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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 1, 1935

Found Dead. - Parents at Lynn had found him asphyxiated in his home. - When they returned after being away all day.

Lynn, Ind. --- Omer Baxter, 15, local carrier for the Muncie Star, was found asphyxiated by gas fumes late Saturday night by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Baxter, when they returned from attending the district seventh and eighth grade basketball tourney at Muncie. He was overcome by fumes from a leaky water heater in the bath room. He was seen about 7:30 o'clock in Lynn and told friends he was going home to take a bath. Coroner Lowell W. Painter said today that he probably died shortly before 9 o'clock.

His father is coach of the Lynn grade school team which won the district tourney. His brother, Frank, was selected as all-tourney forward. He is also survived by his mother and two half-brothers, Kelvin and Oliver.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the West Christian Church here, in charge of the Rev. Earl Lantz, assisted by the Rev. Robert Reed. Burial will be at Fountain Park Cemetery at Winchester.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday April 1, 1935

Aged Woman is Stroke Victum.

Mrs. Smantha L. Johnson, 87 years old, widow of the late William Johnson, Ft. Recovery, died at her late home here after a lingering illness. Death is attributed to aparalytic stroke.

The age woman had been a resident of the neighboring Mercer County town for over 60 years. Five children survive.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, April 3, 1935

Thomas McElvain dies.

Thomas McElvain, 35, died at 11:30 o'clock last night at the home of his mother, Mrs. Anna Platt at Winchester. Besides the mother, he is survived by one brother, Donald, of Richmond. Funeral services will conducted at 10 o'clock Friday morning.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, April 3, 1935

Probation Officer dies at Winchester.

Winchester. --- Miss Minerva Scott, 35, of Keystone, who assumed her duties here Monday of last week as probation officer of Randolph County after her appointment by Judge A. L. Bales, died at the Randolph County Hospital Tuesday at 5:30 a. m. Miss Scott was taken to the hospital only last Friday but had undergone an operation before coming to Winchester. She is survived by a brother, Clarence Scott, of Keystone, who arrived here before her death. The body was taken to the Fraze Mortuary here and later removed to Montpelier. Funeral services and burial will be at Pennville.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 5, 1935

Passes Away. - Jack McMahon dies at his home at Dayton, O. - Was formerly a prominent citizen of Union City.

Jack McMahon of Dayton, Ohio died Thursday April 4 at his home on Allen Street. He was well known here being a resident of Union City for several years, moving from here to Dayton some 25 years ago. Funeral services will be held in Dayton, Monday, April 8 at 8:30 (EST) and the remains will be brought here for burial in St. Marys Catholic Cemetery. Those wishing to view remains can do so at cemetery, expecting to arrive here around 10:30 o'clock (CST). Surviving are five sons: Frank, Edward, Vincent, Maurice and Benedict, and two daughters; Alice and Ruth and 18 grandchildren. His wife preceded him three years this June.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 8, 1935

Died. --- Word has come to this city announcing the death of Monroe Curtis, at his home at Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. He was the husband of Miss Marie Moorman, formerly of Winchester, and leaves a daughter.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, April 10, 1935

Lived Here. - Mrs. Granville Woodbury dies at her home in Indianapolis. - She was the daughter of George Hays and was born here.

Mrs. Wm. H. Mote, Mrs. Stephen Thompson, Mrs. Hazel Barr, Mrs. Clara Warner and Mr. and Mrs. Will Grimes have returned from Indianapolis where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Granville Woodbury.

Mrs. Lauretta C. Woodbury, 80 years old, widow of Granville Woodbury and a resident of Indianapolis more than fifty years, died Saturday morning.

Funeral services will be held at the home of her son, Henry G. Woodbury, 536 North Central court, at 2 o'clock this afternoon. Burial will be in Crown Hill cemetery.

Survivors include, besides the son, a daughter, Mrs. E. A. Hardin; granddaughters, Miss Betty Jane Woodbury of Indianapolis and Mrs. E. B. Gregg, Jr. of Cincinnati, O., and a great grandson, Richard B. Gregg.

Mrs. Woodbury was formerly Miss Retta Hays, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Hays who were among the first settlers in Union City. She was born here and her girlhood was spent here. Many old friends here will regret to learn of her death.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, April 10, 1935

Died. --- Noah Grim, Monday, April 8th, at the residence one mile west of Elroy, Ohio, aged 85 years. Funeral services will be conducted at Teegarden church Wednesday, April 10th, at 2 p. m. (Eastern time) Rev. W. T. Frank officiating. Interment in Teegarden cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 12, 1935

Killed. - Martin Sipe, well known Deerfield man struck by train. - Was driving his car over crossing and was badly mangled.

Martin Sipe, one of the best known residents of the Deerfield, Ind. locality, was instantly killed this morning when a fast Panhandle train struck the automobile in which Sipe was driving.

The accident happened about ten minutes after ten o'clock and Sipe was driving north over the crossing, on his way toward Old Deerfield which is nearly a mile from the railroad crossing.

Probably owing to the steep grade which approaches the railroad tracks at this point, the unfortunate man failed to see the approaching train which was a fast passenger. The automobile was reduced to splinters and parts of it were carried a great distance on the front of the locomotive.

Sipe's body was badly mangled and death must have been instantaneous.

He was just past seventy years of age and was very prominent in farm circles. Union City was one of his regular trading points and he was well and favorable known here, and highly respected by all who knew him.

He was one of largest land owners in the county.

He is survived by the widow, three sons, McClure and Harold, of Saratoga, Lester at home, and one daughter, Mrs. Alva Mangas, residing about one mile north of this city.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 15, 1935

Passed on. - Edward N. Elliott succumbs at the Methodist hospital. - Formerly held important position with the Swift Co. in Chicago.

After making a brave but hopeless fight against the Grim Reaper for more than two months, Edward N. Elliott was forced to bow to the inevitable and he passed on at the Methodist hospital this morning at two o'clock He was taken to the hospital about two months ago and it was hoped that an operation would save his life but it proved of no avail.

Mr. Elliott was born in England, April 12, 1862, and he had therefore just passed his seventy-third birthday. He came to America when quite young with his parents and they first settled in Canada. Later they moved to Chicago where the young man secured a place with Swift & Company. Owing to his superior knowledge in the work required of him, Mr. Elliott soon became a valuable man to that great company. He was made manager of the Libby, McNeal and Libby department which position he held for about thirty years, when he was retired in order that he might enjoy a much needed rest.

He was married to Elizabeth Ann Bynson, of Union City, Ind., and to them one son was born, Edward B., who with the mother, and a son of Mrs. Elliott's by a previous marriage, Henry Warden, survive.

Mr. Elliott and family came to Union City from Chicago about three years ago and they purchased the Thitt home on West Oak street where they reside.

Mr. Elliott was a fine Christian gentleman of the old school, refined and well educated. He was always courteous and friendly and during his residence here made many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

Mr. Elliott was a member of the United Brethren church and he was also a member of the Masonic Lodge.

The funeral will probably be held Wednesday afternoon.

[Funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon with Rev. Ira C. Clark officiating. Interment was made in the Union City cemetery.]

[Excerpts from an Obituary published April 19th. -- He was born in Croydon, England. After the death of his mother and father, Mr. Elliott was by his own choice responsible for the care and upbringing of his three sisters and two brothers. This he did in the spirit of true love and devotion for their welfare. On July 13, 1907 he was united in holy matrimony to Mrs. Anna Warden. To this union were born two sons James who passed away from earth at three years of age and Edward who with his companion survive. He was also survived by two brothers, Ben and Al, of Chicago. The three sisters have preceded him in death.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, April 16, 1935

Died --- Mrs. Walter Anderson today received word from Marion, Ohio, announcing the death Monday of Mrs. L. S. Langley nee Estella Knott. Mrs. Langley was formerly a resident of this city and a graduate of the West Side School[Class of 1900.] The funeral will take place Thursday at 1:30 p. m. at Marion.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, April 16, 1935

Fall Fatal. - Mrs. Greene passes away three months after accident. - She was the mother of Mrs. Leroy Chambers of this city.

Mrs. M. M. Greene, mother of Mrs. LeRoy Chambers passed away this morning at the Chambers home on North Columbia street after a long illness and as the result of a fall of which she was the victim some 13 weeks ago. A week before that time she came for a visit with her daughter, and she fell in coming down the stairway. In the fall she suffered a broken right hip and she was taken to the Union City hospital where she was cared for for eight weeks. About five weeks ago she was removed to her daughter's home. Her condition became worse two weeks ago and though everything possible was done for her, the end came this morning at 2 o'clock.

Mrs. Greene was the daughter of James and Eleanor Miller and she was born in Pike county near Velpen, Ind., Aug. 12, 1857. She spent her girlhood in that locality and graduated from the Velpen school. Her maiden name was Michael Miller.

She was married in 1887 to Thomas B. Greene, who preceded her to the better world Sept. 30, 1912. Three children survive Mrs. Greene, namely Mrs. LeRoy Chambers, Mrs. Y. A. Bently of New York City and Mrs. W. F. Butler of Indianapolis and one step-daughter, Mrs. M. A. Duncan of St. Louis, Mo. Also three grandchildren, three step-grandchildren.

Mrs. Greene was a fine type of the splendid pioneer women who helped to build up this country. She was possessed of a fine Christian character and she lived for her home and her family.

The Times joins the many friends of the family in extending sincere sympathy in their sorrow and loss.

The remains will be taken to Velpen, Ind. Thursday and the funeral will take place Friday morning at 10 o'clock from the Greene family home.

Interment in the cemetery at Velpen.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, April 18, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. R. A. Cookston dies at her home in Harrisville Wednesday. - She had been ill for several months with complications of ailments.

Mrs. Ruby Adelaide Cookston, a well known and highly respected widow woman of Harrisville passed away at her home in that village Wednesday afternoon at 5:45 after an illness covering a period of several months, the cause of her death being senility with complications.

Mrs. Cookston was born in Clinton county, Iowa, April 3, 1854 and she was therefore a few days past 81 years of age at the time of her death. During her last illness and death she was at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jessie Dilley in Harrisville.

She was a good Christian woman and she lived for her family and many friends will mourn her going. She leaves the following children: Mrs. Jessie Dilley, Harrisville; Mrs. Purdie Hines, Elmer and Clifford Cookston of West Liberty, Ohio.

She is also survived by one brother Femer Hunter and two sisters, Mrs. Ella Vandiver and Mrs. Rosa Haverton.

The body was prepared for burial at the Fraze Funeral Home. The funeral will take place Saturday at 2 p. m. (EST) from Mt. Tabor M. E. Church near West Liberty, Ohio. The burial will take place in the Mt. Tabor cemetery. The services will be conducted by Rev. Grant.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, April 18, 1935

Noted sculptor, Greenville native is taken by death.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Mrs. Louise Paulding, Greenville, has gone to Chicago to attend the funeral services for her son, John Paulding, noted sculptor and native of this city, who died Monday night.

A bas-relief in plaster by Mr. Paulding, modeled after the famous painting, "The Doctor," was one of the outstanding art exhibits at the Chicago World Fair.

Funeral services for Mr. Paulding will be held Thursday afternoon and burial will be in Chicago.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 19, 1935

Called Home. - William Willis passes to his last reward. - Was one of Union City's most prominent citizens.

One by one the veterans of the Civil War of our city are passing to their last reward and the latest is that of William Willis, 87, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Grace Geyer at Bloomingport, near Lynn, Ind., Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock, after an extended illness caused by an accident.

He lived practically all his life in this city and was one of our most beloved citizens.

At the out-break of the Civil war, he enlisted in the 194th Ohio Volunteer regiment and under the command of General Hancock saw considerable active service.

He is survived by Mrs. Cora Kenn, of Union City, and Mrs. Emma Simmons, of Whiting, Ind., sisters; and the following children: Mrs. Eva, Wilt, Mrs. Lilly Wilt, Mrs. Anna Zumbrum, and Miss Sadie Willis, all of Union City, and Elmer Willis of Muncie, in addition to Mrs. Geyer.

Funeral services will be conducted at the United Brethren church, Union City, Sunday, April 21st at 2 p. m., Rev. Ira Clark officiating. Interment in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, April 19, 1935

Is Fatal. - Mrs. Warren White fails to recover after operation in Cleveland. - She was formerly Miss Rebecca Schlechty, a Saratoga girl.

Theodore Warren left today for Cleveland, O. where he joined Mrs. Warren who was called to Cleveland by the illness and death of her sister, Mrs. Warren White, who was in hospital in Cleveland and failed to recover after an operation for a gull bladder ailment.

Mrs. White was born at Saratoga in 1898 and she was therefore only 37 years of age at her death. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Schlechty and her maiden name was Rebecca Schlechty. After her marriage to Warren White, the couple moved to Medina, O. , which was the home of herself and family.

Mrs. White grew up to young womanhood in the Saratoga district and attended school there and many friends there will regret to learn of her untimely death.

Mrs. White is survived by the husband and five children and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Schlechty. Also one sister, Mrs. Theodore Warren and four brothers. Many friends here extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved and sorrowing husband and children in the loss of a faithful wife and a noble Christian mother.

The funeral will take place in Medina, O. Saturday.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 22, 1935

Died --- Mary Alice Hines, 3, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Hines, died at the City Hospital Saturday. A week ago she fell into a vessel of boiling water at the home and was seriously scalded. She is survived by her parents, several brothers and sisters. Funeral services will be held at the Christian church this afternoon at 2 p. m., the Rev. C. G. McCallister officiating. Interment in the City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 22, 1935

Plane Crash. - Orlo Bishop, an amateur aviator is killed. - Accident took place at Elwood, Ind. Sunday.

Portland, Ind. --- Orlo Bishop, 35, owner of the Bishop Service Station on North Meridian street, was killed and Glen Burger, 23, was seriously injured about 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon in an airplane crash at the Brigham airport here.

Berger, who is an amateur pilot, had been taking up a few friends in a light monoplane, owned by Fred Bimel of Portland. He had made a trip with Gerald Hupe and then took Bishop for a short ride. He had reached a height of about 1,000 feet and started to land. When he was about 250 feet from the ground, the plane went into a nose dive and fell in the yard in front of the Brigham home. The plane was demolished.

Bishop was instantly killed, his death being caused by a broken neck. His left leg was broken above the ankle and his right hip was broken. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bishop of northeast of Portland, who survive. Other survivors include his wife, one brother, Dean Bishop of Portland and a sister, Ethel, of northeast of Portland. His body was taken to the Baird mortuary.

Glen Berger was taken to the Jay County Hospital. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Berger of southeast of Portland. Both legs were broken above and below the knees, both forearms were broken and his jaw was broken. He did not lose consciousness and it is believed he will recover. He said that the machine went out of control. He could give no reason for its failure.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, April 23, 1935

Last Rites. - Set for attorney John M. Hoel for Wednesday. - Injuries received in fall fatal to former Darke County prosecutor.

Greenville, O. --- John M. Hoel, 73 years old, former prosecuting attorney of Darke county and one of the oldest, active members of the bar association here, died at 1:15 o'clock Sunday afternoon at Greenville hospital. His death is attributed to the effects of a broken hip received in a fall downtown last Thursday. Pneumonia developed Saturday.

Mr. Hoel was a graduate of the University of Michigan, having been engaged in legal practice in Darke county for the last 46 years. He had been identified prominently with both the Darke and Ohio State Bar associations during his career.

His schooling was finished in 1889, during which year he opened an office at Versailles. He practiced there for 11 years, moving to Greenville in 1898

During his early life Mr. Hoel, an ardent Republican, was also very active in politics. His efforts were climaxed in 1921 when he took office as Darke county prosecutor.

As early as 1930, failing health ended his political career, but up until his final, brief illness, he maintained an active interest in both legal and political affairs.

During the last five years he had made his home with a son, Howard, at 214 West Main street, Greenville.

Funeral services will be conducted from the son's residence at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday, with Rev. Ralph Jennings, pastor of the Greenville Presbyterian church, officiating. Interment will be made in the cemetery here.

The survivors include another son, Paul Hoel, Detroit, Mich.; one grandson, William, student at Miami University, and two sisters, Mrs. Sarah Ferguson, Chicago, Ill., and Lillian Hoel, Dayton.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that John McClelland Hoel was born Jan. 28, 1862 at Versailles, Darke Co., OH, the son of William Hoel and Sarah Ann Long, both b. Wayne Twp, Darke Co., OH. He was widowed.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, April 25, 1935

Succumbs. - To injuries received in auto crash does farmer. - Noah Shank dies in Greenville Hospital last night.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Noah Shank, 49, a farmer living at Potsdam, in Miami County, died at 10:10 o'clock last night in the Greenville Hospital of a skull fracture and crushed chest, sustained in an auto accident at 4:50 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at a road intersection two miles east of Pitsburg.

Shank's wife, Georgia, 47 years old , riding in the same car suffered cuts and bruises about the face and head but was not seriously injured. Sylvester Ditmer, 19 years old, living in the vicinity of Pitsburg, the driver of the other car involved in the mishap was unhurt. Both automobiles were considerably damaged in the crash.

In addition to the widow, survivors of Shank are a son, Harris, of Fort Wayne, and a daughter, Mary Esther at home. Mr. and Mrs. Shank were en route to Potsdam from Pitsburg when the accident occurred.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 29, 1935

Died --- Mrs. Ora Logan at the residence in Hillgrove, Ohio Monday, April 29th, aged 50 years. The body will be returned to the home from the Brooks funeral home, Monday evening where funeral services will be conducted Thursday at 2 p. m. (Eastern Standard Time). Interment in Greenville, O. cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, April 29, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Rebecca Ward dies suddenly Sunday afternoon. - Had lived practically all her life in Union City.

The death of Mrs. Rebecca Ann Ward, which took place Sunday afternoon, has cast a gloom over our city, as she was a true Christian woman and had a host of friends in the city, where she had spent the major portion of her life, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Thomas Tobin.

She is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Thomas Tobin and Mrs. S. E. Harnish and a brother Warren Bailey of Ansonia, Ohio.

She took an active part in the affairs of the Christian church.

The funeral will take place Wednesday afternoon from the Christian Church at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. C. G. McCallister. Interment in the Teegarden cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, May 1, 1935

Lived Here. - Mrs. Lena (Williams) Avery dies at her home in Sinatee, N. H. - She attended school here and was a member of the U. C. O. class of 1888.

Mrs. I. J. Lorton, of Rural Route 1, received the sad intelligence today of the death of Mrs. Lena Williams Avery, who passed away at her home in Sinatee, N. H., after a long illness. Her death occurred April 28, and the funeral and burial took place today. She is survived by the husband and three children.

Mrs. Avery, who was born in Union City, and her parents were John and Hannah Williams, both of whom have preceded her to the land over there. Mrs. Avery, formerly Miss Lena Williams attended school on the East Side, and she was a popular member of the class which graduated in 1888. She was a fine type of American womanhood and many old friends here will regret to learn of her death, and they extend sincere sympathy to the stricken husband and children in their sorrow and loss..

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 6, 1935

Died - Bert Isenbarger, 68, a prominent farmer, living near Lynn, Ind., died Sunday.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, May 7, 1935

Dies in Lima. - Lloyd LeFevre passes out very suddenly late Tuesday afternoon. - Born and reared in Union City and brother of Romney Lefevre.

Word reached Union City this morning of the death of Lloyd Lefevre which occurred at the home of the deceased in Lima, Ohio, Monday afternoon. The news was telephoned to Romney Lefevre, a brother, by Aaron Bennett, who was visiting in Dayton where Lloyd LeFevre's father, I. Fraze LeFevre, residence. No details other than that he died very suddenly have reached here.

C. Lloyd LeFevre was born in Union City, Oct. 6, 1887, and he was therefore forty-seven years of age at death. He attended school here and when still a lad learned the barbering trade with his brother, Romney LeFevre. Later he also worked in the George Keltner barber shop.

He soon became dissatisfied with the barber trade as a vocation and resigned his job to accept a position as a shoe clerk in a large store in Springfield, O., and he followed this business for the rest of his life. After two years in Springfield, he went to Dayton where he held a responsible position as shoe clerk for five or six years. He left Union City twenty-five or thirty years ago.

From Dayton he went to Lima, O., where he secured a place. He enlisted in the world war and all during that engagement was stationed at Newport News, where he served.

After the war he returned to Lima, O., where he was married to Miss Grace Huntley, daughter of Dr. and Miss Huntley and the groom went into the shoe business for himself. He had developed into a splendid business man and being always honest and upright and having a very pleasing personality, he with the assistance of his wife, made a fine success of the business.

Lloyd was a very popular young man while he resided in Union City, and when he departed from the city of his nativity he left behind many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved widow and other relatives.

Besides the widow and one adopted daughter, he is survived by his father I. F. Lefevre, three brothers, Romney, Glen LeFevre, of Dayton, and Frank LeFevre, of California; one sister, Mrs. Ruth Breiden, of Dayton, and a number of nephews and nieces. The funeral and burial will take place in Lima, Ohio Wednesday.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 10, 1935

Mrs. Art Snider's mother dies.

Mrs. Elizabeth Voll, aged 75 years, mother of Mrs. Art Snider, died Wednesday evening at 9:30 o'clock at her home in Circleville, Ohio, after an illness of 10 days. She was preceded in death by her husband, Mr. Bert Voll, a little over a year ago. She leaves to mourn her the following children: Mrs. T. J. Krinn, Mrs. J. C. Rader, Mr. Elliott Voll and Mr. Albert Voll of Circleville, Ohio; Mr. Christy Voll of Toledo, O.; Mr. William Voll, of Marietta, O.; and Mrs. Art Snider, this city. She was born in Circleville, Ohio, and has lived there all her life. Funeral will take place tomorrow, Saturday morning at 8:30 o'clock in St. Mary's Church, Circleville.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 13, 1935

Died. --- Mrs. Violet Dakota Heckman at the residence, 909 North Plum Street, Sunday, May 12th, aged 71 years. The body was taken to the Brooks Funeral Home where funeral services will be conducted Tuesday, May 14th, at 2 p. m., Rev. Earl Lantz officiating. Friends are invited to call at the funeral home at any time. Interment in Brethren Cemetery north of the city.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 13, 1935

Lad Killed. - In an auto accident near Portland, Ind. - Driver turns into ditch, sideswipes Max Roll.

Portland, Ind. --- Max Roll, 5, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harley Roll, died Saturday night at the Jay County Hospital of injuries sustained when he was struck by an automobile as he dashed across the state highway 27 in front of his home, five miles north of here. The driver, a Toledo, O. man, turned his car into the ditch, sideswiping the boy.

The boy received a fractured skull, a fracture of the right thigh and internal injuries.

Mr. Roll who was standing on the front porch at the home, witnessed the accident and said he did not blame the driver. The later was not held.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 13, 1935

Died. --- Bert Witters, a well known traveling salesman, while driving the truck for the Keener Co. of Muncie, Ind., Saturday ran into a tree and received injuries from the effects of which he died. He was a resident of Farmland and well known here. Union City friends extend sympathy to the surviving relatives.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, May 15, 1935

Jack is Dead. - Edward Scanlon, better known as Jack The Wireman is dead. - He had been ill in the Greenville infirmary for months.

"Jack the Wireman," probably the best known man of this entire section, is no more and no more as regularly as the spring birds come with their song will you hear Jack, the Wireman's cheery "Any umbrellas to mend?" At that he didn't have to make his call very often for he was so well known that he secured what work there was without asking for it was usually tendered to him as he came along.

Then also while he was visibly an umbrella mender he was much more than that, in fact, he was what might be called a wire artist and he could produce many clever and useful things from a bit of wire for he was a real genius along the line that gave him his name.

For several years he lived in a tiny shack in the rear of the Wright & Russ filling station where he put in the most of his time, except the periods when he was out on the broad highway.

He was strictly honest and upright which he proved many times when he would borrow a "grub stake" from some kind friend as he started out on his trips. He always returned these loans and he requested when away from home to have his letters to him addressed to Pat A. Sloan.

He became ill last Fall and was taken to the infirmary at Greenville, O. where he passed away late Monday afternoon. His age was reported to be 84 and up to the present time no relatives have come forward to claim the remains and the funeral took place from the infirmary this afternoon.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, May 15, 1935

Proves Fatal. - Henry H. Bales passes away this morning at Union City Hospital. - Had his skull crushed while assisting in moving a house.

Henry H. Bales, 62, passed away at the Union City hospital this morning at 4 o'clock as the result of an accident which he sustained while assisting in moving a building on the S. J. Fisher farm four miles northwest of this city on Wednesday May 8th.

The house was being moved across the road to the Russell Ruff farm, and had slipped from the rollers while his head was under it, fracturing his skull. He was a tenant on the Fisher farm. He was born in Oklahoma, March 8, 1873 and came to this state in later years and was united in marriage to Miss Nellie McCarthey at Ridgeville, Ind. in 1895, and had lived in Randolph county practically all his life. He is survived by the following children: Oliver Bales in the U. S. Navy in California, Donald and Edward Bales of Washington, D. C. and a brother, Frank Bales of Parker, Ind.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral Home, where friends may call. The funeral services will be held at the Funeral Home at 2 p. m. Friday. Interment in the White River cemetery near Winchester, Ind.

[A later article stated the funeral services would be held on Sunday at 2 p. m. at the funeral home instead of on Friday.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, May 15, 1935

Girl Drowns. - Daughter of former Union City resident drowns at North Manchester. - Miss Patsy Shubert falls into river at Mill Dam; rescuer also drowns.

Word was received here by Supt. Theo. Eley of Jackson, Ohio school that the nine year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Schubert was drowned yesterday at North Manchester, Ind.

Mrs. Schubert was formerly Miss Ino Gottshall and for a time lived on North State Line Road. She is a very close friend of Mr. and Mrs. Eley and she also has many other friends and relatives in this community who will regret to learn of her daughter Patsy's misfortune.

Patsy, it seems, was playing near an old mill dam at Liberty Mill near North Manchester and fell in. A fisherman tried to rescued her and he also lost his life. Patsy's body had not been recovered at last hearing.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, May 16, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Ethel Ginn passed away at five o'clock this morning. - She became ill Friday and underwent an operation at the hospital.

Mrs. Ethel Ginn passed away this morning following an operation which she underwent at the Union City hospital last Friday. She had never been in robust health and was more or less of an invalid nearly all of her life. Her condition became serious last Friday and she closed her eyes in the sleep that knows no awakening this Thursday morning at five minutes past five o'clock.

Mrs. Ethel Ginn was formerly Miss Ethel Moffett and she was born at Woodsfield, Ohio July 22, 1883 and she was therefore 51 years of age. She was the daughter of John and Mary E. Moffett and the family moved to Union City in 1900.

Mr. Moffett, who was in the butter tub factory business and also created what is now known as the Tibbetts drug store, died in 1906.

Ethel attended school here and when she arrived at young womanhood she was married in November of 1906 to Mr. Hubert Ginn. Two children were born to this union, Betty and Edwin. The latter is a member of this year's graduating class and both children make their home with grandmother Moffett, 616 West Pearl street, where the mother of the children also resided.

Mrs. Ginn was a true Christian woman of fine character and a devout member of the Methodist Church, also, when her health permitted she was an active member of the Missionary society, the Ladies Aid Society and was a regular attendant at the Sunday school. She was also a member of the Sally Ann Sewing Club.

She was of a modest, quiet, friendly disposition, so that she was beloved by all who knew her for her many good qualities and she will be mourned by many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the children and other relatives. She is survived by two children, Betty and Edwin, mother, Mrs. Mary E. Moffett and the following sisters and brothers, Mrs. Charles Tritt, Reed Moffett, Earl Moffett, Miss Cordelia Moffett and Miss Mary Moffett.

The remains were removed from the Fraze Funeral home to the Moffett home and the funeral will take place Saturday afternoon.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, May 16, 1935

Long Illness. - Precedes death of Mrs. Mettie M. Mangas which occurred yesterday. - She became serious a few days ago and died Wednesday.

After an illness which covered a period of twenty-five years, Mrs. Mettie M. Mangas passed away at her home on the Lisbon road Wednesday night at fifteen minutes after seven o'clock. Her condition became serious three or four days ago.

Mrs. Mangas was born in Jackson township, Randolph County, Ind., March 25, 1876. She was the daughter of Andrew F. and Alice (Smith) Simmons and she lived practically all of her life in the above township. She attended the Jackson, Ind. school and Dec. 25, 1893 she was married to Charles E. Mangas, who with the following children survive her: Alfie Mangas of Miamisburg, O., and Pauline Mangas. Other relatives who survive her are Mrs. Ella Anders, Mrs. Arta Girton, Rollie Simmons.

Mrs. Mangas was a Christian woman, a good mother and a faithful wife. She was a member of the New Lisbon church, and the Ladies' Aid Society and she was always ready to do more of her share of any good work.

Many friends and the Times extend sympathy to the bereaved family.

The funeral will take place Saturday, May 18, at 2 p. m. from the New Lisbon church. Burial in the New Lisbon cemetery. The services will be conducted by Rev. Justice.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 17, 1935

Answers Call. - Jacob L. Fowler passes away Thursday afternoon at 3:45. - He was one of Union City's oldest and most honored citizens.

Jacob L. Fowler, better known to his friends as "Jake" answered the call of the Grim Reaper Thursday, May 16, 1935, after an illness covering several months tho as a matter of fact he had never been in the same rugged health again after an auto-train accident in which he was injured sixteen years ago. The illness which finally caused his death came on him four months ago and forced him to keep his bed much of the time. The end came at forty-five minutes past three o'clock as stated Thursday.

Jacob Loveland Fowler was born August 28, 1855, and he was therefore 79 years and nine months of age at the time of death. He was the son of Hanson T. and Sarah (Livingood) Fowler and he was born on the old home farm, now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Fowler, one mile south of the city, on the State Line.

He attended the old Parent school and later also the Ohio Side school. He became well educated and for years he held a responsible position with the Deering Binder Co. as collector. He was also bookkeeper for various glass companies. He retired from this active service after his accident sixteen years ago, since which time he has devoted his time to his garden and especially fruit trees for he was one of the foremost authorities on horticulture in this part of the Ohio Valley. He will long be remembered for the luscious fruits which he passed around to his friends. with a generosity that characterized the man.

He was an exceedingly well read man, and he was one of the best posted men on current events in the city.

He was among the first generation of white children born in this section, and at a time when Indiana and Ohio were still almost a wilderness.

His work and example helped much to build up the community in which he lived and wrought.

Jacob L. Fowler was married thirty-nine years ago [March 30, 1896] to Miss Anna G. Barkley of Yellow Springs, O., who survives him. There were no children.

Mr. Fowler was a life-long member of the Masonic Lodge, and also belonged to the K. of P. lodge during its existence in Union City.

"Jake" Fowler was a good man in the best sense of the term. He was friendly and helpful and many friends will long remember him and mourn his death.

Besides the widow, Mr. Fowler is survived by one brother, W. W. Fowler, the well known veteran attorney and two half brothers , Edward Fowler, and Frank Fowler, a prominent attorney of Preston, Minn.

One brother, Hezekiah, died Oct. 16, 1904. There are also four nieces and one nephew, Hanson Fowler, of Columbus, O.

The funeral services will take place from the Fraze Funeral home Sunday afternoon at 3:30. The religious part of the service will be conducted by Rev. Ira Clark of the United Brethren church and for the Lodge services the local Masonic Lodge will have charge. Burial in the Union City cemetery.

[An expanded obituary tribute was published on May 20th.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 17, 1935

Nurse Called. - Miss Florence Lesher dies after only a few hours illness. - She was the daughter of Mrs. George Ripp and graduate of Jackson, Ind.

One of the saddest deaths it has been our duty to record occurred last night at the Ball Hospital in Muncie, Ind., when Miss Florence Lesher, the well known trained nursed answered her last call, after only a few hours illness, the cause of her demise being an acute attack of spinal meningitis of a very virulent nature. She was rushed to the hospital but in spite of all that could be done at that great institution, equipped with all that is known to medical science , at midnight last night the young woman entered on her last long sleep.

Florence Lesher was born in Green township, Randolph County near Ridgeville, Ind., March 19, 1904, and her parents were Mr. and Mrs. Fred Lesher. After the death of her father, her mother was married to Mr. George Ripp and from thence on Miss Florence, with her sisters and mother enjoyed the pleasant Ripp home, five miles north of this city. She attended the Jackson, I. school and was one of its most popular and well liked students. During her school life she also studied the violin on which instrument she became quite proficient and could have made a success as a concert player or as a director of school music. She was made first violinist and director of the Jackson I. high school orchestra, which under her leadership enjoyed a fine success.

However, she chose as her life work to become a trained nurse and after her graduation from the Ball hospital in Muncie, she became one of the foremost nurses of her district.

She was a young woman of charming personality and to know her was a rare privilege. Naturally then she had a host of friends and here in Union City where she was known and loved by many the news of her untimely death came as a great shock. The Times wishes to join the friends in offering heartfelt sympathy to the sorrow stricken family in their great sorrow and irreparable loss.

She is survived by the parents and three sisters, Dorothy, Betty and Miss Mary Lesher, of the Dr. Phipps office. The remains will be brought to the family home from where the funeral will take place Sunday at 11 a. m. Burial in the Union City cemetery. The funeral will be private.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 17, 1935

Died. --- Herbert D. Mikesell, at the residence three miles northwest of the city about noon, Thursday, May 16th, aged 66 years. The cause of death was a heart attack. He was a life long resident of this section. The body will be returned to the home from the Brooks funeral home Friday p. m. Funeral services will be conducted Saturday, May 18th, at 10:30 a. m. at the Union City Church of the Brethren. Rev. R. N. Leatherman officiating. Interment in the Brethren cemetery north of the city.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 20, 1935

Life's Work. - Of Iuka (Negley) Bradford comes to an end. - Well known in Union City and former teacher here.

Sunday's Dayton News carried the announcement of Mrs. Iuka Bradford, aged 71, wife of S. E. Bradford, whose death occurred Saturday afternoon at 6 o'clock at her home on the Wilmington pike. Mrs. Bradford, known to Union City people as Duke Negley, was born in Union City, Ohio, and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Negley. She was a graduate of the Union City, Ohio, school and was a teacher in the schools here for several years. She was a member of the G. G. G. society and was present at the anniversary party three years ago, being the guest of Mrs. Elsie Hission at that time. She was very popular here as a girl and her many friends will regret to learn of her death.

She has resided in Dayton since her marriage to Mr. Bradford, 21 years ago. She is survived by her husband and a sister, Mrs. Elmer Andrus of Chicago. The funeral will probably occur in the family home in Dayton.

[Funeral services were conducted on the 21st at the residence. Interment took place at the Woodlawn cemetery in Dayton, Ohio.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 20, 1935

Joins Wife. - Dr. Sam D. Smith loses his brave fight for life. - The funeral services held this morning from the home.

The funeral services for Dr. Sam D. Smith were held this morning from the home, 606 North Howard street, and Many were present to pay a last tribute to one whom they had loved and admired in life.

Dr. Smith first became ill a year ago, and at that time was taken to an Indianapolis hospital for treatment. After some weeks he was removed to his home where he had been confined ever since. He might have won through but the death of his beloved wife, Mrs. Belle (Murphy) Smith, which occurred Nov. 7, 1934, was a shock from which he never fully recovered. Though he put up a brave fight, the end came Friday May 17, 1935, at ten minutes past 2 o'clock in the afternoon.

Samuel D. Smith was born on a farm not far from Union City and he was the son of William and Katharine (Conklin) Smith. He left the farm when a very young man and studied dentistry in which profession he became one of the leading practitioners in this part of our two states. For some years he was a traveling dentist and thus became well and favorably known throughout the country. He settled permanently in Union City over 30 years ago and soon built up a lucrative practice. He was not only a leader in his profession but a man of absolute honesty so that he gained the confidence of all who knew him. He was also a man of fine social qualities, with a pleasant personality which gained for him a large circle of friends.

He was a member of the Country Club and when in good health played much golf being one of the few members who had a hole in one to his credit.

He was also a member of the Elks and Modern Woodmen and was affiliated with the Methodist Church.

He was public spirited and was intensely interested in the welfare and growth of his home city, and could always be depended on to do more than his share. He helped to build up Union City and he will be greatly missed and sincerely mourned.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier of the Methodist Church, and in his sermon he paid an eloquent tribute to the life and work of the departed. By special request he read the grand poem, "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere."

During nearly all of his illness Dr. Smith was tenderly cared for and attended by his niece, Mrs. Ada M. Barrett, who was with him since his illness began. She was assisted by Dr. Smith's sister, Mrs. Ora Turner, of Wayne.

Dr. Smith is survived by three brothers, William R. and Charles A. Smith, of near this city, Harry S. Smith of Muncie, and three sisters, Mrs. Orr Turner of Wayne, Mrs. Elizabeth Stoneman of near Winchester and Mrs. Etta Kelly of Indianapolis. There are also a number of nephews and nieces

Among those from a distance to attend the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. Dean Barrett and daughter, Jeanne of Knightstown, Ind., Arch Kelly of Indianapolis, Earl Burkett and family and Glen Shaw of Dayton.

Interment was in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 20, 1935

Died. --- Clarence O. Benner, 61, passed away at the Union City hospital, Sunday, May 19, 1935, after an illness of several weeks. He was a life long resident of this city and during his younger life was an outstanding athlete and served on the police force.

He was the son of the late David and Sarah Benner and is survived by one brother, Harry. The body was removed to the Fraze Funeral Home, where friends may call. Funeral services will be held at the Funeral Home, Wednesday at 9 a. m. conducted by Rev. Father M. Shea. Interment in the City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, May 20, 1935

Died. --- Mrs. Cordelia Poffenbarger, 66, widow of Albert E. Poffenbarger, died at her home at 10:35 o'clock Saturday morning following an illness of one year. She was a member of the Christian Church. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Stanley Tipple, of this city; one son, Leland Poffenbarger, of this city, and one step-son, Frank Poffenbarger, of Muncie. Funeral services will be held at the Christian Church this (Monday) afternoon with the Rev. J. A. Watson and the Rev. C. G. McCallister officiating. Interment will be in the City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 31, 1935

Passed on. - Ira Kreider, a well known business man died this morning. - Came to Union City from Dayton about ten years ago.

Ira Kreider, a well known business man of Union City, passed away this morning after two weeks of illness. He was removed to the Union City hospital, where he received every care and attention, but to no avail and he passed away at forty minutes after four o'clock.

Ira C. Kreider first saw the light of day near Greenville, O., Dec. 13, 1878. He attended school in that district and Aug. 3, 1924, he was married to Miss Pearl Hardwich, of Palestine, O., by Rev. Hoeffer.

He moved to Union City from Dayton in 1925, and started a radiator repair shop. Two years later, he enlarged his building, 224 South street and established a grocery. He seems to have filled a long-felt want in that neighborhood. Through fair dealing he soon built up a fine business.

He was thoroughly honest and a man of good character, and in religion he was an old-style Dunkard.

He leaves one son, Arthur Kreider, of Dayton, O., and one step-daughter, Mrs. Herman Haga, of Detroit, Mich.

He is also survived by three brothers, Willis and David Kreider of near Arcanum, and Jess Kreider of Painter Creek, Darke County. Five sisters, Mrs. Alma Strand, Woodington; Mrs. Alice Weaver, Saskatchawan, Can.; Miss Sarah Kreider, Mrs. Altha Shuff of Painter Creek, and the father, David Kreider, of Greenville.

The funeral will take place from the Fraze Funeral home Sunday at 2 p. m.

[He was the son of David Kreider and Nancy Stauffer. Rev. Leatherman officiated at the funeral service. Interment was made in the City Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 31, 1935

Funeral Notice. --- Mrs. Orie Kumler, 82 years old, passed to her reward Thursday. Funeral services will be held at the Waterhouse U. B. Church, Saturday at 3 p. m. Interment will be made in Teegarden Cemetery.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home Records, Ansonia, Ohio gives her name as Amanda C. Kumler, b. July 19, 1852 in Butler Co., OH, the daughter of John Brosier and Martha Heitsman, both also born in Butler Co., OH.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, May 31, 1935

Last Roll Call. - William Kerr joins silent majority after long and useful life. - He was one of the builders of Union City and came here in 1866.

William Kerr closed his eyes in his last long peaceful sleep this morning at 40 minutes past 3 o'clock after an illness which covered a period of about five weeks. Up to that time he retained his faculties to a remarkable degree considering that he was past 90 years old and mingled with friends and associates up town almost daily. His last trip up town was on Sunday April 22. Shortly after that he took his bed and it was the beginning of the end. The sands of life gradually ran out and he passed quietly and peacefully as stated this morning.

William Kerr was born in Bedford, Pa., Feb. 25, 1843 and he was therefore a little over 92 years of age at death. He was the son of Thomas and Susan Kerr and when William was a mere lad the family moved from Bedford, Pa. to Hagerstown, Ind. Later they moved to Greensfork and Richmond and in 1866 from Richmond to Union City which became the family's permanent home.

William at this time was 22 years of age. That early in life he began the splendid business career which was to place him at the very head of Union City's business affairs. He began to learn the tinners trade and hardware business in Pope's stove store and he had back of him at that early age an honorable record as a soldier who offered his all for his country enlisting when 19 years old in an Indiana regiment which he joined in Washington, now known as Greensfork in Wayne county. He was honorably discharged at Murfreesboro, Tenn., and returned to Union City.

He bought the Henry Beachler Hardware store and became associated with his brothers in the hardware business which grew to be one of the foremost of its kind in eastern Indiana and western Ohio.

He was married Sept. 3, 1872 to Miss Mary Grindle, at Centerville, Ind. The following children were born to this union, all living but Ollie Kerr, youngest member of the family who died when only 16.

The children surviving are Frank Kerr, Santiago, Calif., Harry Kerr, Cincinnati, O., Walter Kerr, Elmer Kerr, Miss Margaret Kerr and Miss Susan Kerr, all residing in Union City.

The faithful wife and mother passed to her reward many years ago.

Wm. Kerr never held public office but he could have done so had he desired, for he was highly capable of filling any place and few men were better posted on the city's needs and condition. His staunch and sturdy honestness was proverbial and all men trusted him.

For 17 years Wm. Kerr was president of the old Commercial Bank and its success was in a large measure due to his ability and his personality.

He was also a Christian and a devout member of the Presbyterian church. In politics he was a life long Democrat and he was always ready to stand staunchly by his party.

As was said in these columns in the issue of Feb. 25, 1935, one feels that Wm. Kerr's has been a life well lived with devotion to his family as one of his dominant traits and that when the passing came he will leave behind his only memories of kindly deeds and loving service.

While he took life seriously he was always pleasant and companionable in his daily walks of life and so he will be deeply mourned and long remembered by the city and community of which he was an honored and loved member.

Besides the above he is survived by two brothers, Wash and Tom of this city.

The Times wishes to extend sincere sympathy to the surviving members of the family in their hour of sorrow and great loss.

The funeral will take place Monday at 2 p. m. from the residence, corner of Columbia and Division street, conducted by Rev. Forbes Robertson, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. Interment in the City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 3, 1935

One Dead, Three Injured. - Auto accident near Mills Lake takes place Sunday. - Party of colored people in accident when tire blows out.

Winchester, Ind. --- Raymond Burden, 32, colored, Anderson, is dead; his wife, Sarah, 49, seriously injured and their two children, Rosella, 11, and Leonard, 8, suffering from cuts and bruises about the face and body, as the result of an automobile accident nears Mills Lake, one mile east of Farmland, shortly after noon Sunday.

The accident occurred when a right front tire blew out. The car was driven by John Iving, also of Anderson. It left the road sideswiped four trees completely demolishing the car, and finally coming to a stop on the opposite side of the road headed west in the direction from which they came.

Iving and an unidentified colored woman who was also in the car escaped injury.

The Burdens were brought to the Randolph County Hospital in Winchester in the Thornburg ambulance from Farmland. Burden died about two hours later. He suffered from a crushed chest, a right arm almost severed and other injuries.

Mrs. Burden's condition is not thought to be critical although she is suffering from several deep lacerations about the face and body and internal injuries.

The children sustained cuts about the face and other injuries. They were dismissed from the hospital and taken to Ball Memorial Hospital at Muncie where they remained last night with Muncie friends of the family at their bedside. The family home is a 307 West Seventeenth street, Anderson. The body of the father was taken to the Johnson mortuary at Muncie.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 3, 1935

Death Report. --- The funeral of Beldon Eckenrode, 61, who died in Grand Rapids, Mich., took place Saturday afternoon at Winchester, Ind. where interment took place. He was formerly a resident of Union City and a telegraph operator.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, June 5, 1935

Called Away. - Oscar Studebaker dies after several months illness. - He moved to Union City from Ansonia, Ohio, several years ago.

Oscar Studebaker, an old traction line employee in the days when the traction line operated through Union City, died this morning at his home 343 South Columbia street, after an illness covering more that a period of one year. He was taken to the Union City hospital in April of 1934, and again Feb. 20, 1935. He was returned to his home last March . Although everything possible was done for him, he was forced to give up the fight and he passed away at 2:45 this morning.

Oscar R. Studebaker was born near Ansonia, O., where he attended school. He was twice married. The first time to Miss Reigle who died many years ago. Five daughters were born to this union, all living. They are: Mrs. Cora Oakley and Mrs. Estella Slater, of Madison, Ind.; Mrs. Minnie McCurry, of Windfall, Ind.; Mrs. Donna Yarbrough of Jonesboro, Ind., and one daughter, Pearl, resides in Louisiana.

After the death of the first Mrs. Studebaker, the widower was married to Miss Teeter, who with one son, Benton Studebaker, of the Imperial Electric Co., survive. Also one stepson, Carl Cummings, of Dayton, O.

Mr. Studebaker was also an employee of the Big 4 railroad for some years until his health failed. For five years he made his home with his son Benton and wife on Columbia street and several months ago Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Studebaker moved to South State Line street.

Mr. Studebaker was a good citizen and a Christian gentleman and during his residence in this his adopted city he made many friends who will regret to learn of his death, and the Times joins them in extending sympathy to the surviving relatives.

Funeral announcements will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Times.

[Funeral services were held on Friday from the residence of the son, with Rev. C. G. McCallister officiating. Interment in Ansonia Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 11, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Mary E. Thornburg passes away this morning. - Had been ill for several years and a true Christian woman.

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Thornburg, 72, passed away this morning at 7 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Roy Conklin, at 1402 West Pearl street, after an illness of several years.

She was a true Christian woman who was loved by all who knew her. She leaves the following children: Mrs. Roy Conklin of this city, Mrs. Hilda Corle of Portland, Ind. and Claude Thornburg of Bloomingsport, Ind. and one brother Clarence Landers of Benton Harbor, Mich.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral Home, pending the arrival of relatives and completion of funeral arrangements.

[Funeral services were held on Thursday afternoon at the Jericho Church conducted by Rev. Elvan Thornburg. Interment was made in the Jericho Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 17, 1935

Two Killed. - Prominent manufacturer and wife killed in auto south of this city Sunday. - Fred Mellinger and wife were enroute to Lynn when crash took place.

A fatal auto accident took place at the intersection of U. S. Highway No. 36 and Indiana Highway No. 227, south and east of Spartanburg Sunday afternoon about 4:10 o'clock when Frederick W. Mellinger, general manager of Creif Brothers Cooperage Company of Cleveland, O., was killed instantly, and his wife, 46, was fatally injured Sunday as two automobiles collided.

Four Richmond youths were involved in the accident. James Saxton, 16, suffered a possible fracture of the skull. Gilmore Red, 17, driver of the car, William Nusbaum, 16, and Harry Chenoweth, 16, escaped with cuts and bruises. They were taken to Reid Memorial Hospital at Richmond.

Mellinger, thrown from his car by the impact, received a broken neck and a fractured skull. Mrs. Mellinger, with a broken neck, was brought to the Randolph County Hospital at Winchester, Ind., in a passing hearse returning from a funeral. She died about two hours later.

Alva Green, a farmer living at the crossroads, who witnessed the accident, told Dr. Lowell Painter, county coroner, that the car in which the Richmond youths were riding failed to stop at the crossing. Dr. Painter has ordered an investigation of the accident for tomorrow morning.

State police said their check of the marks indicated Mellinger had applied the brakes a considerable distance from the intersection.

Mellinger, general manager of the Creif Cooperage company, Cleveland, and his wife were on their way to Lynn, Ind., to visit friends at the time of the mishap.

Mrs. Mellinger, nee Miller, was a member of a prominent Greenville family. The Mellingers came to Greenville, O., last week and opened up their country home north of Greenville, O., on the Greenville-Union City road for the summer season.

Mr. and Mrs. Mellinger are survived by a son, Benton, 20 years old, who is at the home here. The youth was not with his parents at the time of the fatal crash. Mrs. Mellinger also is survived by a brother, Harry Miller, highway divisional engineer in this district.

The four youths, all residents of Richmond, Ind., were taken to Reid Memorial hospital at Richmond. Attendants at the hospital regarded young Saxton's condition as serious.

[Funeral services for Fred W. Mellinger, 56 years old and his wife, Edna, 53, prominent residents of Cleveland and Greenville, Ohio, was conducted from their summer home west of Greenville, Ohio, Wednesday afternoon. Rev. Ralph Jennings, pastor of the Greenville Presbyterian church officiated. Interment was made in the Greenville cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 17, 1935

Life's Work. - Of Leonard T. Buckingham comes to a close at his home in Richmond, Ind. - Was formerly on the police force in Union City and a prominent citizen.

Leonard Tilson Buckingham, 77, passed away Friday at his home at 115 North Nineteenth street in Richmond, Ind. He was born at Hollansburg, O., July 10, 1868 and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Levi Buchingham.

He moved to Union City and was united in marriage to Miss Victoria Lambert. To this union were born one son, Frank E. Buckingham of Cambridge, Mass. and one daughter, Mrs. Maude B. Maher of Versailles, Ohio.

While in this city, he followed the harness business and served as city police.

In 1906 he moved to Richmond, Ind. and entered the Miller Harness Company where he remained until about three years ago when he retired on account of failing health.

Leonard Buckingham was a popular citizen, a type of man who always had a pleasant smile and word for everyone and was an active member of the I. O. O. F. lodge.

The funeral took place Sunday afternoon at the residence of the deceased in Richmond, Ind., conducted by Rev. C. B. Croxal, pastor of the Central Methodist Episcopal church of Richmond, Ind., of which he was a member.

Interment took place in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 17, 1935

Passes Away. - William D. McEntire dies at his home in this city. - Had been a life long, honored citizen of Union City.

William D. McEntire, 67, passed away at his home on W. Pearl street Sunday morning after an illness of several months as a result of a paralytic stroke.

He was a life long resident of Union City, being born here April 6, 1868 and was one of our most highly respected citizens.

Mr. McEntire was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Davis and to this union were born the following children: Pearl McEntire of Indianapolis, Ind.; C. Leo McEntire of Bellefontaine, O.; Elijah (Clyde) McEntire of Kokomo, Ind.; George (Guy) McEntire of Columbus, O.; Herman McEntire of Janesville, Wis.; and Victor, Vernon, Lois, and Lincoln McEntire of Union City, Ind.

There is one son and daughter deceased.

He attended school on the East Side of this city.

The funeral will take place from the residence of the deceased, 938 W. Pearl street Tuesday afternoon at 1 p. m. conducted by Rev. Ira Clark. Interment in the York Center, Ohio cemetery.

[From Obituary published June 25th. -- William Darius McEntire was the son of Robert and Martha McEntire. He was born April 6, 1868 in Union County, Ohio near Marysville. He was the youngest of ten children and all have preceded him in death but one sister, Mrs. C. M. Wright of Savona, Ohio. He was united in marriage to Addie Davis of York Center, Ohio. To this Union were born 11 children, two of whom are deceased, one daughter, Clara and one son, Clarence. He was survived by his widow, Addie, and the nine sons and one sister named above.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 17, 1935

Died. - The funeral of Eliz. Longfellow was held at the Christian Church in Lynn Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Longfellow was another of our country's oldest citizens. She was well known as a reader, and for her sunny disposition. She was a loyal follower of Christ. Rev. Earl Lantz delivered the sermon. He and Mrs. Lantz sang. Folks from Union City were in attendance.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 20, 1935

Passes Away. - Jesse T. Wheatley dies in Denver, Col. hospital. - Was a member of the Union City Elks Lodge and former express agent.

This afternoon Joseph Ruff, secretary of the local Elks lodge received a telegram from James T. Eagen, secretary of the Denver, Colorado Elks lodge that Jesse T. Wheatley, member of the local Elks lodge and formerly U. S. express agent in this city had passed away in Denver, Colo., and the remains were being shipped to his home in Covington, Ky. for burial.

Mr. Wheatley had been connected with the U. S. Express Co. for a great number of years and while in our city became a member of the Elks lodge. He was taken ill here and underwent an operation and later went to Denver, Colo., in an effort to regain his health.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 20, 1935

Mother - Shot by her son who thought she was a burglar. - Son was horrified when he found he killed her.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Mistaken for a burglar, Mrs. Jennie Sharp, 66, wife of Albert D. Sharp, prosperous farmer residing two miles east of Burkettsville on the Darke-Mercer county line, was shot and killed Wednesday morning at 4 o'clock by her son, Paul, 22. Mrs. Sharp was the mother of 13 children.

Paul was awakened by an unusual noise in the house, he explained to authorities. He said he thought he heard some one crawling downstairs and immediately arose, obtained a .32 calibre revolver, and crept to the first floor.

In the kitchen, where no light had been turned on, Paul saw a moving object. Believing it was that of an intruder he took aim and fired, the bullet striking his mother in the heart and causing instant death.

The youth was overcome with grief when the household was aroused by the sound of the shot and an investigation followed.

The body was sent to the Fisher mortuary at Ansonia and Sheriff Linn Browne and Coroner Raymond Marker will conduct an investigation. The son has not been taken into custody as there seemed no doubt the shooting was accidental.

Three of Mrs. Sharp's children live at home. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Christian Shultz, are living, her father having recently celebrated his 90th birthday.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home Records state that she was born Sept. 28, 1873 in Montgomery Co., OH, the daughter of Christ Shultz and Margaret Omer, both born in Germany. She was the mother of 19 children, 3 deceased and 16 living. Also survived by 40 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. Interment was made on June 22nd in the Holsapple Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 24, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Owen Lally succumbs after a week's illness Sunday morning. - She had been a member of the Rosary society for fifty years.

After a long and useful life, Mrs. Owen Lally closed her eyes in the sleep that knows no awakening, Sunday morning at four o'clock, after an illness of about a week brought on by paralytic stroke, from which she never recovered. She resided with her daughter, Miss Rose, at the Corner of Plum and Division streets.

Mrs. Lally, who was formerly Miss Bridget Fleming, was born in Ireland, February 2, 1849, and she was therefore 86 years of age at the time of her death. She came to America from Ireland when quite a young girl, and she had lived in Union City for many years. Mr. Lally died some years ago.

She was a good Christian woman, a life-long member of the Catholic church and for fifty years was a valued member of the Rosary Society.

She is survived by two sons, John and William Lally and one daughter, Miss Rose Lally.

The body was prepared for burial at the Fraze funeral home and the funeral will take place from St. Mary's church Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock conducted by Rev. Father Michael Shea. Burial in the Catholic cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, June 26, 1935

Greenville, O. policeman kills Alva Barnhart. - Slain man reported to have fired upon trio of officials. - Police called to Alva Barnhart residence to quell disturbance. - Officer Ray Mong kills man after he attempts to shoot Sheriff Browne.

Greenville, Ohio, June 26. --- Alva Barnhart, 56 years old, local blacksmith who had spent practically his entire life here, was instantly killed about 9:30 o'clock last night by a charge from the shotgun of a local police officer, fired after Barnhart allegedly had taken three shots at a group of officers called to his home to quell a disturbance.

Barnhart was said to have been arrested a number of times by Greenville authorities on charges of Liquor Law violations and assault and battery.

Wade Curtis, a neighbor, called police after an attempt to intervene in an altercation between Barnhart and Luella Martin, Barnhart's housekeeper. Curtis told Police Officer Ray Mong, who answered the call that Barnhart had threatened to kill any officer who came to his house. Officer Mong picked up Darke County Sheriff Linn Browne and Deputies Harry Niswonger and Ray wellbaum and the four drove into the lane between Curtis and Barnhart's houses.

The later was lying on the grass, gun in hand, when officers arrived and ordered Sheriff Browne, who stepped from the car to leave. With no further warning he is said to have shot at Browne, missing him, and then to have fired twice at Officer Mong and Deputy Sheriff Niswonger as they got out of the police car. Mong, who had a sawed-off shotgun, then returned the fire once from a distance of about 12 feet. The full charge struck Barnhart in the forepart of the head, killing him instantly. The dead man was unmarried and to the best of police knowledge had no immediate relatives. Coroner R. J. Marker of Versailles was called to make an investigation.

[Funeral services were conducted for Alva Barnhart, 64 years old, on Thursday afternoon from the Stocker Funeral Home. Burial was made in the Greenville Cemetery. It was disclosed that Mrs. Sylvia Stockum, living here, was a daughter of Barnhart. The shooting was ruled as self-defense.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 27, 1935

Passes Away. - Patrick W. Harless dies at his home Thursday afternoon. - Had been a lifelong resident of Union City.

Patrick Wilson Harless, 84, passed away Thursday afternoon at his home 414 South Howard street as a result of heart trouble which he had been afflicted for several years.

He had been a lifelong resident of Union City, being born in Darke county and was a janitor at the South Side school building.

He is survived by his widow, two daughters and one son.

The funeral will take place from the residence Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock conducted by Rev. Earl Lantz. Interment in the City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, June 28, 1935

A Good Man. - Thomas M. Casey called to his father after five months illness. - Served his government 37 years as registered mail clerk.

The death of Thomas M. Casey, which occurred Thursday, June 27, at 15 minutes to the noon hour, caused general sadness and regret and tho his illness covered a period of about five months, his passing was a shock to the community. He became ill February 2 and tho he of course received the splendid care of the loved ones who surrounded him and every attention that medical science could give, he fought a brave though losing fight. His condition became serious two weeks ago and the end came as stated.

Thomas Maurice Casey was the son of John and Mary (Kane) Casey and he was born in Indianapolis Dec. 7, 1859. He came to Union City, O., with his parents when an infant about the year 1860 and his father John Casey worked as a railroad blacksmith in the local Big 4 railroad shops which were located here at that time.

He attended school in Union City, O., and after his school days he went into the railroad shops as a helper to his father.

After about a year he left for Urbana, O., where he learned the boiler trade at which he worked until he was about 22 years of age when he was appointed to the United States mail service and for 37 years he held the responsible position of a registered mail clerk. It would be interesting to know how many millions of dollars passed through his hands during that 37 years of uninterrupted service. He was honorable discharged and placed on the retired list 13 years ago, since which time he has lived a retired life, enjoying the comforts of the fine home which he with his brother and sisters maintained at 646 North Columbia street. His long service was on the run between Pittsburgh and St. Louis.

Thomas Maurice Casey was a big man physically and mentally. He was quiet and unassuming and of a very friendly disposition. He never spoke ill of his fellowman but was always ready and willing to give to others their just dues. He was a real Christian and a life-long member of the Catholic church.

With his long service to the government he brought great credit not only to himself but to the city of his adoption. Many friends will be sorry to learn of his going and he will be long remembered for he was a fine citizen and a good man in all that that term implies.

The Times wishes to join the many friends in extending sincere sympathy to the brother and sisters and surviving relatives in their loss and sorrow.

He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Mary (Casey) Burns, wife of the well known Hartford City attorney at law, W. A. Burns. Also four grandchildren, Julia Ann, Jack, Martha and Bill Casey Burns.

He is also survived by the following brother and sisters: Anna Jane Casey, Mayme Casey, Angela Casey Mackay and John Casey. Two sisters and one brother, John Casey, all of Union City.

One brother and two sisters have preceded him to the better land. William Casey died in April, 1924; Mrs. T. J. Quinn passed away seven years ago and Mrs. Margaret Thompson was called away two years ago.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral home to be prepared for burial and friends may view the body after Friday noon at the late home of the departed.

Funeral from St. Marys Church Monday at 9 a. m. Burial in St. Marys Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, June 28, 1935

Useful Life. - Of Mary J. Dunn comes to a close after several weeks illness. - Had lived all her life in Wayne Township; funeral Sunday.

Mrs. Mary J. Dunn, 72, passed away at her home 1139 West Oak street Thursday morning at 11 o'clock after an illness of several months.

She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David C. Shockney and was born in Wayne township, Randolph county, December 7, 1863.

She was united in marriage to Wm. M. Dunn, in 1880, and lived for a great number of years on a farm, 1 mile south of Union City. To this union were born the following children: Harry Dunn of Saratoga and Mrs. Albert Hart and Mrs. Chas. F. Smith, of this city. She was a true Christian woman and universally loved by all who knew her and has lived in Union City since 1919. Besides her children, she is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Ora and Wes and Lizzie Shockney of this city, Norman Shockney, of Pontiac, Mich., and Taylor Shockney of Bluffton, Ind. besides five grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

In her younger days she attended the old No. 4 school and has been a life-long member of the Lisbon Christian church.

The funeral will take place from the residence Sunday, June 30th, conducted by Rev. J. A. Watson. Interment in the City cemetery.

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