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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 5, 1935

Union City Man. - Porter Pangborn passes away at his home in Portland, Ore. - He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Pangborn and graduate of Union City schools.

Mrs. Lulu Hanlon has received the sad news of the death of her nephew Porter Pangborn who passed away at his home in Portland, Ore. last Monday after a long illness.

The funeral took place from the late home of the departed in that city Wednesday and the remains were cremated.

Porter Pangborn was the son of Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Pangborn and he was born in Union City, his father who for many years was a railroad conductor, died some years ago and his mother passed away in this city Nov. 28, 1934.

Porter was popular in Union City's boy life during the 90's and he was a graduate of the West Side high school. After his graduation he took up newspaper work and for a time he was on the staff of the Chicago Tribune. Later he went to Oregon where he was successfully engaged in the confectionery business.

He was married to Miss Mary LaFollette, at Ft. Wayne, Ind. and she belongs to the famous LaFollettes of Wisconsin. There are no children.

Many old friends here will regret to learn of Porter Pangborn's death and they joined by the Times extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved widow and other surviving relatives.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 5, 1935

Swallows. - Bi-Chloride of Mercury tablets by mistake does Portland, Ind. man. - Deadly poison causes his death in the hospital at that city.

Portland, Ind. --- Forrest Bray, 50, local insurance agent, died in the Jay County Hospital at 7:40 o'clock Thursday evening from the effects of bi-chloride of mercury tablets taken by mistake a short time before.

Mr. Bray and his wife had taken a drive to Decatur and Berne during the afternoon, and as he did not feel well when they returned to their apartment, he took some tablets. They then went to the Walter Relief [?] home for a dinner engagement and he was taken seriously ill. He was rushed to the hospital, where he died.

On their way to the Reber home, Mr. Bray stopped and talked to a friend. He seemed in a jovial mood, the friend reported.

Besides the widow, he is survived by a son, Max. He was connected with a shoe company until a year ago and since that time he had been engaged in the insurance business.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 8, 1935

Found Dead. - Mrs. Elizabeth Tillson, 85, pioneer who lived at 1118 West Oak St., was found dead in her home at 3:15 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Minnie Hiatt, a niece, who had gone to the home to spend the afternoon and night, discovered the body on the floor in the kitchen. A meal had been prepared and was on the table.

A son, Jesse Tillson, of Toledo, visited his mother each weekend and left the home at 9 o'clock in the morning to return to Toledo. A daughter, Mrs. Charles Spanangle, of Columbus, Ind. is the only other survivor. Mrs. Tillson was a member of the Christian Church.

[Funeral services were conducted on Tuesday, July 9th at the Brooks Funeral home, conducted by Rev. Earl Lantz. Interment was made in the Union City Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 8, 1935

Mrs. Anna Dwinnell passed away Friday.

Mrs. Anna Dwinnell, 84, passed away at the home of her niece, Mrs. Jess Warner, near Lisbon, Friday night, after an illness of two weeks.

She had spent practically all her life in this community. She was united in marriage to Hode Dwinnell of this city, who died a few years ago.

The funeral took place from the Fraze Funeral Home chapel, Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier. Interment took place in the City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 9, 1935

Wm. Wolf. - The news of his death in Cleveland yesterday a great shock here. - He was for years one of Union City's leading young business men.

The news of the death of Will Wolf which occurred in a hospital in Cleveland, O., Monday afternoon July 8, 1935 proved a great shock here in Union City for he was intimately connected with our business and social interests for years. Although he had not been in good health for a year or two it was hoped and believed that he could eventually throw off his invalidism and regain his former good health and spirits.

It was partly owing to his ill health that the Wolf Brothers sold out their store here and also their business interests in Richmond a couple of years ago and moved to Cleveland. However instead of improving after retirement, Will Wolf became worse and his illness dates from last September and the following December he entered one of the Cleveland's executive private hospitals which he was destined never to leave alive.

William B. Wolf was born March 1, 1888 in Moscow, O., he being the son of Barney and Anna E. (Webster) Wolf, both of whom have preceded the son to the land of promise. Mrs. Wolf passing away 17 years ago and the father some three years ago.

When William was still of school age the family moved to Cincinnati, O., where he entered school and later he graduated from one of the Cincinnati High schools. He also graduated from business college and he was thus splendidly equipped for the brilliant business career for which he was destined. He, with his parents, came to Union City about 26 years ago and William B., with his father Barney Wolf and Brother, Mose Wolf, took over the dry goods store which had been established by Barney Wolf's brother-in-law, Julius Lewis, the present president of the Union City Glove and Match Co. Under the firm name of Wolf and Sons, they conducted a successful business in the Patchell room on Columbia street. Later the firm moved across the street to a handsomely rebuilt room, which about two years ago was sold to the Stecker Co., and is today one of the leading ready-to-wear garment establishments of our two counties.

In all of this active and enviable business success Will Wolf had a big part. He was possessed of a business intelligence of a high order and with it was a sound judgment. He was conservative but not to an extent that interfered with progress or enterprise.

Personally he was a man of splendid character and high aspirations. He was always pleasant and had a ready smile for those with whom he came in daily contact. He was generous to a fault and he was never called on in vain to personally assist or financially help out any good cause or work.

It follows naturally then that he had many friends who will sincerely grieve over his untimely death, and the Times desires to join them in extending sympathy to the heart broken brother and sister in their great loss and sorrow.

He was a valued and popular member of the local Elks Lodge which will send representatives to attend the funeral.

He is survived by one brother, Mose E. Wolf and one sister, Mrs. Betty Grossman of Cleveland, Ohio. Also an uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Lewis.

Funeral announcements will be made later. The burial will take place in Dayton, O., either Thursday or Friday.

[Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, July 11th at the River View Jewish Cemetery at Dayton, Ohio. There were graveside services.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, July 10, 1935

Winchester man is found dead in bed.

Winchester. --- George Brown, 59, was found dead at the home of his son, William Brown, South Main St. Coroner Lowell Painter reported death due to natural causes. Mr. Brown was a former resident of Marion and his body was removed there Monday morning. Funeral services and burial at Marion. Among the survivors, besides the son, William, was the widow.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 15, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Charles Willis passes at her home Saturday afternoon. - Had lived all her life in Union City and a true Christian woman.

Mrs. Tillie Willis 56, wife of Councilman Charles Willis, after an illness of over a year passed away Saturday afternoon, at her home at 116 Oak St., East Side, after an illness of over a year.

She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Kopp, and had lived all her life in this city.

She was a member of the Lutheran Church. Surviving besides the husband are a brother, Charles Kopp, of Union City, and two sisters, Mrs. Al Hutton and Mrs. Charles Lehman, of Dayton.

The body will be removed from the Fraze funeral home to the residence Sunday afternoon. Services will be conducted at 1:30 Tuesday afternoon at the family home, the Rev. H. A. Barth officiating. Burial will be in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 15, 1935

Suffocated - Randolph County baby smothers to death by bed clothing. - Sad death takes place at the Morgan Skilen home at Farmland, Ind.

Farmland, Ind. --- The five-months old daughter, Wanda Collen [Skilen], of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Skilen was accidentally suffocated by bed cloths at the home, two miles northwest of Farmland, about noon Friday. The parents, becoming alarmed, took the child in their car to the Randolph County Hospital at Winchester, but it was dead on arrival there.

The body was taken to the Thornburg mortuary and services were held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at Maxville Church with the Rev. Solomon Stoner in charge. Surviving are the parents, two brothers, Keith and Irvin, and the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Spillers.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 15, 1935

Lived Here. - Principal Fred Rubey, who died Saturday, resident here for 7 years. - He was the father of Mrs. Robert Proctor, who died 5 years ago.

The news of the death of Principal Fred Rubey was a shock to Union City for he was a resident here for seven years or during the period he taught in the Jackson and Wayne schools.

He had not been a well man for the past two years, although with the courage, and the fighting spirit characteristic of the man he continued his work until some weeks ago when, at his home in Spiceland, Ind., he became very ill. He was removed from Spiceland to the hospital at Terre Haute, Ind., where a major operation was resorted to in an effort to save his life, which however failed in its object and Mr. Rubey passed away Saturday evening at seven o'clock.

Fred Parks Rubey was the son of Ambrose and Lizzie (Alexander) Rubey and he was born on a farm west of Spartanburg, June 13, 1882, being 63 years of age at the time of his death.

He graduated from the Spartanburg school and also attended the Terre Haute State Normal and graduated from the Ball State College at Muncie. Later he obtained his master's degree from the Indiana State University.

He was married some thirty years ago to Miss Laura Harrison at the home of the bride in Plainfield, Ind., and who survives him with two children, Ambrose Rubey of Terre Haute, Ind., Mrs. Evelyn (Rubey) Dolan, wife of Carl Dolan, of Falmouth, Ind.

One daughter, Leah Rubey, wife of Robert Proctor of this city, died about five years ago.

In 1925 Mr. Rubey accepted a position as principal of the Jackson, Ind. school, a position he held to the entire satisfaction of the school board, and he was one of the most popular and best liked teachers whoever held that position there. When the tenure law came in Mr. Rubey severed his connection with the Jackson school and accepted the principalship at the Wayne school which position he held for two years when he resigned to accept the superintendency of the schools at Spiceland, Ind., about two years ago.

During the seven years he taught at Jackson and Wayne, he with his family, resided in Union City on West Division street and he and his interesting family were social favorites here.

Fred Parks Rubey was a splendid type of Christian manhood, of fine character and pleasant personality. Many friends here will sincerely mourn his passing and he has left a fine record as an instructor, as a Christian and as a man.

Besides the wife and children, he is survived by one granddaughter, Nancy Proctor, who makes her home here with her grandmother, Mrs. Charles Proctor, of Columbia street. The deceased was a cousin of Mrs. Bert Anderson of West Pearl street.

The funeral will be conducted by Rev. A. H. Ward of Noblesville, Indiana, who was the pastor of the First Christian Church here when Mr. Rubey was a resident.

The funeral will take place from the family home in Spiceland, Ind., Tuesday at 1:30 p. m. Burial in the cemetery at Spartanburg.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 15, 1935

Died. --- Martha Fetters, July 14, at the home of Bob Carson, three miles west of Union City, age 68 years. The body was taken to the Fraze Funeral Home where funeral services will be conducted at 2 p. m. Wednesday. Interment at Ridgeville Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, July 17, 1935

Murdered - Was a former Farmland man by a Minnesota bandit. - Charles Hancock was shot in a hold-up.

Farmland, Ind. --- Charles Hancock, 39, former resident here, was fatally wounded by a bandit in a holdup in his garage at Mankato, Minn., it was learned here today by relatives. He was preparing to go on a vacation trip with a fellow teacher in the Mankato schools and was loading his automobile when he was held up and shot in the abdomen. An operation was performed at a hospital there, but he only lived a short time.

The bandit escaped without getting any money and no trace of him has been found by the police.

Mr. Hancock was the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hancock, former residents and teachers in the school here. He also is survived by a brother Maurice Hancock of California, and his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Slonaker of Farmland.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 19, 1935

Died. --- Sarah Elizabeth Horine, passed away at the home of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Myrtle Jones, in Anderson, Indiana, July 17, 1935. Aged 74 years, 5 months and 12 days. Funeral services were held from the Morris Funeral Home, 530 North Columbia street, Friday, at 2:30 o'clock, in charge of Rev. Ira Clark of the United Brethren Church, assisted by Prof. Robert Rose, of Monticello, Ind. Burial in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, July 25, 1935

Asphyxiated. - Husband of former Union City girl found dead in garage. - Joseph Wooley is a victim of the deadly fumes of monoxide.

The news reached here yesterday of the accidental death of Joseph Wooley, 45, at his home in Painsville, O. He was the husband of Opal Dye, formerly of this city and a sister of Mrs. R. W. Reid.

From the details received here it is learned that Mr. Wooley was found in the garage at his home in Painsville and when found life had been extinct for some time. His death was caused by the deadly fumes of carbon monoxide gas.

Joseph Wooley was a well known and honored citizen of Painsville, and by trade he was a motor mechanic, employed in the railroad shops.

He was married to Miss Opal Dye of this city, who with two children, a son and a daughter, survive.

The remains will be brought to Union City and will arrive here Friday at noon.

The funeral services will be held from the Fraze funeral home Friday a 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier. The interment will take place in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 26, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Milford Stump passes away last night. - Had been a life long resident of this community.

Mrs. Milford (Minnie) Stump, 68, died at 10:45 o'clock at the home of her daughter Mrs. Leonard Bothast on Chatham street last night.

Mrs. Stump was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Davis and was born near Springhill, Darke county, August 27, 1866.

She attended the rural school in Miami County and was united in marriage to Milford Stump, at Fountain City, Ind., Dec. 15, 1891. To this union six children were born of whom the following survive: Mrs. Leonard Bothast, Union City, Ind.; Willis Stump, New Weston, O.; Herbert Stump, Dayton, O.; Ira Stump, Greenville, O.; and Ora Stump, of Germantown, O. One son, Roy Stump is deceased.

She is also survived by the following brother and sisters: Willis Davis of Arcanum, O.; Mrs. Charles Hinshaw of Winchester, Ind.; Mrs. Harvey Myer and Mrs. J. W. Outland, of Richmond, Ind., besides five grandchildren.

She was a true Christian woman and a life-long member of the United Brethren church.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral home where they will remain until the hour of the funeral and can be viewed.

The funeral services will take place Monday July 29th at 1:30 p. m. (CST) from the U. B. Church, conducted by Rev. Ira Clark. Interment in the Greenville, O. cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 26, 1935

Shotgun wound fatal to visiting Ohio child.

Winchester, Ind. --- Barbara Spitler, age ten, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Chester Spitler, of Middletown, O. died today of wounds received in an accident yesterday. The accident occurred when a shotgun accidentally discharged. The accident at the farm home of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Orr, her grandparents of near Saratoga, with whom she was visiting. The full charge struck the child in the arm and side. According to Philip Richter, playmate of the girl and the only eye witness, the two were playing in a shed, where the shotgun had been left lying on a box, and they accidentally knocked it off to the ground, the force of the fall causing it to explode.

Dr. Charles Spitler of Saratoga and her father were at her bedside at the Randolph County Hospital in Winchester.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 29, 1935

Two Killed - Charles Thornburg and Albert W. Hines in fatal auto accident. - Car crashes into a steam shovel on state highway.

Charles Thornburg, 60, and Albert W. Hines, 21, of this city, were killed about 12:30 o'clock Sunday morning, when their automobile, a Ford roadster, crashed into a steam shovel used in construction work on U. S. highway 30, four miles east of Warsaw, Ind. The two were headed west and their car, driven by Hines, was traveling about 65 miles an hour.

The steam shovel is being used in scooping muck from the right-of-way in order to eliminate dips and was located between the main highway and a short detour which has been constructed to accommodate traffic.

Danger signals are erected for a considerable distance to the east and flares were burning. Either the driver failed to see or heed these warnings, or his brakes failed to work and he was unable to negotiate the turn.

The steam shovel telescoped the auto and the two occupants were pinned in their seats. Both were dead before Dr. J. R. Baum, of Warsaw, arrived. Thornburg's skull was fractured. Hines had a broken neck, broken right leg and a broken left arm.

The remains were taken to Warsaw, Ind., where Coroner Paul Landes held an inquest and his verdict was accidental death. They were later turned over to R. R. Brooks, local mortician, who brought them to Union City to be prepared for burial.

They were enroute to Plymouth, Ind., to bring home Henry LeRoy Thornburg, 9 years old, who has been a pupil at the Julia Work Training school.

Both men have been employed at the Union City Body Co.

Thornburg, who resided on South Columbia street, is survived by his widow and eight children. Hines who was single, is survived by several brothers and sisters.

The Thornburg funeral will be conducted at the Brooks mortuary at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon and burial will be made in the Union City Cemetery. The funeral of Hines will be conducted at 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the Bluff Point church in Jay County, and burial will be made in the nearby cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 29, 1935

Passes Away. - Mrs. Janie Smith dies at the home of her daughter in this city. - Was here visiting when she was stricken.

Mrs. Janie Smith, 78, of Shelbyville, Ind., passed away Sunday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. C. Merritt, on West Oak street, where she had been visiting, following a paralytic stroke a few days ago.

The remains were taken to her home in Shelbyville, Ind. where the funeral services and interment will take place Wednesday morning.

Mrs. Smith is survived by three sons, Clyde of Dallas, Texas, Russell and Elton of Shelbyville, Ind. and three daughters, Mrs. Hazel Payne of Indianapolis, Mrs. Carrie Dorrow, of Monticello, Ind. and Mrs. J. C. Merritt of this city.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 29, 1935

Proves Fatal. - Does the gunshot wound sustained by Greenville, O. boy. - Was playing "Cowboys and Indians" when accident took place.

Greenville, Ohio. --- A game of "Cowboys and Indians" played by Billy Runner, Jr., seven years old and his "pal" Bobby Myers, six years old, July 17, had a tragic ending Friday night when young Runner, son of Mr. and Mrs. William C. Runner, Twelfth Street, died at the local hospital of a bullet wound in his chest.

The accident occurred at the home of the parents of young Myers, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Myers, East Water Street. Bobby secured his father's .38 caliber revolver and fired it, the bullet puncturing one of his playmate's lungs and the dome of his liver. Bobby, unaware the revolver was loaded, was prostrated with grief.

Funeral services for Billy Runner will be held at his parents' home at 2 p. m. Monday. Rev. Bowman Hostetler officiating. Burial will be in the Palestine Cemetery.

The youth is survived by his parents, one brother, and three sisters.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that William Runner, Jr. was born Dec. 28, 1927, the son of William C. Runner (b. VA). His mother was not identified.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 29, 1935

Man's Body. - Was found near the Pennsylvania Railroad track at Portland, Ind. - Farm worker known only as Harold Heller.

Portland, Ind. --- The body of a man known here as Harold Heller, 37, address unknown, was found along the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks, one mile north of Portland, about 7 o'clock this morning. The top of his head was torn off. It is believed that he was struck by a train about midnight.

The man had been working as a farm hand for the past three weeks for Willis Bye and other farmers, about two miles east of the place he was killed. His body was found about 400 feet south of the place where the railroad crosses an east and west road. He said he had no home, but that he was born at Sturgis, Mich. and had relatives at Fort Wayne and Decatur. Officer here were unable to locate them today.

Farmers for whom he worked said that he was eccentric in some of his habits. He would not sleep at the homes where he was working. He said he had a room in Portland, but he is not known about hotels and rooming houses here. It is known that at times he slept in fields northeast of Portland. It is believed that he either fell asleep along the railroad tracks, too near the tracks, or that he rode a train to this place and was killed when he tried to jump off.

He had left the Bye home early in the evening. Near his body were two packages of clothing purchased at Portland stores and $1.15 was found in his pockets. He was about five feet and three inches in height, was dark complexioned and weight about 140 pounds.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 29, 1935

Martin Costello dies.

Martin D. Costello, 74, passed away Friday afternoon at his home 628 West Division St. following a stroke last Tuesday. He was a retired influential farmer and had lived in this community all his life. He was born at Dayton, O., Nov. 11, 1860 and he leaves a wife and one daughter, Miss Kathleen and three sons.

The funeral service took place this morning from the St. Mary's Catholic church conducted by Rev. Father Michael Shea. Interment in St. Mary's Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 30, 1935

End Came. - Mrs. Edna Groth passes away at her home. - Had been ill for several months; funeral Thursday.

After an illness covering several months, Mrs. Edna Delight Groth, 31, passed away at her home at 815 North Union street. She was a life-long member of the Lutheran church from where the funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. H. A. Barth. Interment in the Lisbon cemetery.

She leaves her husband, Fred Groth and one son, Alfred and a daughter, Anna Jane, besides a host of relatives and friends to mourn her demise.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 1, 1935

War Veteran. - J. C. Platt, for years a leading citizen, answers last call. - He came to Union City about 1869 and engaged in business. - Served during nearly entire Civil War and got bullet thru body.

Another unsung hero of the great Civil War has joined the great majority of the old soldiers who gave their life's blood, that this nation might live. J. C. Platt passed away this morning after only a few days illness. Last Saturday he was stricken with what is known as slow paralysis. He was taken to the Union City hospital where he had every attention and service possible. But the sands of time were running low, and at 5 a. m. he closed his eyes in peaceful sleep and answered the last roll call.

James Clifton Platt was the son of James and Lydia (Greeley) Platt, the latter belonging to that Greeley family made famous by the great Horace Greeley, the editor. J. C. Platt was born in Cincinnati, O., Feb. 6, 1842 and he was therefore 93 years of age at the time of his death. He attended the district schools and after that studied at the Maineville Academy near Cincinnati.

He enlisted in his country's service in the big Civil War in which he served with distinction and bravery nearly the whole period of the war. In one battle he was shot by a bullet that entered below the heart and passed clear through the body net he recovered and as soon as he was well enough re-entered the service. On one occasion he carried the lieutenant of his company who was wounded and went down, from the battle field on his back while bullets were striking all about. Toward the close of the war he was accidentally cut in the knee by an axe in the hands of a fellow soldier who was chopping wood. He recovered but went through the rest of his life with a stiff knee. He was a member of the 112th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He received his honorable discharge from the service June 12, 1864, at Columbus, O.

Mr. Platt was married Oct. 26, 1871 to Lucy Cordelia Legg of Maineville, [Warren County] O. and two children were born to this union, Harry C. Platt, one of our well known business men and Frank Platt who died at the age of eight years.

J. C. Platt came to Union City about 1869 and he came with the Withams, with whom he was engaged in the lumber business. Later he sold out and for years conducted a book store in partnership with Wm. Swain in the room now occupied by the Gruber Cigar Store.

He once more entered the lumber business in partnership with George Carter. They took up trunk slat making and for a while, were the world's leading trunk slat manufacturers, shipping to many distant foreign countries.

Then in 1891 he bought the South Side grocery now conducted by the Weimer Bros., and he with his son Harry conducted this business for many years. Later on they purchased the Smith grocery in the room now occupied by Dr. F. M. Ruby. He retired from active business in 1915, while his son Harry continued the business until he sold out to embark in the electrical business.

J. C. Platt was of that class of real men who helped to make this country what it is. He was absolutely honest in all of his dealings with his fellowman. Coupled with this he was a real Christian and all his life was affiliated with the Methodist church. He was a well educated man and always pleasant and courteous in his daily associations. He was a member of the K. of P. lodge and also the Grand Army of the Republic. He was a public spirited citizen and served his city faithfully and well as a member of the city council. He had many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the surviving son. Mrs. J. C. Platt passed away Jan. 11, 1925. Besides the son, J. C. Platt is survived by one granddaughter, Miss Anna Platt, one of the capable and well liked teachers of the Wilson school.

The funeral will take place Saturday afternoon from the residence on South Howard street at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier and Rev. Forbes Robertson.

[There was no mention in this or in subsequent editions of the burial location.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 5, 1935

Brought Here. - The funeral of Stephen Porter held from the Teegarden Church. - He formerly lived on a farm near here and moved to Indianapolis.

Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Porter and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bailey attended the funeral of Stephen Porter at Teegarden cemetery yesterday. Stephen Porter was formerly a resident of the Teegarden community. He passed away at the home of his brother Cyrus in Indianapolis Friday morning after several weeks illness. There were services in Indianapolis attended by many of his railroad friends who came to know him through his brother "Cy" who is a retired passenger conductor. He is survived by two sons, Omer of Cincinnati, O., and George Porter of Dayton. He was a farmer for many years in the Teegarden neighborhood and many old friends here join in extending sympathy to the surviving relatives.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 5, 1935

Died --- Orville Petersime, 40, Jackson Township farmer, of seven miles northeast of here, east of Cosmos, who was stricken in a harvest field two weeks ago, died at his home Saturday Morning, August 3rd. at 6:45 o'clock. He is survived by his widow, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Petersime of Ansonia; two brothers, Roy, of Greenville and Herschel, of Columbus, O. Funeral services will be held in the Sugar Grove Church south of Cosmos Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock (EST), Rev. Daniel Mathis officiating. Interment will be in the Greenville Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 5, 1935

Proves Fatal. - Auto accident results in death of infant. - Locke child dies in 4-car wreck near Winchester.

Winchester, Ind. --- An 11 weeks old baby was killed in an auto crash near here Saturday night about 9:30 o'clock. The infant's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fay Locke of Winchester were injured in the collision which involved four machines. The parents are patients at the Randolph County Hospital where attendants said their condition is not critical.

Eleven other people involved in the collision escaped injury.

Pavement made slick by a slight drizzle of rain was held responsible for the accident, which occurred when the car of Clyde Spence, who was accompanied by his wife and their son, Robert, and Miss Aileen Elkins, skidded off the road a mile west of Winchester. The front wheels of the car went into the ditch. Omer Watson, of Henryville, stopped his machine a short distance away to assist Spence. Locke's machine, coming east, struck the Spence car and rolled over three times, striking another car driven by Carl Olinger of Muncie.

The baby was thrown against the side of the car and sustained neck and head injuries. Besides the parents, the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. George Locke, and Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Rockhill, all of Winchester, survive. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 12, 1935

Ted Murphy dies.

Louis Murphy or better known as Ted, brother of Leona Murphy of this city passed away Sunday morning at the hospital in Indianapolis where he had been since the 16th of May for treatment. Funeral services will be held from the Shurley Bros. Central Chapel, 946 North Illinois street, Indianapolis at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Burial in Crown Hill Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, August 13, 1935

Winchester woman succumbs to illness.

Winchester, Ind. --- Mrs. Elmira Sumers, 88, well known resident of this city, died at 8 o'clock tonight at her home on East Elm street here, following a lingering illness.

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Ott Burke, of Richmond; one son, Walter, at home; two sisters, Mrs. Frank Davis and Mrs. W. U. Davis, both of here; five brothers, Frank Rowe, of Richmond, Harve Rowe, of Muncie, Oliver Rowe of Harrisville, John and Harry Rowe, both of Winchester; four grandchildren and one great grandchild.

The body was removed to the Fraze funeral parlors, where funeral services will be conducted at 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. Burial will be in Fountain Park cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 15, 1935

Sudden Death. - Cassius Grimes expires at his home on Plum Street last night. - He was one of Union City's best known and highly esteemed men. - Engaged in the meat business for many years.

The death of Cassius Grimes which occurred yesterday in the early evening, was a great shock to Union City, for while he had arrived at a good old age he was apparently filled with vigor and vitality, and attended to his business almost up to the time of his death.

At five o'clock in the afternoon he drove to the country with George Crawford to look at a beef for his meat market and on his return to his home, 235 South Plum street, about six o'clock, he with Mrs. Grimes were sitting on their front porch, when Mr. Grimes complained of not feeling well and a shortage of breath. He was assisted to his room by Mrs. Rosenbush and Almeda Hawkins. His condition became alarming and Dr. Phipps and Miss Nell Moist, trained nurse were called. Everything possible was done for him, notwithstanding which the end came at ten minutes after seven o'clock.

Cassius Grimes was on of the best known and most highly esteemed men in Union City. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Henry Grimes and he was born near Hamilton, O., April 17, 1857. When fourteen years of age he came to Union City with his parents, brother Daniel, and two sisters, Mrs. Mary Ella Wise and Mrs. Rachel Belle Wills. His father engaged in the meat market business on South Columbia street, and his two sons assisted him.

Later the father retired from the shop and the two sons carried on the business. More than thirty-five years ago the Grimes Bros. sold out to George Ruff, and after retiring from business for about a couple of years, the brothers bought the building on Pearl Street where the present Grimes meat market is located.

By honest methods and friendly treatment the Grimes Bros. built up one of the best and most widely known meat markets in this part of the state.

Cassius or "Cash" Grimes as he came generally to be called was not only a credit to our business circles but he was socially prominent. He was a member of the Redmen, Golden Eagle and Odd Fellows lodges, and was also deeply interested in our civic affairs. He was a Christian man and was a member of the Lutheran church, and also was a valued member of the Lutheran Men's Society.

When still a very young man he was married to Miss Rosa Johnson, who died some 29 years ago. He was next married to Miss Emma Schmidt who passed away a few years after marriage.

Sept. 3rd, 1913, he was married to Miss Lizzie Rosenbush who survives him.

Cash Grimes was a genial, whole-souled man full of life and good feeling for his fellow man, who was always welcome in any circle he would care to join, and he has meant much and been worth much to the city of his adoption. His friends were legion and they joined by the Times extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved and grief-stricken widow, and brother, also to survive him are four nieces, Mrs. Harry Bitner, 229 South Plum street; Mrs. S. J. Fisher [of Union City], Mrs. Edith Finch, Calif.; and Mrs. Cleo Worrell, Washington Courthouse, O. Two nephews, Clarence and Paul Wise and also Mr. Wm. Shotzers who was brought up by Mr. Grimes and was almost like a son to him.

The funeral will take place Saturday at 2:30 p. m. from the home at 235 South Plum street conducted by Rev. H. A. Barth. Burial in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, August 21, 1935

Three Killed. - When train strikes automobile near Hagerstown, Ind. - Driver unable to stop car in time to avoid crash.

Newcastle, Ind. --- A fast Pennsylvania westbound train today claimed the lives of three Hagerstown persons when it struck and demolished the car in which they were riding at the Stout crossing east of here on state road 38.

The dead: Oliver Rhodes, 45, employe of the Perfect Circle Company of Hagerstown - Mrs. Mary Baney, 45, mother-in-law of Mr. Rhodes - Ethel Baney, 9, daughter of Mrs. Baney.

According to a threshing crew in a nearby field it was evident Mr. Rhodes saw the approaching train an instant before the crash as the car showed skid marks for some distance on the road. The bodies were mangled almost beyond recognition and identification of Mr. Rhodes was made possible by his operator's license which was recovered from the wreckage.

The crossing is not considered by railroad officials to be a dangerous one as the view of the tracks is unobstructed for a considerable distance.

The train was in charge of J. H. Brown, conductor, and A. J. Crowe, engineer. Ed Seowick, of Richmond, assistant train master was a passenger and he immediately took charge of the investigation.

Surviving of Mr. Rhodes are the widow, six children, Rosetta, 10, Thomas, 7, Virginia, 5, Joe Clair, 4 and Jean and Jan, 10 day old twins; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rhodes of Lewisburg, O. Mrs. Baney is survived by her husband, Edward of Hagerstown.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 22, 1935

Long Illness. - Causes the death of Daniel Wes. Brown. - Was one of most prominent stock raisers in the state.

After an illness of over a year Daniel W. Brown, 78, a prominent Jackson, Ind. township farmer passed away at his home Wednesday. Mr. Brown was one of the most outstanding farmers and stock raisers in this section of the country. A life long Democrat in politics and a man who numbered his friends by the legion. He is survived by his widow, Ida, and two daughters, Mrs. Glea Richer of South Whitney, Ind., Mrs. Vera Jones of Evanston, Ill., and his son, Joseph E. Brown. One brother, Frank Brown, of Flint, Mich., survives. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence. Rev. H. V. Cummins will officiate. Interment will be made in the Lisbon cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 22, 1935

Passes Away. - Mrs. Ida (Harnish) Bankson dies in Greenville Hospital. - Funeral will take place Saturday at Coletown, Ohio.

Mrs. Ida (Harnish) (Burns) Bankson died Wednesday afternoon at the Greenville, O., hospital. She formerly lived in Union City, Ind., and for awhile she and her husband operated a filling station at Coletown, before moving to Brock, Ohio.

She had been ill about two weeks and leaves a husband and a step-daughter, Lavone Bankson, besides her father, David Burns, and one brother, James, who lives in Union City and two sisters, Mrs. Dora Harter, who lives near Nashville, O., and Mrs. Zelma Siniard of Dayton, O., besides a host of relatives and friends.

The funeral will take place Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock (EST) at the Coletown church. Interment in the Manuel cemetery.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home Records, Ansonia, Ohio, states that she was born Feb. 26, 1884 near Ft. Jefferson, OH, the daughter of David Burns and Emma Kercher. Her husband was Irvin Bankson.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 26, 1935

Proves Fatal. - Indianapolis man died at Winchester, Ind. as result of auto accident. - Richard H. Edwards, 87 years old, fatally injured when struck by car.

Winchester, Ind. --- Richard H. Edwards, 87 years old, of 3905 Carlton Avenue, Indianapolis, died Friday afternoon at the Randolph County Hospital from injuries received Friday morning when he was knocked down by an automobile driven by Sherman Kring of Cromwell. The accident occurred at the intersection of Washington and Main Streets. The aged man was taken to the Randolph Hospital where it was at first thought his condition was not critical. The body was taken to the Clyde Montgomery Funeral Home in Indianapolis, Saturday morning.

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. William H. Balpthorp of Dayton; and three sons, Ralph H. Edwards, Indianapolis, with whom he lived; Walter E. of Indianapolis and Grover D. of Chicago.

Mr. Edwards was a retired building contractor of Indianapolis and had been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Merritt Peters in Winchester.

Mr. Kring, who was accompanied by his wife and two daughters, were en route to their home from Middletown, Ohio when their car struck the aged man. They were released following an investigation by the City and County officials. However, a coroner's investigation will be held Monday.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, August 27, 1935

Sad Death. - The mother of six children passes to her reward. - Mrs. Bessie Lee Walker died this A. M. after long illness.

After a long illness, Mrs. Bessie Lee Walker, wife of Alva Walker, died this morning at the home two miles north of Union City. She became ill Dec. 15, 1934, since which time she had been confined to her bed. Everything possible was done for her, but in spite of all her condition became serious May 15, 1935, and her long, brave fight came to an end this morning at five o'clock. The direct cause of death was heart failure.

Mrs. Walker was formerly Miss Bessie Arnett, and she was the daughter of Wesley and Rachel Arnett, both of whom have passed on.

Mrs. Walker was born Nov. 25, in Monroe township, Darke County, O. She attended school at Pittsburg, Monroe township, Ohio.

She was first marred to Samuel Koons, Sr. and who died many years ago.

The following children survive: Samuel Koons, Jr., James Koons, Mary Hall, Ithaca, O.; and Opal Koons, of Union City.

After the death of her first husband, Mrs. Koons was married to Alva Walker, who survives her.

Mrs. Walker was a fine Christian woman and a good mother, who lived for her family and many friends will mourn her going. The Times joins in extending a sincere sympathy to the bereaved husband and children.

The funeral will take place Thursday from the home. Burial in the Mote cemetery east of Arcanum.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 29, 1935

Sudden Death. - Mrs. Nellie Grubbs, mother of Mrs. E. C. Hoffman, passed away this A. M. - Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman had visited her yesterday when she was apparently well.

It was a great shock to Mr. and Mrs. Ervin C. Hoffman as well as to Union City to receive a message this morning from Brookville, O., bringing the sad news of the very sudden death of Mrs. Hoffman's mother Mrs. Nellie Grubbs and widow of Calvin Grubbs.

It was only last evening that Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman visited Mrs. Grubbs in Brookville and when they left on their return drive home, Mrs. Grubbs was apparently as well as ever and in good spirits. Her last visit here was about a month ago.

The cause of death was a heart attack.

The word was received here at 9:30 this morning and shortly after Mrs. Hoffman and her sisters, Mrs. Phillibaum and Mrs. Elmira Ugron, both of Brookville, who were visiting here were on their way to Brookville. Mr. Hoffman will join them as soon as he can arrange his business affairs.

Mrs. Grubbs was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Miller and she was born in Brookville, O., 69 years ago. She was a splendid type of American womanhood. She was a noble mother and her pleasing personality and gentle loving nature endeared her to her many friends, here where she has visited on many occasions as well as the friends in her home town of Brookville. The Times desires to join them in extending heartfelt sympathy to the sorrow-stricken children and other relatives.

Besides the above she is survived by one son, Calvin Grubbs and one brother, Rauce Miller.

The funeral arrangements will be announced later.

[Funeral services were held on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence.. Interment was made in the Germantown, O. cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 29, 1935

End Comes. - Miss Mamie A. Stoner passes away this morning. - Had been ill for over two years and recently underwent an operation.

Miss Mamie Agnes Stoner, 40, passed away at the Union City hospital this morning, following an operation for goiter. She had been ill for the past two years.

She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Stoner, who live near the Madison Township school in Jay county. Her mother passed away a few years ago.

Besides her father, she leaves a sister, Mrs. Dewey Smith, of near Antioch, and two brothers, Elvin Stoner of Midland, Mich., and Cecil E. Stoner, of Chesterfield, Ind.

The remains were removed to the Williamson Funeral Home in Portland, Ind., and prepared for burial and will be removed to the residence of the deceased this evening, where friends may call.

The funeral will take place at the Salamonia M. E. church, Saturday at 2 p. m., conducted by Rev. Ray Nolan. Interment in the Salamonia cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 29, 1935

Died. --- William McClure, at his home, 329 North Plum street, Thursday morning at one o'clock, age 60 years. The body was removed to the Brooks Funeral Home where the funeral services will be conducted Saturday at one o'clock, Rev. C. G. McCallister officiating. Interment in Connersville cemetery. Friends may call at the Brooks Funeral Home anytime after Friday noon.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 3, 1935

Died. --- William E. Frazier, aged 86, Monday at 7 p. m. The body was taken to the Fraze Funeral Home where funeral services will be held Wednesday at 2 p. m. Rev. Fred Bintz in charge. Friends may call at any time.

[The funeral of William E. Frazier took place Wednesday afternoon from the Fraze Funeral Home chapel, conducted by Rev. Fred Bintz, an old friend of the departed.. Mr. Frazier was a life-long resident of Randolph county and followed the carpenter trade and was a highly respected citizen. He leaves his wife and two children, Don J. Frazier, of the Harrison Printing Co., who lives south of this city and Mrs. Lifey Pearl Walton, of Denver, Colo. Interment took place in the Union City cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 3, 1935

Died. --- Joel Harter, 87 years old, died Saturday morning, August 31st, at 2 o'clock a. m. at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Andrew Austerman, three miles south of here.

Survivors are the daughter and a son, Lowell Harter, of Dayton, Ohio.

The body was removed to the Morris Funeral establishment for preparation for burial, and taken to the home of his daughter, where burial services were held, Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. Earl Lantz. Burial was made in the Hoover cemetery south of Union City.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 6, 1935

Called Home. - Rev. Ruth Hemphill passes away near Greenville after long illness. - The widow of the Rev. G. M. Hemphill and prominent in church circles.

After a long and useful life Mrs. Ruth Hemphill passed away at a home near Greenville, Ohio, Thursday afternoon, after a long illness covering a period of about fifteen months.

Rev. Ruth E. Hemphill was born April 10, 1852 in Lima, O., and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Sifert, moved to Wapakoneta, O., when Ruth was four years old. Here she grew up and spent her girlhood days, uniting with the English Lutheran church very early in life. The above was the only English-speaking church in Wapakoneta at that time.

She was married to Rev. G. M. Hemphill May 23, 1869.

One son was born to this union, Dr. Norton Hemphill, who died at his home in Greenville, O., May 4, 1899, and the loss of her son was a great blow to the mother much of whose life had been devoted to her only son.

Rev. G. M. Hemphill, the husband died some thirty-five years ago. He was the highly esteemed pastor of the First United Brethren Church of this city.

Both Rev. Ruth Hemphill and her minister husband were ordained in the ministry in 1898, and both were admitted to the Miami conference by Bishop G. Weaver.

Rev. Ruth Hemphill was of the type of fine Christian women who helped to build up the church of her adoption, and all of her life she was very active in church work. She was a highly educated woman and owned one of the finest private libraries in this section. It is said that Rev. Will Underwood who will assist at the funeral services, has had a great part of this library bequeathed to him.

Mrs. Hemphill resided in Union City for some years and she owned two residential properties on Sycamore street. Many old friends here will regret to learn of her death, but they have the comfort and happiness of knowing that she has gone to her sure reward, her heavenly home.

The body was taken from the Fraze funeral home to the late home on the departed, 117 Sycamore street, where friends may call after 6:30 p. m. today, Friday.

The funeral will take place Monday at 1 p. m. at the United Brethren church conducted by Rev. Will Underwood and Rev. Lewis G. Ludwick. Interment in the family lot at Greenville, O.

Mrs. Hemphill is survived by one sister, Miss Loretta J. Sifert and five cousins, Charles C. Sifert, Mrs. C. C. Hosseliman, Mrs. Lulu Osborn, Edward Sifort, and Willis Sifert, all of Lima, O.

Mr. Charles C. Sifert accompanied the remains to this city.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 6, 1935

Died. --- Edward Ayette, 48, former Greenville, O., and Versailles, O., saloon and pool room operator and at one time a noted ball player, died yesterday at the Greenville hospital.

His body was removed to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lois Ayette, North Center street, Versailles, from where funeral rites will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon. Burial will be made in Greenlawn cemetery, Versailles.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 6, 1935

Died --- Mrs. Lionia Sigler, 92, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Strait, 3 miles northeast of Union City, this morning at 11 o'clock.

Funeral services will be held from the United Brethren church in this city Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Ira Clark. Interment in the Union City cemetery. Brooks Funeral Home in charge.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 9, 1935

Former resident of Greenville is killed in Detroit

Greenville, Ohio --- Mr. and Mrs. John Lephart, Ansonia, Rural Route 1, were called to Detroit by the death of their daughter, Mrs. Catharine Brewington, 23 years old, who was fatally injured in an auto accident, Thursday evening.

Details of the accident were not disclosed but it was stated that Mrs. Brewington was killed instantly and her two children were injured. Her husband, Wayne Brewington, was not hurt.

Funeral services will be conducted from the Lephart residence on the Greenville-Ansonia road near the Detling Schoolhouse, either Sunday or Monday. Besides the husband, two children and her parents, she is survived by three sisters and three brothers.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 10, 1935

Obituary --- John William Blazer was born May 9, 1860 in Guernsey County, Ohio, near Cambridge. He departed from this life Sept. 5th, 1935, at the age of 75 years, 3 months and 26 days. He was married to Martha A. Tomlinson, April 14th, 1896. To this union were born five children, 3 girls and 2 boys. Two girls and one boy preceded him in death. Surviving are the wife, one daughter, Mrs. Etta Jones of Muncie, Ind., and one son, Sheldon Blazer also of Muncie, Indiana, eight grandchildren and three sisters, Nancy Rice of Rockford, Ohio; Mrs. Rosa Mix, of Fort Wayne, Indiana; Mrs. Alice Nichols of Muskegon, Michigan, and two brothers, Elwood Blazer of Columbus, Ohio, and Esworth Blazer of Jefferson, Ohio, and a number of nephews and nieces left to mourn their loss but our loss is his gain.

He was converted at the age of 18 and united with the Methodist church then he walked in the light as it came to him and later was identified with the Holiness people, but he didn't stop there but went still deeper and received the abiding Comforter thus he was ever ready to give an answer of the hope he had within. He was filled with the Spirit and rejoiced at home as well as at church often singing, "I Feel Like Traveling On," "My heavenly home is bright and fair, I feel like traveling on."

He has lived a faithful and true Christian life all these years. He was a faithful and kind husband, a loving father. He bore his affliction without a murmur or complaint, although his illness as of about 11 months duration.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, September 12, 1935

Mrs. Ed Cooper dead.

Mrs. Edward Cooper, 70, died last night at her home, 535 Vine street after an illness of several years. She leaves the following children besides her husband: Mrs. Orletta Thornburg, Miss Hazel Cooper and Ray Best, also one brother, William Simpson and a sister, Mrs. Wm. Welch of Lima, O.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral Home, and the funeral services will take place Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock, conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier. Interment will take place in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 13, 1935

Joins Husband. - Mrs. Gilbert Adams passes away at the home of her daughter. - She had been ill for several months and serious for weeks.

It was with great regret that the many friends learned of the death of Mrs. Gilbert Adams who passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Merman Westfall, one mile north of Carnahan church on the Fox pike, Thursday at 10:40 a. m. as announced in yesterday's Times.

Mrs. Adams became ill at her home on West Oak street last April and her condition became worse two months ago. She was taken to the Union City hospital two weeks ago. After one week at the hospital she was released to her home on Oak street, and from there was taken to the home of her daughter.

She received every care and attention together with the best of medical service, but the Grim Reaper would not be denied. She closed her eyes in peaceful sleep at the time stated above and rejoined her husband who preceded her to the better land some four years ago. He was a civil war veteran.

Mrs. Mary Jane Adams was the daughter of John and Betsy (Ohler) Worth, and she was born April 4, 1855, and was therefore some months past eighty years of age at the time of her death.

She was born on the old Worth place, near Springhill where she grew up and she attended the old Springhill school, which building by the way has been converted into a comfortable summer home by Mrs. Adam's brother, I. N. Worth.

She was married to Gilbert Adams Nov. 5, 1874, and they went to housekeeping one mile south of Union City. She with her family also lived near Greenville and later moved to South Jackson pike, where they resided for more than thirty-five years. She and her family moved to Union City eleven years ago and since then she lived here.

She was the mother of the following children: D. Web Adams, Fox pike; Roy Adams, Union City; Mrs. [Pearl]Herman Westfall, near Carnahan church; Arthur, who died 23 years ago; Oscar died at the age of 5 years, and Alva, who died in infancy.

Mrs. Adams was a splendid Christian woman and a member of the Methodist church and Ladies' Aid and during her years of activity she was always ready to do more than her share of any good work that needed to be done.

She was a good mother and faithful wife and she lived and wrought for her family. She was a woman of a pleasant disposition and was beloved by all who knew her, and a host of friends will sincerely mourn her passing. The Times wishes to join these in extending sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

Besides the above she is survived by one sister, Mrs. Lydia Bickel, Coletown, O., three half-brothers, I. Newton Worth of Indianapolis, Tom Worth, Union City, George Worth of California; one foster son, Robert Adams, and one grandson, George Gilbert Westfall of Carnahan.

The funeral will be held from the late home of the departed on West Oak street, Sunday, at 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. Earl Lantz and Rev. Barton. Interment in the Union City cemetery.

[An Obituary tribute published Nov. 15 stated that Gilbert Adams died in 1931 and that son Arthur died in 1913. There is no mention of a foster son but it is stated here that there was a foster grandson; possibly the Robert Adams mentioned above.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 16, 1935

Scalded. - To death was child when it fell into a tub of boiling water. - Alrita R. Patton meets untimely death.

Greenville, Ohio. -- Alrita Rae Patton, 11 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Patton, living one half mile east of Bear's Mill, died at the Greenville Hospital at an early hour Saturday morning from burns received when she fell into a tub of boiling water at the farm residence.

The tub was in the kitchen of the home. The child plunged headlong into it and was fatally scalded before her screams brought aid.

Funeral services will be conducted from the home of the child's parents, at 2 p. m. Monday. Interment will be in the Palestine cemetery. Besides the parents surviving relatives include three grandparents and three great grandparents.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that she was born Oct. 7, 1934, the daughter of Robert Patton and Louise Ketring.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 17, 1935

End Comes. - James E. Thomas passes away after a short illness. - Young man's death comes as quite a shock to his many friends.

James Euland Thomas, 22, passed away Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Union City hospital, following an operation last Thursday for appendicitis.

Mr. Thomas was the son of L. A. and Mary Thomas; he was born in Adams county, Feb. 11, 1913 and attended school at Portland, Ind. and graduated from the Jackson, Ohio school.

He was employed at the Royal Hatchery and Supply Co. for the past four years and made many friends in this community by his courteous and pleasant manner.

James Thomas, is survived by his mother, Mrs. Clara Thomas, his brother, M. A. Thomas of this city and three sisters, Mrs. E. F. Boese of R. R. 2; Mrs. Joseph Miller of Portland, Ind. and Mrs. Harold Lyons of El Paso, Texas. His father died last year.

The remains were removed to the Brooks funeral home, where they were prepared for burial and were today removed to the home of his sister, Mrs. E. F. Boese.

The funeral will take place Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Lutheran church, conducted by Rev. H. A. Barth. Interment in the Steel's Cross Road, Ohio Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, September 18, 1935

Died. --- Word came to this city, announcing the death of Josiah H. Meredith, 77, of Columbia City, Ind., father of Ray S. Meredith of this city. Mr. Meredith had been a resident of Columbia City, Ind. for over 55 years and was one of that city's most highly respected and beloved citizens. He is survived by a daughter Gertrude of Columbia City, and his son, Ray S. of this city; besides several grandchildren and other relatives. The Times joins the friends of Ray S. Meredith in this city in extending sincere sympathy in his bereavement.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 20, 1935

Mrs. John Zech dies.

Clara Zech, age 65, wife of John Zech, passed away at her home near Elroy, O., Thursday 11 a. m. after an illness of ten weeks.

She is survived by her husband, two daughters, Flossie Woods, Redkey, Ind., and Alice Pauline, Ansonia; and one son, Willard Zech of Union City; one daughter, Cora Pauline, passed away nineteen years ago.

She also leaves nine grandchildren and one great grandchild, one sister, Mrs. Fanny Murphy, and three brothers, George Strait and Sam Strait, of Union City, and John Strait of Greenville, Ohio.

Funeral services at 2:30 (EST) Sunday at Teegarden church. Burial at Teegarden cemetery.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home Records gives her name as Clara Zeck, b. Dec. 2, 1869, the daughter of Henry Strait and Rebecca Bailey.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 20, 1935

Died. --- The sad news reached here this morning through a telegram to the relatives of the death of Melvin Rensberger who died at his home in La Verne, Calif., after a long illness. He was about 50 years of age and he is survived by the widow who was formerly Miss Esther Simmons, daughter of W. K. Simmons. Mr. and Mrs. Rensberger formerly resided on the Lisbon road and many old friends here will regret to learn of Mr. Rensberger's death and extend sincere sympathy. The funeral and burial will take place in La Verne. One son, Gorman, also survives.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 23, 1935

Sad Death. -- Treva Lea Rinebarger after a brave fight passes away. - Was a member of 1932 class and stricken before graduation.

The death of Treva Lea Rinebarger which occurred at five minutes to 6 o'clock Saturday evening caused sadness over the entire community in which she lived. When still a school girl with bright prospects and everything to life for she became ill and while she made a brave fight she never recovered from that illness.

She became ill in 1932 only a matter of a few weeks before her graduation with the class of 1932 East Side school of which she was an honored member. She also had a leading part in the class play.

Although she was prevented from taking her place with her class a chair was arranged for her on the stage and as she had practically completed her studies she was awarded her diploma and was considered a full-fledged member of the class.

She was confined to her bed for over two years and while she was able to be up and about for a short time last summer she soon relapsed and three months ago she was taken to the Stillwater Sanitarium at Dayton where the end came as stated above.

Treva Lea Rinebarger was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rinebarger of near the Twin Bridges and was born Oct. 26, 1912 and she was therefore 22 years of age on her last birthday. She was born in a home on the State Line. As stated she attended school on the East Side where her pleasant personality and amiable disposition made her a general favorite. She was also a faithful student and stood well in her studies.

She was a good Christian girl and a member of the Hillgrove church where she also took a great interest in the activities of her church. She had many friends who will sincerely mourn her untimely death and the Times joins them in extending heartfelt sympathy to the sorrowing relatives.

Besides the parents she is survived by one brother, Charles Rinebarger, Union City. Also the grandmother, Mrs. Margaret Shank. One niece, Waveline Rinebarger and one nephew, Charles Deal Shaw.

A sister, Mrs. Mary Shaw died eight years ago.

The funeral will be held from the church at Hillgrove, Rev. Perry in charge, Tuesday at 2 p. m. (EST). Burial in the Lisbon Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 23, 1935

Died. --- The funeral of David Burns who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Seward in Dayton will take place at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harry Harter, one mile west of Nashville, O., conducted by Rev. Earl Lantz. Burial in the Hollansburg, O. cemetery. Mr. Burns was the father of James Burns and was an honored and respected resident of Liberty township.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 24, 1935

Known Here. - The husband of the former Miss Lipp dies in Mexico. - Marion Mercer was well known in science world as a mining expert. - He had visited here on several occasions when the Lipps lived here.

The following news story appeared in the Indianapolis Star and it will be read here with regret by many friends of the family.

The story appears under the following caption: "Mining Expert Dies in Mexico. Marion Mercer, son of City resident, stricken on research mission." The article follows:

Marion (Mike) Mercer, 36 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Mercer, 3105 Graceland avenue, died Sunday of pneumonia and heart complications in the Sanatatorio Marguerita in Guadalajara, Mexico. He was regarded as an expert in diamond mining and went last July to the state of Jalisco, Mexico, to do research work in mining.

He had completed his work and was returning home when he became ill about three weeks ago. His wife, and Mrs. Charles H. Lipp, 648 South Denny street, flew by plane from Chicago to Mexico when he became ill.

Word of his death was telephoned to Mr. and Mrs. Mercer Sunday by George Winters, American consul in Guadalajara, with whom Mrs. Mercer had made her home while in Mexico.

Mr. Mercer was born in Paxton, Ill. and was graduated from high school in New Carlisle, O. In 1920 and 1921, he attended Butler University, where he was a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity and captain of the Butler track team. He studied one summer in Purdue University and was graduated in 1930 from the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Col.

Since that time he had been assistant curator of mining at the Rosenwald Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago and had made his home there. He planned and directed construction of a model coal mine which is included in the museum.

Mr. Mercer also planned and supervised construction of a model diamond mine at A Century of Progress expedition. He traveled extensively in Europe to collect specimens for this exhibit, including the famous Hope diamond. Mining equipment used in the exhibit was brought by him from the Kimberley mines in South Africa. He was coauthor of a book, "The Story of Diamonds."

Mercer was married Aug. 7, 1924. Survivors besides the widow and parents are two sons, Richard Mercer, 6 years old, and Robert Mercer, 3; a sister, Alice Opal Mercer, and two brothers, Harold L. and George C. mercer, all of Indianapolis.

Mrs. Mercer was formerly Miss Helen Lipp and was known to her intimate as "Peg." She graduated from the West Side high school and was a member of the class of 1920. She also attended Mrs. Blakely's Kindergarten school, and taught school for a year or two.

The many friends here will extend heartfelt sympathy to the sorrow stricken young wife and two fatherless sons.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, September 25, 1935

Sad Message. - Mrs. Nell Branham receives news of death of Mrs. Bun Branham. - She was formerly Miss Rilla Cassell and resided in Union City.

The sad news reached here this morning through a telegram to Mrs. Nell Branham of the Death of Mrs. Bun Branham at her home in Nappanee, Ind. She was formerly Miss Rilla Cassell and was employed at the Branham hotel.

She was one of the most highly respected and esteemed women. Many friends here will regret to learn of her death and they with the Times extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved husband. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon at the home. Burial in the Nappanee cemetery.

Mrs. Nell Branham and Mrs. Nettie White will attend the funeral services.

Mr. and Mrs. Bun Branham left here many years ago and have resided in Nappanee ever since they left here. Mrs. Bun Branham is survived by the husband Bun Branham, and two sisters, Mrs. Charles Ochler, Miss Maggie Cassell and three brothers, Web. Abe of this city and John Cassell of Indianapolis. Also one sister who resides in Monroe, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, September 26, 1935

Illness Fatal. - The husband of the former Mrs. Lucile Chamness claimed by death. - Charles Camella Loses five months fight against Grim Reaper.

The sad news reached here late last night from Noblesville, Ind. of the death of Charles Camella, 30, which occurred at the home a little after 10 o'clock Wednesday night following a long sickness.

He was taken ill five months ago and though he made a brave fight against the Grim Reaper and had the best of care and medical attention, all proved of no avail to save the young man's life.

Mr. Camella was a prominent business man of Noblesville, where he owned and operated a large wholesale fruit house. He was a member of the Catholic church and stood high in the Elks Lodge of which he was a member and to which he held high office.

He was the husband of Miss Lucile Chamness, the daughter of Mrs. Frances Chamness of this city and the young couple was married seven years ago. Mrs. Camella was one of Union City's leading musicians, and a fine trombone soloist. She appeared as trombone soloist in the band concerts here and in Muncie and traveled for several years with a well-known concert company. She was a graduate of our West Side school class of 1921, and many friends here joined by the Times extend heartfelt sympathy to her at the hour of her sorrow and loss.

Mrs. Frances Chamness was motored to Noblesville last night by Joe Thornburg and Miss Nell Moist; the later two have returned home.

The funeral will take place Monday morning from St. Mary's Church in Indianapolis.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, September 26, 1935

Former Union City girl dies in Kansas.

A letter just received by A. B. Schuyler from Mrs. Beatrice Doty Humphrey, of Baxter Springs, Kansas, announcing the death of her oldest sister, Mrs. Nona Doty Opperman, which took place early Monday morning, Sept. 23rd at the Opperman home, 923 Lincoln Ave., that city.

Quite a number of the school classes of Union City of the 1880 to 1890 period, yet living in Union City will remember the Morris Doty family of the "Doty House," corner of Oak and Howard Sts. at that time.

Mr. and Mrs. Doty and their interesting family of five daughters and one son, were very popular in this community when they lived here; were very consistent in church work and stood high in the estimation of all who were fortunate in knowing them. The letter was written to Mr. Schuyler by Mrs. Humphrey who was familiarly known as "Trixie" when a school girl here. Mr. Schuyler has often visited there in their Baxter Springs home.

[Morris Doty, the father, was a Civil War veteran. He enlisted at the age of 26 in August 1862 and served as a private in Company G., 93rd Ohio Infantry. He was married to Emma A. Davis 22 Apr. 1886 in Madison Co., IN. He was living in Baxter Springs as early as 1904.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 30, 1935

Joins Wife. - Bun Branham dies day following the funeral of Mrs. Branham. - He had been in ill health for several years.

Effected no doubt by the shock of the death of his wife, Bun Branham an old Union City boy crossed the great divide on Saturday Sept. 28, , the day following the funeral of Mrs. Bun Branham whose death was told about in this paper. Bun Branham had been in ill health for several years and the end came for him Saturday night at 7 o'clock.

Bun Branham was the son of Chas. and Lydia (Coats) Branham and he was born in Union City about 65 years ago.

He attended school here and he was married to Miss Rilla Cassell, June 20, 1898. At that time Bun Branham was the efficient clerk in the Branham hotel and nearly two years after their marriage the young couple moved to Nappanee, Ind., where they took charge of the Coppes hotel of which venture they made a fine success. Eventually they sold the hotel and for nine years Mr. and Mrs. Branham managed the Tippecanoe Country Club and here also they were highly successful.

Bun Branham with Mrs. Branham left Union City in 1899 and for the past 36 years they have resided at Nappanee, Ind. where they became social favorites and many friends there will mourn their death. They were also popular here in Union City their native home and friends here will regret to learn of their passing.

Bun Branham is survived by two sisters, Mary {Branham) Palmer, Los Angeles, Calif., and Eva (Branham) Terry, Galesburg, Ill.

The funeral will take place Tuesday in Nappanee and burial in the Nappanee cemetery.

The Cassell brothers of this city who were brother-in-laws of Bun Branham will attend the funeral.

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