numerous historic battles, including those of Nashville, Franklin, the three months' siege of Atlanta and Wise's Crossroads in North Carolina. He was the last surviving member of the Nelson Tyusler Post No. 60 G. A. R. Following his return from service with the Union Army Mr. Fulghum was connected with a Kansas stock company and later took charge of a stock farm in Randolph County. He had served as a rural mail carrier, a fireman, a police officer and as courthouse custodian. He retired about 16 years ago.

Surviving are two daughter, Mrs. Bertha Puckett and Miss Ruth Fulghum, both of this city.

The body was removed to the Fraze funeral home where it will remain until 10 o'clock Tuesday morning. It will then be removed to the Main Street Church of Christ to lie in state until 10:30 o'clock when funeral services will be held, in charge of the Rev. Lee Jackson. Burial will be in Fountain Park Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, May 10, 1938

Born Here - James McMahon passes away suddenly in his Chicago home. - He was the brother of John McMahon of 616 North Union Street.

A letter to the Union City Times from Frank McMahon, of Chicago, brings word of the death of his father. The letter says in part, "James McMahon, a former resident of your city passed away suddenly on May 2.

He resided with his family at 1607 East 69th street, Chicago, Ill, at the time of his death. For many years he was a subscriber to your paper and he was a brother to Mrs. Elizabeth Murphy."

James McMahon was the son of James and Margaret McMahon and he was born at Ft. Recovery. His parents for a time resided one and one-forth miles west of this city, eighty-five years ago. He attended school at Pikeville, O., and later also attended the Dayton Commercial school.

When quite a young man he took up telegraphy and he was connected with the Western Union Telegraph Co. For some years he was connected with the Western Union office here.

He is survived by the widow, one son Frank McMahon and one daughter Mrs. Anna Rennard. Also one brother, John McMahon, who is the only surviving member of his family, and his son James McMahon, resides at 616 North Union street.

The funeral and burial took place in Chicago.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, May 10, 1938

Former Mayor - Schmermund of Greenville, Ohio is dead. - Was one of Greenville, O. most prominent citizens.

Greenville, O. - Frank Schmermund, 75 years old, local businessman and former Greenville mayor, died Sunday evening of a heart attack in his home on West Water street. He suffered the attack shortly after returning from a walk through the business section of the city, and collapsed in the living room of his residence. He died before medical aid could be summoned.

Mr. Schmermund founded the local jewelry firm bearing his name in 1883, and was identified with Greenville, financial, and civic enterprises. At the time of his death, he was serving as president of the Greenville Building company.

Socially, he was a member of the Anthony Wayne Sportsman's league, the Rotary club, the Blue Eastern Star, and Scottish Rite lodges of the Masons, the Elks' club and the Greenville Lions' Club.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in St. Paul's Episcopal church with Rev. E. E. Estabrook in charge. Interment will be made at the Greenville Cemetery.

Survivors are the widow Emma; one son, George, of this city; four grandchildren, George II and Charles of Greenville, and Emma and Frank Pettyjohn of Milford, Del.; one brother, Karl of Columbus, and two sisters, Mrs. Deborah Hankinson of Greenville and Miss Marie Schmermund of Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, May 12, 1938

Succumbed - Mrs. Etna F. Hiatt passes away following a sudden attack. - She was the relict of Charles Hiatt and resided west of the city.

Mrs. Etna F. Hiatt, a notice of whose sudden illness appeared in the Times, succumbed to the attack, at her home on the Wayne and White River Township line, five miles west of Union City, at 10:55 a. m. Wednesday, May 11.

Mrs. Hiatt was born in Franklin Township, Randolph County, Indiana, Sept. 1, 1857, and she attended school in that district. She was the daughter of Jesse and Lydia Stanley Hiatt.

She was married to Charles Hiatt, who died 4 years ago, and one son, Merl Hiatt, employed at the Imperial Electric Co., survives.

Mrs. Hiatt is also survived by eight brothers and sisters, four grandchildren and six great grandchildren. She resided all her life in this county, and she was a good Christian woman and also a member of the Rebekah Lodge.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home from where it will be returned to the residence Friday at 4 p. m.

The funeral announcements appear elsewhere in this paper.

The family resided for a few years at Converse, Ind., where they operated a laundry.

(The funeral services were held at the Hiatt home Sunday at 10 a. m., conducted by Rev. Charles E. Hiatt. Interment in Converse, Ind. I. O. O. F. Cemetery)

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 13, 1938

Auto Crash - Causes the death of Mrs. Eugene Jarrett and baby son. - Accident took place at Five Points on Route 27.

Winchester, Ind. - Mrs. Marciella Jarrett, 21 years old, wife of Eugene Jarrett, northwest of Winchester, was killed instantly yesterday afternoon in a motor crash at Five Points, three miles north of here, and her youngest son, Marcelle, 16 months old, was injured fatally. He died at Randolph County hospital about 8 o'clock last night. The oldest son, Ronald Eugene, four years, also was injured and taken to the hospital but he is expected to recover.

Charles Spangler, Fort Wayne driver of the car that collided with the one operated by Mrs. Jarrett, was taken to the hospital suffering with minor injuries and was dismissed last evening.

The accident occurred at the intersection of U.S. 27 and the Saratoga road. Spangler was headed south on U.S. 27 and Mrs. Jarrett was traveling west. Vision to the north was obstructed at this point, it is presumed by those near the scene of the accident, and Mrs. Jarrett apparently failed to see the oncoming southbound car when driving onto U.S. 27.

From the tracks on the road and through statements of people at the scene of the accident, it was indicated that the drivers of each car tried to swerve their machine in order to miss the other with the result both machines were carried quite a distance south of the point of impact.

Surviving Mrs. Jarrett are the husband, the oldest son, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar May, of Ridgeville, and several brothers and sisters.

The body was brought to the Fraze Funeral home in Winchester to await completion of funeral arrangements. Coroner Lowell Painter investigated the accident with other Randolph County officials. The accident marked the 14th fatality at this dangerous intersection in the past 12 years.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 16, 1938

Life's Work - Of Charles R. Swisher passes away at Dayton, O. - Will be buried in this city Wednesday afternoon.

It has been announced that Charles R. Swisher, 78, died at his residence, 735 Ferguson avenue at 1 p. m. Sunday at Dayton, Ohio.

He was associated for 32 years with the M. S. Benn Real Estate company in Dayton, O., and was well-known here in Union City where he spent his boyhood days.

Surviving are his wife, Mary; five sons, Gilliam E.; James R., Ralph and Glenn, of Dayton and August, of Los Angeles; two daughters, Mrs. Owen Mumma and Mrs. Orville Snyder, Dayton; four brothers, Frank, Cleveland, Trace, of Troy, O.; Calvin, Union City, Ind., and Elmer, Anderson, Ind., a sister, Mrs. L. C. Lambert, St. Petersburg, Fla.; 17 grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at 12:30 p. m. Wednesday at the Alapach mortuary in Dayton, and at 1 p. m. at the United Brethren church in Union City, Rev. C. W. Brewbaker of Fairview U. B. church officiating. Burial will be in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 16, 1938

End Comes - Mrs. Anna Harless passes away after short illness. - Had lived practically all her life in this city.

The funeral services for Mrs. Anna Harless, 77, took place this morning at 10 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Ben Holroyd, at the Brooks Funeral Home.

Mrs. Harless was the widow of the late Patrick Harless and had lived practically all her life in this city at 414 North Howard street, where she died. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Badalow and received her schooling in the Ft. Recovery, O. schools. She was a true Christian woman and a member of the Christian church. She leaves one daughter Donna. Interment took place in the City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 16, 1938

Mrs. Jennie Price dies at Saratoga.

Saratoga, Ind. - Mrs. Jennie Price, 80, died Sunday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bertha Bell, following a year's illness. Mrs. Price was a member of the Saratoga U. B. Church. Besides the daughter she is survived by four sons, William, of Muncie; Harry of Logansport; Wilbur, of Union City, and Joseph of Hemp, N. C., two sisters, Mrs. Oliver Brawley, of New Paris, O., and Miss Flora McKee, of Gettysburg, O.; one brother Elmer McKee, of near Eaton, O.; five grandchildren and one great grandchild.

The body was removed to the Fraze funeral home at Union City and will be returned to the Bell home this afternoon. Services will be conducted at the Saratoga U. B. Church at 1:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, the Rev. Ira Clark of Piqua, O. assisted by the Rev. D. R. Lusk of Saratoga officiating. Burial will be in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 16, 1938

Receives word of her sister's death.

Mrs. Paul D. Cretchler, 323 East Elm street, in this city, has received word of the death of her sister, Mrs. Lulu Callahan, in a hospital at San Francisco, Calif., which took place on Wednesday, May 6th.

Mrs. Callahan, was the daughter of Mrs. Elliot Mustaine, of Sidney, O., and had been ill for over a year and the wife of Major Patrick Callahan, who is located at Ft. McKinley in the Philippine Islands.

She leaves besides her husband and three sons, one sister and three brothers. The remains will be cremated and returned to the Philippine Islands for burial.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 16, 1938

Died --- Aaron M. Cloy, 87, passed away Saturday morning at his residence on Market street, East Side. He had lived all of his life in Darke county and was a member of the U. B. Church. The funeral took place this afternoon from the Fraze Funeral home, conducted by Rev. Hilemon. Interment in the Hollansburg cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, May 17, 1938

Lived Here - Mrs. Eric O. Thompson passes away at her Indianapolis home. - She was formerly Miss Maud Kemp, daughter of Frank Kemp.

Mrs. Ed Fowler received word from Indianapolis today that Mrs. Eric O. Thompson of that city passed away yesterday noon. Mrs. Thompson was formerly Maud Kempand she was born at North Salem, later residing in Union City. The deceased leave a husband. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon. Among those going down from here will be Mr. and Mrs. Ed Fowler, Mr. and Mrs. George Roush and Oliver Aukerman.

Mrs. Thompson left Union City some thirty-five years ago. She was the daughter of Frank and Alice Kemp, and when she arrived at marriageable age she was united in marriage to Eric O. Thompson, a bookkeeper at Ft. Benjamin Harrison and she lived the rest of her life after her marriage in the capital city. Besides the above she is survived by one sister, Mrs. Pearl Walsh, of Racine, Wis.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, May 18, 1938

Long Illness - Precedes the death of Mrs. Harry E. Bitner this morning. - She had lived most of her life in Union City.

A mantle of sorrow has settled over the home of Harry C. Bitner, over the death of his faithful helpmate and wife, Mrs. Minnie E. Bitner, who passed away this morning at fifteen minutes to eight o'clock after a long illness, the cause of death being paralysis, the first attack of which she sustained in 1935. She had another attack in 1936, and still another attack January 19, 1937, since which time she had been an invalid. She was forced to seek her bed a week ago last Thursday, and from that time on she never rallied but grew steadily weaker, the end coming as stated above.

Mrs. Minnie E. Bitner was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Wise, and she was born in Gallion, O., Jan. 22, 1882. When about a year old her parents moved to Union City and Mrs. Bitner resided here the rest of her life. Her father died 4 years ago and her mother followed him two years later.

Mrs. Bitner attended the West Side school, and at the close of her school life she became employed at the Backstay Welt Co.

July 27, 1905, she was married to Harry C. Bitner of the Weimer grocery, and who with one son, Harry D. Bitner survives her. She is also survived by one grandson, Harry Wayne Bitner, and two brothers, Clarence Wise and Paul Wise, both of Union City.

Mrs. Bitner was a faithful wife, a good mother and a fine Christian woman.

She was a member of the Church of the Brethren and during her years of health was a devoted attendant of the services. She was of a pleasant disposition and many friends will mourn her passing.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home from where it will be returned to the late home on the departed, 229 South Plum street at 4 p. m. Wednesday and where friends may call after that hour.

The funeral will be held from the Church of the Brethren, Friday, May 20, in charge of Rev. D. G. Berkabile. Burial in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 20, 1938

Old Resident - James C. Bradford passes away after a short illness. - He was the father of Grant Bradford of the Bradford garage.

James C. Bradford of near Haysville, died last night at eleven o'clock after only a few hours illness with acute indigestion, at the home a short distance south of Haysville, on the Jackson pike.

James C. Bradford was born in Greensfork township, Randolph County, April 27, 1865, and he was therefore about one month past seventy-three years of age at the time of his death.

He was the son of Henry and Betsy Johnson Bradford and he attended school number 21 in Greensfork township. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Lacey at Rural, Ind., in 1897, who preceded the husband in death five years ago.

Four children were born to this union, all of them living as follows: Mrs. Clarence Sutton, Mulberry street; Mrs. Charles Trine, 354 Carter street; Mrs. Wm. Manning, Union City and Grant Bradford, of the Bradford Garage. Also the following brothers: Wm. Bradford, Anderson; Ted Perry Bradford, Winchester; George Bradford, Celina, Ohio. Also sisters Mrs. Barbara Moorer, Winchester; Mrs. Eva Ferris, Ft. Wayne, Ind. One sister died in infancy.

There are also three grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Mr. Bradford was a farmer by occupation. He was honest and four-square in all his dealings and was an honored and respected citizen. He lived all of his life in Randolph county and he with his family moved to the present home about a mile and a half south of Union City, twenty-five years ago.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home from where it will be returned to the family home and where friends may call.

The funeral will take place Sunday, May 22, at Mt. Zion church at 1:30 (C.S.T.) conducted by Rev. Earl Lantz and the music will be supplied by Rev. and Mrs. Lantz. Burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 23, 1938

Resided Here - Mrs. George Wiggins passes away after long illness in Kentucky. - A member of the First Methodist church and lived here many years.

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. George B. Wiggins, which occurred Saturday evening at 7 o'clock at Lakeland, Ky., where she was taking treatment. She was making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Myrtle Metts, at Covington, Ky., to which place she went when she left here two years ago.

Mrs. Wiggins was born in Elwood, Ind., 72 years ago and she was the daughter of Henry and Margaret Northlane.

When she was a small child, her parents moved to Hagerstown, Ind., where she grew up and attended school. She also attended The Oldenburg school.

She was married to George B. Wiggins, a well-known transfer man of this city and who passed away twenty-four year ago.

After marriage, the young couple established a home on South Columbia street, where the subject of this sketch resided until several years ago when she left for Covington, Ky., to make her home with her daughter.

Mrs. Wiggins was a member of the first Methodist church and the Ladies Aid Society and during her residence here she was a faithful member and an active worker. She was a fine Christian woman and many friends here will mourn her passing.

She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Mae Simpson, Vallejo, Calif., Mrs. Myrtle Metts, of Covington, Ky., and Mrs. Laura Corblay, of West Chestnut street this city; one brother, Charles L. Northlane of the Pierce Elevator Co., and several grandchildren.

The body was taken to the Salem Avenue Funeral home in Dayton, O. The funeral will take place Tuesday, at 10:30 a. m. in Dayton, O., and the burial will take place in the family lot at Hagerstown, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 23, 1938

Injury Fatal - Roy Kemp succumbs to wounds received in an auto accident. - The funeral service will take place at Dayton and New Lisbon.

Roy Kemp, 50, formerly of Union City, died at noon Saturday in a hospital at Dayton.

Death was caused by injuries sustained in an automobile accident near Dayton May 11.

There will be two funeral services; one at Dayton at 10:30 (E.S.T.) Tuesday a. m. and another at the New Lisbon church north of Union City at 2:00 p. m. (C.S.T.) Tuesday.

The body will lie in state at the New Lisbon church from 12:30 to the time of the funeral.

Interment will be in the New Lisbon Cemetery.

Charles Leroy Kemp, the youngest child of the late Rev. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Kemp, was born Feb. 5, 1888, in Jackson Township, Randolph County, Ind. Went to common school in Jackson Township; moved to North Manchester with his parents and attended college there. In Nov. 1906 he was married to Grace Sutton of Jackson Township.

For a number of years he was a well known farmer of this vicinity, but went to Dayton several years ago and was employed at the National Cash Register.

Preceding him in death were his parents, one brother Lewis, one sister Mrs. Charlotte Peden, and one daughter Marjorie.

Surviving are his wife, one son Arthur of Dayton, and one granddaughter. Also one brother, Rev. A. E. Kemp, of Elyria, Ohio, and the following sisters: Mrs. Blanche Frank of Union City; Mrs. Minnie Roush of North of Union City; Mrs. Roberta Milligan, of Shideler, Ind.; Mrs. Daisy Rickert, of Saratoga; Mrs. Eva Circle, of Sidney, Indiana; Mrs. Ethel Perry, of North Manchester, Ind.

The accident in which Kemp was killed occurred when a man with a trailer turned a corner so fast that he swung the trailer around into the Kemp car. The accident happened not far from where he lived on the farm that he was managing.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 23, 1938

J. A. Long dies near Portland.

Portland, Ind. - Joseph A. Long, 72, one-time president of the J. A. Long Company of Portland and long recognized as the most extensive dealer in poultry, butter and eggs in the United States, died at 11:30 o'clock Friday morning at his country home, one mile east of Salamonia. He had been in failing health since last October when he suffered a stroke of paralysis. He was born in Warsaw, Ind. November 23, 1865, the son of John and Hannah Stauffer Long. In 1887 he was married to Mary Tipton, who survives with one daughter, Mrs. Mabel Rice of Union City; one granddaughter, Hazel, and one sister, Mrs. Ida Yost of Norristown, Pa. The body was removed to the Baird funeral home to be prepared for burial. The funeral was held today. Interment in the Portland Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 23, 1938

Died --- Mrs. Alice Bragg at the home of her son, Lewis Bragg, 540 N. Plum street, age 71 years. The body was taken to the Brooks Funeral Home where friends may call. Funeral services will be conducted at the United Brethren church in Saratoga. Rev. Earl Lantz officiating. Interment in the Saratoga Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, May 26, 1938

Passes Away - Mrs. Emma T. Knapp succumbs after several months illness. - She was the widow of the late Alex Knapp, founder of the Knapp Supply Co.

The death of Mrs. Emma T. Knapp, which occurred this morning at 5 o'clock will cause a shadow of sorrow to settle over our city, for she was one of our most respected and honored women. Death followed several months illness, which was caused by a fall she sustained at her home, 349 South Columbia street, about five months ago.

Mrs. Knapp was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James L. Slough, and she was born in Delaware, Ohio, 85 years ago. There she grew up and attended school.

She was married 49 years ago to the late Alexander A. Knapp, one of Union City's most prominent businessmen and the founder of the famous Knapp Supply Co., branches of which still exist at Indianapolis and in Muncie. AT her marriage she came to Union City and she has been a resident here since that time.

She was a sister of the late James L. Slough, Jr. and George A. Slough. One sister only remains, Miss Ida Slough of this city.

Mrs. Knapp was a woman of fine intellectual attainments and her coming meant much to Union City and its social and economical welfare. She was a charter member of the Ticknor Club and during her years of health she was very active in the clubs' social and literary work.

She was also a fine musician and pianist and a charter member of the Cecilian club in which she also took an active part. She never affiliated with any particular church but she was deeply religious and imbued with the Christian spirit and was always ready and willing to do her full share in church activities. She was a woman of pleasant personality and many friends will mourn her death.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home, from where the funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock (C.S.T.) Interment in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, May 31, 1938

Woman - Is found dead in her home in Darke County. - $3,513.57 was found near Mrs. Amanda Cox.

Greenville, Ohio -- Mrs. Amanda Cox, 83 year old Castine widow, was found dead in bed at her home on the west edge of Butler township at 4 p. m., Thursday, by her nephew, Blair McGriff. Currency notes and bank certificates of deposit, totaling $3,513.57 were found beside her body.

According to Coroner L. N. Brumbaugh, who investigated, death was due to an attack of acute indigestion. Death according to the coroner occurred 72 hours before the nephew called at the residence. Mrs. Cox was last seen alive by neighbors Monday morning. The nephew, who lives near Castine, visited his aunt Sunday afternoon.

The money and bank certificates were found in two pocketbooks under a pillow on Mrs. Cox's bed.

Pending settlement of the estate of the deceased, her personal belongings have been turned over to court officials.

Mrs. Cox had lived alone for 17 years, since the death of her husband. The couple had no children and nephews and nieces are the only immediate survivors.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 6, 1938

Died --- Word came to this city this morning of the death of Oliver E. Davis, 75, at his home in Winchester, Ind., where he has been ill for several weeks. He was one of Winchester's most out-standing, influential citizens, being in the automobile agency and garage business and a life-long Democrat, who numbered his friends by the legion.

The funeral will take place at the residence, 300 South Main street, Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. Lee Jackson, of the Main street Church of Christ, will officiate. Interment in the Winchester cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, June 10, 1938

Well Known - Isaac O. Butt succumbs to illness at home hear Springhill. - He is survived by the widow and family of six children.

Isaac O. Butt died very suddenly yesterday (Thursday) afternoon of a brain attack at his home three miles southeast of Union City on the Springhill road.

Isaac O. Butt, was born in Washington township, Darke County, Ohio, sixty-one years ago and he lived all of his life in Darke count. He spent his life in farming and he was an authority of farming and soil tillage and products. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Butt. He was a Christian gentleman and he was interested in the fine family of which he was the lead.

He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Jennie Butt, and the following sons and daughters: Erma West of Coletown, O., Otto, at home, Leland, Union City, Mrs. Hazel Stivers, East of the Jackson, O. school, Evelyn Rose, Union City, Mrs. Irene Waters, of Woodington, O.

The body was taken to the Brooks funeral home from where it was returned this afternoon to the home, where friends may call.

The funeral will take place in the Teegarden Church, Sunday at 2 p. m. (C.S.T.), conducted by Rev. John A. Watson. Burial in the Teegarden cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, June 15, 1938

Born In Union City - Miss Nina Williamson succumbs to life long illness. - She was the daughter of Harry Williamson who died in 1919.

Miss Nina Williamson passed away last night (Tuesday) June 14th, at eight o'clock. She had been an invalid practically all of her life, but she bore her misfortune with a Christian fortitude and patience, that endeared her to all who knew her.

Nina Williamson was born in Union City, O., 19 years ago in the house on East Main street, which is now occupied by the Wilson Pinney grocery store, and she was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Williamson.

The father Harry Williamson died in 1919, and after several years the mother of the girl was married to George Rhoades.

Miss Nina was given a good home by Mr. and Mrs. Rhoades, residing 3 miles east of Popular Grove church, and where she passed away at the time stated above. She is survived by the mother Mrs. George Rhoades.

The body was taken to the Brooks Funeral Home, from where it will be returned to the Rhoades home, and from where the funeral will take place Friday at 3 p. m. (C.S.T.), conducted by Rev. Earl Lantz, and Rev. Lantz and Mrs. Lantz will supply the music. The interment will take place in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 16, 1938

Attack Fatal - James Mangas succumbs to cerebral stroke this morning. - An outstanding citizen and prominent in church work.

In the death of James Mangas, Union City loses one of the most outstanding and best liked citizens. He had been somewhat under the weather for some months, but seemed to be recovering and was able to attend to his business. Friday late in the afternoon he went over to the home of his stepson Fred Leon Downing, 732 West Hickory street to pick strawberries. While thus engaged, he was smitten with an attack of cerebral hemorrhage and fell forward to the ground. His daughter Phyllis Joan and Mrs. Hollinger discovered him and they called Fred Downing, who summoned the Brooks ambulance which removed him to his home 710 West Oak street. A doctor was called but if he recovered consciousness at all it was only momentarily. Alva Downing who helped to care for the stricken man thinks that there might have been such a momentarily recovery Monday morning. However, it was a mere motion of the hand, and was of course, unaccompanied by any words. He passed quietly and peacefully away at half-past eight o'clock this morning.

James Perry Mangas, was the son of Casper Mangas and wife and he was born on the old home place in Jackson township, Ind., May 10, 1870. He grew up on the farm and attended the Jackson school.

For a while he made his home with Rev. and Mrs. Enoch Polly in Pennville, Ind. He was twice married, the first Mrs. Mangas passing away about twenty years ago. He was married Oct. 16, 1927 to Mrs. Pearl Downing who with one daughter Phyllis Joan Mangas and one step-son Fred Leon Downing survive. There are also two grandchildren and one brother, Charles Mangas of near New Lisbon and who is the last surviving member of a family of eleven children.

When still a young man who took up carpentry and architect work, and he became one of the leading men in this section of his line.

He was associated with his brother Architect, George Mangas and Architect Hampton Gettinger and they built many of the better building in Union City.

James Mangas was a real Christian and a prominent member of the First Christian Church in this city, to which he held several important official positions, including that of Superintendent of the Sunday school.

He was one of our most likable men, of a very cheerful and pleasant personality and his friends were legion. He always had a word of encouragement for those he met. He has meant much for the improvement of the city of his adoption, and he will be sincerely mourned and long remembered.

The body was taken to the Brooks Funeral Home from where it will be returned Friday to the family home, where friends may call.

The funeral will take place Saturday June 18th at 4 p. m. from the First Christian church conducted by Rev. Ben Holroyd. Burial in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 20, 1938

Angel Beckons - The death of David Kaucher a great shock to the community. - Succumbs to streptococci attack after comparatively short illness.

All Union City mourns today over the passing of one who, although still a mere boy, had, by his exemplary life so endeared himself to the hearts of the community that he will never be forgotten.

David became ill a week ago last Monday with what is known as a blood steam streptococci attack. A day or so later pneumonia also set in. He was placed in an oxygen tent and everything humanely possible was done for him but the angel of Death had beckoned and all proved of no avail. He passed away at 15 minutes past 5 o'clock Saturday morning June 18.

David Clifford Kaucher was born in this city July 9, 1921 and had he lived until the 9th of next July he would have been 18 years of age. He was the son of Clifford and Flossie Sharp Kaucher and he was a member of the 1939 West Side graduation class. He began his school career in the Kindergarten and he never halted in his stride on the educational pathway up to his senior graduate year.

He showed an early fondness for music and at the age of 6 began the study of the violin on which instrument he became quite proficient and next year would have occupied one of the first chairs in the West Side high school orchestra. In his 11th year he began carrying newspapers for the Hook Book Store, where his bother before him had been a favorite clerk.

Like everything else which he undertook David made a success of carrying newspapers and he became a fine, dependable carrier boy.

At school his work was also outstanding. Among other things he took on the study of the great Sousaphone horn and his great Sousahorn with the champion high school band and with the brass sextette, all of which is still fresh in the memory of all. He not only helped his band and orchestra to win the state championship, but he brought fame to Union City by winning the state championship as a Sousaphone soloist. He also won second place in the National contest at Elkhart in which the band also won high honors.

About a year ago he accepted a place in the department of the Kirshbaum store and he was considered one of the company's most valued men.

He took a great interest in his school work and was a member of the Student's Council and Junior Editor of the Successus, the school paper.

He was also a deeply religious boy and a member of the First Methodist Church and was one of the church's vice presidents. He was a teacher in the Sunday school Junior department, which place he had filled exceptionally well for the past year. He also sang in the church choir and high school glee club and was a member of the boy's vocal sextette. He also played violin in the church and Sunday school orchestra.

It might also be mentioned here that the Ohio Northern College of Ada, O., under the impression that David had graduated , offered him a scholarship in that institution of learning.

So it will be seen that although very young he assumed many responsibilities, in all of them he acquitted himself in a way that was a credit to him and to those with who he was associated.

David C. Kaucher was a manly, likable fellow whom it was a privilege to call friend. He was loved and admired by all who knew him and his memory will long endure on the course of history of the city that was blessed by his brilliant young life.

He is survived by the parents and one brother Edward on who this sad blow falls hardest and the heart of the community goes out to them in sympathy in their irreparable loss and great sorrow.

The body was taken to the Fraze Funeral home from where it was returned to the family home at 811 West Elm street.

The funeral will take place this afternoon at 3 p. m. from the Methodist church conducted by Rev. Carl Adams. Burial in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 21, 1938

Suicide - Maxville Cemetery caretaker ends his earthly career. - Shoots himself with a rifle in his home.

Farmland, Ind. -- Charles Herron, 52, caretaker at the Maxville Cemetery for three years, was found dead early this morning at his home at the cemetery by Carl Ritchie and Roy Pursley of Farmland. Coroner Lowell Painter reported Herron died from a self-inflicted wound and said the man had been having domestic troubles. A .22 calibre rifle was used.

Surviving are the widow, two daughters, Mrs. Glenda Wright of Fort Wayne, and Mrs. Mildred Keisland of New Haven; two sisters, Mrs. Nina Thornburg of near here and Mrs. Opal Moore of Winchester; a brother Roy Herron of near here and a step-daughter, Mrs. Joseph Green of Maxville.

The body was brought to the Thornburg funeral parlor here pending the completion of funeral arrangements.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, June 22, 1938

Funeral services for Andrew Loehr, 66, retired Big Four Railroad conductor, who died Sunday at his home in Indianapolis following an extended illness, will be held in the Fraze Funeral Home here Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment will follow in the Union City cemetery. Loehr, who was a native of this city, was a Big Four conductor 46 years, retiring last April. He is survived by his wife; two sons, Glen of Bellfontaine, O., and Charles of Wooster, O.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 23, 1938

Hears Fight - Then dies shortly afterwards of heart attack. - Wilson A. Hall dies at his home in Winchester, Indiana.

Winchester, Ind. - Excitement over the Louis-Schmeling championship bout proved fatal last night to 69 year old Wilson A. "Dick" Hall, a Winchester laborer.

Hall, who had been listening to a broadcast of the fight in his home at 638 Residence street, dropped dead at the conclusion of the battle. Death was attributed to a heart attack. He had been a life-long resident of this city. No funeral arrangements have been made.

He is survived by the widow Ida; three daughters, Mrs. Dorothy Hammond, Mrs. Virginia Garrett and Mrs. Helen Mosler, all of Winchester; two sons, Gordon and Carlton, both at home; two sisters, Mrs. O. E. Davis of Winchester and Mrs. Ida Anderson of Lynn; and one brother, Charles of this city.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 23, 1938

Visited Here - Carl Spence, 70, oldest mail carrier in Blackford County dies. - He was the Uncle of Mrs. Coleen Keller of this city.

Miss Coleen Keller, of the Princess Beauty Shoppe, received word from Hartford City, Ind., announcing the death of her uncle Carl Spence. He was seventy years of age and was one of the oldest rural mail carriers in the county.

Mr. Spence began the work of carrying mail in the rural districts in 1899. He was the first rural mail carrier to be appointed in Blackford county. After his appointment he worked steadily from 1899 to 1932, when he retired on a pension.

He had been ill for the past two years, and he passed away Wednesday, June 22, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

He is survived by the widow and one brother, William Spence of Hartford City.

He had visited in Union City on many occasions, during which time he made a number of friends here who were always glad to welcome him to Union City, on the occasions of his visits here. The funeral and burial will take place in Hartford City.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 23, 1938

Former Ridgeville teacher succumbs.

Ridgeville, Ind. -- Mrs. Eva Ginger Cook, 82, teacher in this community for more than forty years, died at 1:30 o'clock this morning at the home of Ella Favorite here. She is survived by one brother, Oscar Ginger, of Richmond.

The body will remain at the Middleton funeral parlor here until 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon, when it will be taken to the Ridgeville High School auditorium for funeral services at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in the Ridgeville Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, June 24, 1938

Died --- Wednesday at 3:30 p. m., June 22, 1938, D. W. Skidmore, at his home in Ephridge, Tenn., age 83 years. Will be buried in Ephridge, Tenn., Friday. Formerly of this city.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 27, 1938

Death Calls - Former mayor C. J. Gunckel passes away after short illness. - He was one of Union City's most prominent citizens and church members.

The entire city today mourns the passing of a good man and one of the city's foremost men, C. J. Gunckel, who passed away Saturday morning at eight o'clock after a week's illness, although he had not been in robust health for several years.

Charles Joseph Gunckel was the son of Phillip and Sarah Shuder Gunckel, and he was born Oct. 31, 1861, and he was therefore 77 years and six months of age at his death.

He was born in Germantown, Ohio, where he attended school and grew up. When quite a young man he entered the baker's trade, and he came to Union City to work for the Bab Clark bakery more than 60 years ago. He became a master baker, and followed that business most of his life.

He was married Oct. 31, 1883, to Miss Lucy E. Spring, of Germantown, O., the Rev. Ervin of the Methodist church. The young couple lived for awhile in Union City and moved from here to Urbana, O., and later to Germantown.

They moved back to Union City about 1892, and they bought the Wally White bakery and confectionery, located in the building now occupied by Robertson's print shop on West Oak street.

Not withstanding a long and serious illness which he suffered at the time, he fought his way through to win out and make a success of the business. For several years during this time he drove a bread wagon. Later he moved the business to Columbia street in what is now the Seman & Son market where he continued until his retirement from the baking business.

For a time he became interested in farms and farming. Again taking up business he and Shirley Harlan purchased the Coddington interest in the Coddington and Lewis Shoe store, on Columbia street.

The business was carried on for some years under the name of Lewis, Gunckel and Harlan, which was changed to Lewis, Gunckel and Tritt, when Charles Tritt bought an interest in the store in 1909. He continued in this business for several years and retired until some two years ago he bought out the Macy Confectionery on West Oak street in which business with his son Earl he continued up until the time of his death.

He also took an active part in city and church affairs, being a devout member of the First Methodist church, in which he held many positions of trust, being one of the Trustees at the time of his death.

He was elected Mayor of Union City in 191?, and served with distinction and to the benefit of the city. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge, the I.O.O.F. and Modern Woodsmen lodges.

His faithful wife, companion and business partner, Mrs. Lucy Gunckel, passed away in 1912.

The surviving relatives included one daughter, Mrs. Grace Gunckel Tritt, of Urbana, O., a former teacher of art in our schools, and two sons, Earl at home and Don Gunckel of Dayton, O., also four grandchildren and five great grandchildren.

Charles Gunckel was one of nature's noblemen, who has meant much to the city of his adoption, and he will be long remembered by the many who were proud to call him friend.

The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home where it will lie in state until the time of the funeral which took place this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Methodist church conducted by Rev. Carl Adams. Burial was made in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 27, 1938

Dr. John Hart Dies.

Dr. John Hart, 61, the well known veterinarian at Winchester, Ind., suffered a paralytic stroke Friday and passed away at the Randolph County hospital Saturday morning.

He was severely injured a year ago, by an animal and had not been in good health ever since. The remains were shipped to Newtonville, Mass., where five sisters reside and where the funeral and interment will take place today. He was a life-long member of the Portland, Ind. Elks lodge and was well known throughout Randolph county, having lived in Winchester, Ind. a great number of years.

Dr. W. E. Welbourn has taken over the late Dr. Hart's veterinary practice in Winchester, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, June 29, 1938

Attend Rites - Dr. and Mrs. S. W. Harrison return from funeral of his mother. - Mrs. Harrison, Sr. resided in this city the past two years.

Dr. and Mrs. S. W. Harrison arrived home last evening from Philadelphia, Miss., where they were called by the death and funeral of the doctor's mother, Mrs. Callie Harrison, who passed away Saturday night at 10 o'clock after a very short illness of only about two hours, the cause of death being a heart attack.

Mrs. Harrison resided in Union City with their son the past two years and made many friends during her stay here, who will regret to learn of her death. Previous to her last residence here she had visited in Union City on a half dozen occasions.

A few weeks ago she had gone to visit her sisters, Mrs. Emma Harrison, in Philadelphia, Miss and Mrs. Aggie Hayes, near Gulf Port, Miss.

Mrs. Callie Harrison was born April 27, 1855, and she was therefore in her 83rd year. She was born in Mississippi, where she attended school. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Horn, and when she arrived at young womanhood she was married to Henry Harrison.

She was a devout member of the Baptist church and she was as fine Christian woman.

She is survived by one son, Dr. S. W. Harrison, and wife and two sisters, Mrs. Emma Harrison, of Philadelphia, Miss., and Mrs. Aggie Hayes, of Gulf Port, Miss. Also one grandson.

The funeral took place Monday afternoon from the Harrison home in Philadelphia, Miss., conducted by Rev. Robert Allen and Rev. Parker. Burial in the cemetery at Walnut Grove, Miss., the former home of the departed.

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