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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 1, 1935

Car crashes at a bridge south of Lynn, Ind., this morning. - Causing the instant death of William Elkins of Winchester, Ind.

This morning about 6 o'clock William Elkins, superintendent of the Overmyer Mould Works at Winchester, Ind., while enroute from Richmond, Ind. to Winchester, Ind., lost control of his car at the bridge south of Lynn, Ind., which struck an abutment and killed him instantly. He leaves two daughters, Misses Evelyn and Aline and was one of Winchester's most prominent citizens.

[The funeral was held Friday afternoon at the First Methodist church, Winchester. Burial location not given.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 1, 1935

Died - Shirley Jean Harrison, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Harrison of Winchester, Ind., Monday, Dec. 31st., aged 10 months, at the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Shugars, 729 North Columbia street. The body was taken to the Brooks Funeral Home where friends may call. Funeral services will be conducted Thursday at 2 p. m. at the Brooks Funeral Home, Rev. C. G. McCallister officiating. Interment in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, January 2, 1935

Diagnosed - Has been the mysterious malady that brought illness and death to family. - Woman's death and children's illness blamed on "Whip Worm" disease.

Greenville, O. --- Laboratory tests, including blood counts, made at the Greenville hospital Saturday, have paved the way for positive diagnosis of the strange disease which struck the family of Emory Beckner, Bradford farmer, two weeks ago, taking the life of his wife, Sarah, and leaving his four children seriously ill.

The blood counts revealed the presence of an unusual "whip worm" infection, technically called trichinosis in the blood streams of each of the victims. The diagnosis was confirmed Monday in tests made by Dr. Walter S. Simpson, Dayton pathologist.

According to Dr. W. W. Bishop, local health commissioner, the peculiar blood stream contamination develops after the victims eat raw or improperly prepared pork. The disease is very uncommon in this locality and only a few outbreaks have been noted in recent years in the United States.

The "whip worm" infection originates in pigs which, even after butchering, continue to be germ carriers. If meat derived from the infected animals is not thoroughly cooked the contamination is transmitted to consumers.

Swelling of the eyes is the first symptom of the infection noted in humans and it spreads rapidly, ultimately affecting all muscle tissues in the body. The swelling of tissues becomes general.

Mrs. Beckner's death last Thursday brought the case to the attention of Darke county health officers and two of the children, Clara, 9 years old, and Goldie May, 7 years old, the most seriously ill, were immediately removed to the Greenville hospital pending laboratory tests.

Over the weekend the other two children, Fannie, 11 years old and John, 8 years old, also were removed to the hospital.

Later it was said that the oldest girl, Fannie, and the boy, were in a critical condition. The other two girls are improving.

There is no definite cure for the unusual malady, but intestinal elimination and symptomatic treatment have produced satisfactory results in the majority of cases noted in medical annals.

It is reported by Dr. Bishop that the mortality rate from the infection is comparatively low.

Dr. John Alley, Greenville, and Dr. J. R. Gildel, Gettysburg, are in charge of the four cases.

Mr. Beckner has developed no symptoms of the peculiar disease and due to the lapse of time since his family was stricken, it is believed he has escaped. However, he still is under observation.

Funeral services for Mrs. Beckner were conducted Saturday with interment in the Mote cemetery, near Pitsburg.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, January 3, 1935

Many friends pay a last tribute to the memory of Zach Woods. - The funeral held Wednesday was largely attended. - Rev. H. A. Barth pays a fine tribute to this "Master Builder."

The funeral rites over the remains of Zach Woods, took place yesterday Jan. 2nd. from the Lutheran Church of which the departed was a member and officer. All day up to the time of the funeral hour, friends called at the Brooks funeral home for a last look on the face of the man they had liked and respected in life.

There were flowers and floral tributes to great profusion, from the many friends who thus said it with flowers.

After a short service at the Brooks funeral home, consisting of a scripture reading and prayer by the Rev. H. A. Barth, the handsome casket was carried to the funeral car, took up the way to the Lutheran church where the regular services were held.; The following were the pall bearers: Earnest Romeiser, George Zicht, Dan Rosenbush, Fred Temme, Herman Veit.

The Lutheran Church was filled to seating capacity by the friends, neighbors and admirers of Zach Woods and the simple but impressive funeral service was conducted by Rev. H. A. Barth who took his text from First Corinthians Chapter 3, 9th to 11th verses, and the speaker's theme was "Take Heed How We Build."

Rev. Barth gave out the interesting information that he talked to Zach Woods the morning after his terrible accident, and that he talked rationally to his pastor, thanking him and saying to him how much he appreciated his visit and words of encouragement.

Rev. Barth's theme was peculiarly fitting and he spoke of the great work that Zach Woods had accomplished as a "master builder," and the many memorials of his work he had left behind in the form of fine buildings all over this section. He then applied this same thought to a splendid way spiritually. "We are building temples to the Lord," the eloquent divine said "and we are God's living temples", "Building for time," he said "is important, but building for eternity is of far greater importance."

We build wisely when we build on Christ and we live hopefully and happily, if as co-laborers together with God for in so doing we are living and building for eternity.

While Rev. Barth paid a splendid tribute to the life and work and character of Zach Woods his message was filled with hope and comfort for the living.

Touching music was furnished by a men's quartet composed of Arthur Schmidt, Wm. Thokey, Dan Rosenbush and Fred Schmidt with Miss Evelyn Thokey who also played the beautiful funeral music. The quartet sang two songs that were favorites of Zach Woods, "There is a Land of Peaceful Rest" and "Nearer My God to Thee."

At the close of the service the casket was again born to the funeral car and the cortege wended its way to our beautiful Union City Cemetery where with a short service the remains of Zach Woods were laid to their last long and peaceful rest. He lived a good and useful life and his memory will long endure.

[The accident referred to in the above account, occurred on Christmas Day 1934. He fell across a revolving circular saw in his workshop behind his house. The saw ripped through his left arm from below his elbow to nearly his shoulder. Three men were working with him in the garage and they quickly applied a tourniquet to stop the bleeding. He was rushed to the hospital but it was necessary to amputate the arm about half-way between the elbow and the shoulder. Mr. Woods was 72 years old and never recovered from the accident and subsequent operation.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, January 4, 1935

Died. - Frank Jordan Folkerth, at the residence in Coletown, Thursday, Jan. 3rd., aged 11 years. The body will be returned to the residence from the Brooks funeral home Friday p. m. Funeral services will be conducted Monday at the Coletown church at 2 p. m. (Eastern Standard time), Rev. W. E. Sanders officiating. Interment in Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 7, 1935

Funeral of Mrs. Charles Adams, Sr., took place Today at New Madison, Ohio. - Deceased was the mother of Charles Adams of this city.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Adams left this morning for New Madison, Ohio, to attend the funeral services of Mrs. Charles Adams, Sr., whose death occurred Saturday. The deceased had been ill for the past seven weeks and news of her death had been daily expected by relatives and friends here where she was very well known. Mrs. Adams was born on a farm at Spring Hill but has lived for the past 30 years at New Madison, Mr. Adams having died nine years ago. She was a sister of P. C. Worth who died here recently and also of I. N. Worth of Indianapolis who is here to attend the funeral. Mrs. Gilbert Adams and children of this city also attended the funeral which took place this afternoon at the U. B. Church in New Madison. Mrs. Adams, Sr., was a most estimable Christian woman and will be greatlymissed in the community where she has lived for so many years.

[Excepts of Obituary published Jan. 16th, - Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of John and Elizabeth Worth was born near Springhill, Darke County, Ohio, October 1, 1856. She died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry Falkner. On Dec. 24, 1874 she was united in marriage to Charles Adams. To this union were born five girls and three boys: John Walter of Morocco, Indiana; Charles W. of Union City, Ind.; Ira N. of Greenville, Ohio, all survive. Three girls, Bertha, Ethel and Jennie preceded her in death. Also, the husband and father passed away September 29, 1925. About the year of 1889 Father and Mother Adams united with the Christian Church at Spring Hill. She leaves to regret her departure two sisters: Mary Jane Adams of Union City, Indiana, and Lydia Ellen Bickel of Ansonia, Ohio; three half-brothers, Isaac N. Worth of Indianapolis, Indiana, Thomas Worth of Union City, Ind., George Worth of Cal.; two daughters, three sons, 14 grandchildren and many other relatives and friends to honor and cherish her sacred memory.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 7, 1935

Joins Husband.- Mrs. Hannah Inscho passes away after several months illness. - She had resided in Union City the past eight years.

Death closed a beautiful Christian life in the passing of Mrs. Hannah Inscho, who died this morning at 12 minutes past midnight after several months illness. Two weeks ago she entered the Union City hospital where she had every care and the best of medical attention, all of which proved of no avail and the end came as stated.

Mrs. Inscho was born in Cardington, O., 78 years ago and she was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell, prominent residents of that city. She attended school at Cardington and when she arrived at young womanhood she was married to R. D. Inscho who preceded her to the land of eternal rest, about ten years ago.

Mr. and Mrs. Inscho moved to San Antonio, Texas, over 50 years ago when Texas was still in the western wilds. Here she bravely helped her young husband to establish a home. After the death of Mr. Inscho and about eight years ago she moved to Union City establishing her residence in the north rooms of the Flora Lambert home, corner of North Howard and Hickory street.

She was a woman of great refinement and splendid Christian character and with her pleasing and cheerful personality made for herself many friends in the city of her adoption. She was a member of the San Antonio Christian Church in which she took an active part while a resident in that city. After coming here to reside she affiliated with the First Presbyterian church of this city, where she was a regular attendant.

She was the sister of Mrs. Charles S. Hook, Sr. of revered memory and visited in Union City on several occasions, before moving here. She was the aunt of James Hook, of North Howard street.

Mrs. Inscho is survived by one brother, Frank R. Maxwell, of Cleveland, O. and one sister, Mrs. John H. Osborn, of Anderson, Ind.

The funeral will take place Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock conducted by Rev. Forbes Robertson.

[A later edition gave her name as Anna M. Inscho. The funeral service was conducted at the Morris funeral home, Union City. Interment was made in the cemetery at Cardington, Ohio.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 8, 1935

Angels beckon. - Brave little Harriette Grimes loses her valiant fight for life. - Passed away this morning at 9 o'clock at Methodist hospital, Indianapolis.

A mantle of sorrow has settled not only over the home, but over the entire city at the sad news that came from Indianapolis this morning where the announcement reached here of the death of brave little Harriette Grimes, daughter of William and Alberta (Mote) Grimes, who answered the call of the beckoning angels at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning Jan. 6, 1935. There is no doubt but that her illness was brought on as the result of an automobile accident of which she was the victim about the middle of December. A week later, just ten days before Christmas, she became ill, and in spite of all that was done for her she grew steadily worse, and she was taken to the Methodist hospital in Indianapolis, where she underwent an operation Thursday, December 27. Then began one of the bravest battles for life ever presented in child life. And through it all she was the bravest and most cheerful of all.

She always met her dear ones and the friends who saw her with a bright smile and when at last hope failed it was with a smile that she turned back toward her angel home from which she came to gladden the home of her dear parents and grandparents for a few short years.

Harriette Anne was born November 17, 1926. As she grew up she was the bright spirit of not only her own home but the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Mote and her grandfather, Dan Grimes, besides the many homes where she was always a welcome visitor. She attended kindergarten school and then our regular schools. She was a brilliant little pupil which was proved by the fact that she had advanced to the third grade before she was eight years old. She was also a member of the primary Sunday school class of the Christian Church and was very much interested in the Sunday school work. Owing to her sunny disposition she was a general favorite with her school and Sunday school. It is no wonder then that sadness has descended over the city at the tragic death of this little girl. While words cannot help at a time like this the Times desires to join the host of friends in expressing heartfelt sorrow to the parents and grandparents in their deep sorrow and irreparable loss.

Funeral announcements will appear later.

[Funeral services were held at the residence, 233 Pearl Street, on Friday, conducted by Rev. A. L. Ward, assisted by Rev. C. G. McAllister and Rev. Earl Lantz. Interment in the Union City Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, January 9, 1935

Passes away. - Mrs. Arla B. Bennett succumbs after several weeks illness. - She had lived in Union City two years; came here from Ansonia.

Mrs. Arla B. Bennett, of 1410 West Oak street, passed away, Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 8, at 2:15 p. m. at the Richmond hospital. She had been ill since Dec. 20, , and she was taken to the hospital in Richmond for treatment.

Mrs. Bennett was born near Coldwater, Ohio, Nov. 2, 1882, and she was the daughter of J. H. and Lucrecia (Johnson) Yaney. She attended the Celina, O., high school, and after completing her school days she was married to Mr.. Bennett, who survives her. She came to Union City with her husband from Ansonia, O., two years ago, and they took charge of the Orchard Inn and filling station. She was the mother of two children, Miss Movine Bennett and Evangeline Bennett, both students in the Cedarville, O., college.

She was a member of the Methodist church, a fine Christian woman, faithful wife and good mother.

During her short residence in Union City she made many friends whom the Times join in extending sympathy to the bereaved husband and daughters.

Besides the above she is survived by her father J. H. Yaney, Coldwater, O., two brothers, Floyd Yaney, Cleveland, O., and Stanley Yaney, of Columbus, O. Also four sisters, Mrs. Nevada Bright, Mrs. Estella Plummer, and Mrs. Velma Adams, all of Celina, O., and Mrs. Mildred Meyers, of Greenville, O.

The funeral announcements will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Times.

[Died. - Mrs. Oria . Bennett, wife of A. L. Bennett, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1935; aged 52 years, 3 months and 6 days. The body will be removed from the Fraze Funeral Home to the residence, 1410 W. Oak Street, Wednesday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at the Bennett home Friday at 10 a. m. , conducted by Rev. a. C. Wischmeier. Interment in the Union City Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, January 10, 1935

Four persons killed as auto stalls on railroad crossing.

Sidney, O. --- Four members of one family were killed this afternoon when a speeding Big Four passenger train struck their stalled automobile at Pemberton, six miles east of here.

The dead were: W. W. Thomas, 81; Elmer Thomas, 48, his son; Mrs. Elmer Thomas, 43; Erma Thomas, 4, their daughter.

The victims lived on a farm near Pemberton.

The train, east bound, was traveling about sixty-five miles an hour.

Three of the bodies were strewn along the right-of-way for 400 feet, while the body of Mrs. Thomas was carried in the wreckage a mile and a quarter before the train could be stopped.

Elmer Thomas had just got out of the stalled machine when the train struck from the other side of the car. The left piston of the locomotive was broken, but it was able to proceed to Bellefontaine. The train does not stop at Pemberton.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, January 11, 1935

Died --- Samuel Allender, father of a local resident, Mrs. Ralph Bailey, passed away at his daughter's home, Mrs. William Ellison, at Rochelle, Ill., Thursday morning. He was widely known in this vicinity. The funeral will be held at Five Points church, west of this city Sunday at 2 p. m. Rev. Harvey Thornburg officiating.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, January 11, 1935

Passes away. - Caleb G. Starbuck, prominent Randolph County farmer is dead. - Served as county commissioner for two terms.

Winchester, Ind. --- Caleb G. Starbuck, 64, prominent farmer, died at 10 o'clock this morning at his home, seven miles southwest of Winchester, following an illness of several weeks. He is survived by his widow and two daughters, Alice, of Winchester, and Velma, at home. Funeral services will be conducted from the Buena Vista Church at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon in charge of the Rev. G. M. Payne. The body will be lie in state at the church from 1 to 2 o'clock. Burial will be at the Buena Vista Cemetery. Mr. Starbuck was a life-long resident of Randolph County. He was elected county commissioner for two terms; he was vice-president of the Eastern Indiana Live Stock Breeders' Association last year, and at the time of his death was a member of the board of directors of this association.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, January 11, 1935

Died. --- Ronald Eugene, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Lowdenslager, Friday, Jan. 11, 1935, at the residence, 122 Cedar St. Funeral services will be held at the residence Friday at 4 p. m. conducted by Rev. Ira Clark. Interment in Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 14, 1935

Heart Attack Fatal to Losantville Man.

Losantville -- Wesley Howell, 84, died of heart disease early Friday morning at his home, one and one-half miles east of Losantville. He had been ill two days. Funeral services were conducted at 10:30 a. m., Sunday at the Modoc United Brethren Church with the Reverend Mr. Schoonover in charge.

Surviving are the widow, a daughter, Mrs. Russell Smith, of Losantville; two sisters, Mrs. Sarah Kendall, of Modoc, and Mrs. Arminta Driscoll, of Muncie, and three grandchildren.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 14, 1935

Child's death is caused by a strange blood disease. - Trichinosis claims second victim in Beckner family in Darke County.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Funeral services for Clara Beckner, 9 year old daughter of Emory Beckner, Bradford, rural route, who died at the Greenville Hospital late Thursday evening from a strange blood stream infection, know as trichinosis, were conducted from the Miller Grove Church at 2 p. m. Sunday. Interment was made in the Mote Cemetery near Pitsburg.

Another sister, Goldie May, seven years old, is critically ill at the hospital from the same disease, and her life is despaired of.

The Beckner family was stricken with the strange malady four weeks ago and Mrs. Beckner, the mother, died Dec. 27. Mr. Beckner was not affected.

Following the death of Mrs. Beckner, pathological tests and blood counts were made which disclosed she had been the victim of a "whip worm" infection contracted by eating raw or improperly prepared pork. The infection is common to swine and can be transmitted after infected animals have been butchered. The meat must be thoroughly cooked to kill the germ.

According to medical annals, illness is no sure cure for the disease. Following the death of Mrs. Beckner, the children were removed to the Greenville Hospital, including the eldest daughter, Fannie, 12 years old, and John, eight. Their condition was not serious and they were removed to their home several days after receiving treatments.

According to Roy Kester, Darke County Health and Sanitation Inspector, new laboratory tests are being made at Dayton and a post mortem examination of the dead girl's body is planned, providing the consent of the father is obtained.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 15, 1935

Life's career of Wm. H. Thora comes to an end at his home at Dawn, Ohio. - He was well known in Union City and leaves several children.

William H. Thora, 81, passed away at his home in Dawn, Ohio, Monday afternoon at 3:30 p. m. He had been ill with pneumonia for several days which hastened his death after a ten months' illness.

He was the son of Wm. Thora and was born August 18, 1858. His wife preceded him in death last summer. He was a man, who was universally loved and respected in his community and a life-long member of the Catholic church.

The following children survive: Mrs. B. J. Kerfoot, Cleveland, Ohio; Mrs. Blanche (Binkley) O'Dell, Mrs. Pareppa O'Dell, Mrs. Meyers, Union City; Mrs. Walter Harless, Waterloo, Ind.; Miss Nellie Thora, of Dawn.

The funeral will take place from the Frenchtown Catholic church, conducted by Father O'Leary, Thursday at 8:30 o'clock (EST). Interment in the Brock cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 15, 1935

Found dead. - Retired farmer dies suddenly a mile from his home. - Body, only partly clad, discovered beside fence by searchers.

Versailles, O. --- Frank M. Gasson, 75 years old, retired farmer living four miles, northwest of here, was found dead at 1 o'clock Sunday afternoon about a mile north of his home by a searching party. The body, clad only in underwear and a shirt, was found lying beside a fence.

Gasson had been failing mentally the last two years and was in the habit of wandering away without letting his wife, Anna, know where he was going. His wife told authorities that she heard a noise about one o'clock in the morning while she was in bed, but didn't investigate until 4 o'clock.

She went to her husband's bedroom and, finding his bed unoccupied, called neighbors and a search began.

After police were informed, later searching parties began going over the surrounding territory.

Coroner Raymond Marker issued a verdict of death by exposure because the body was partly frozen. The fence by which the body was found was a barbed wire and Gasson's hands and underwear were scratched and torn.

It is the coroner's belief that Gasson tried to climb the fence and after his unsuccessful attempts he became exhausted and fell.

Besides his wife he is survived by two sons, John and Edward Gasson, of Versailles. John is the owner of the Gasson poultry farm, one of the largest in Ohio.

Funeral services will be held at 8:30 o'clock Wednesday morning at the Frenchtown Catholic church, Rev. Father O'Leary will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, January 17, 1935

Dies at her home in Waveland, Ind.

News was received Friday by Mrs. Joe Bushaw, informing her of the death of Mrs. Frank Gardner, who died at her home at Waveland, Ind. The Garners resided in Union City for several years before moving to Waveland, about three years ago.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 21, 1935

Died --- Norma Jean Moody, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Moody at the residence 3 1/2 miles east of the city, Sunday Jan. 20th, aged 1 month, 16 days. The body will be returned to the residence from the Brooks funeral home Monday evening.

Funeral services will be conducted at the home Tuesday at 2 p. m. (C.S.T.) Interment in Teegarden cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 21, 1935

Died --- John Gray, at the residence 7 1/2 miles south of the city Saturday Jan. 19th. Aged 90 years, 11 months and one day. The body was removed to the home from the Brooks funeral home Saturday afternoon. Funeral services will be conducted Monday at 2 p. m. (C.S.T.) at Nashville, O. Church, Rev. Wilbur P. Thorne of Alexandria, Ind. officiating. Interment in Nashville cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 22, 1935

Youth killed. - Auto accident near Greenville, O. Sunday. - Paul Armstrong of Versailles, O. suffers a crushed skull.

Greenville, O. --- A Darke count boy was killed and three companions escaped injury when the automobile in which they were riding overturned in the old Versailles pike late Sunday afternoon.

Paul Armstrong, 20 years old, died at 5:30 o'clock in the afternoon of a broken jaw and crushed skull at the city hospital, where he was taken after the mishap.

In the car with Armstrong were Owen Kissinger, Robert Mumaw and John Berges. Beyond minor bruises they were unhurt.

Armstrong the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Armstrong, rural route, 2, Versailles, with three companions was returning to his home from Greenville at the time of the accident.

On a curve in state route 21, a mile northeast of Greenville, the automobile, which Armstrong was driving, skidded into the ditch, hit a telephone pole and overturned, pinning Armstrong underneath.

Sheriff Linn Browne and Coroner R. J. Marker investigated.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 28, 1935

J. A. Larsh notified of his sister's death.

James A. Larsh of this city Saturday received a message from H. L. Storey, director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., announcing the death of Mrs. Eliza B. Blackford in that city and that the funeral would take place in Boston. The deceased is a sister of Mr. Larsh and was 88 years of age. For 30 years she was in charge of an art exhibit in the Boston Museum and for the past seven years has been on a pension from that institution. Mr. Larsh who is 82 years of age will be unable to attend the funeral.

[A later article stated that the body was being shipped back to Eaton, Ohio for burial. The funeral took place on Wednesday, January 30th. Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Larsh did attend the services.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, January 28, 1935

On the road. - Richmond girl was killed by an automobile. - Hit-run driver sought in death of Beulah Wood on Middleboro Pike.

Richmond, Ind. --- Miss Beulah Wood, 15, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wood, was killed by a hit-and-run driver on the Middleboro pike, one and one-half miles north of here, about 1 o'clock this morning. Her body was found at 5 a. m. by Russell Stevens, proprietor of an inn, and Cecil Nichols and Henry James.

Companions of the girl said she left them shortly before 1 o'clock near her home on the New Paris pike to return to an inn where they had been earlier in the evening. This was the last time she was seen alive.

Her body was lying on the roadside and the rim and glass of a automobile headlight was found near by. Sheriff Harry Thornburgh said there were no indications the girl had been murdered. Besides her parents, five brothers and one sister survive.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 29, 1935

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Shierling drove to Saratoga yesterday to attend the funeral of their uncle T. M. Thums, 82, who passed away at the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. Ervin Birum in Winchester. Mr. Thums was a well known hotel man who at one time owned and operated hotels in Akron and Cincinnati, O. and Elwood, Ind. The interment takes place at Akron today.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 29, 1935

Union City man. - Fred Strauss, formerly Union City Carriage foreman dies. - He passed away at his home in Springfield, Ohio.

The belated word has reached this city of the death in Springfield, Ohio, of Frederick Strauss, who passed away at his home in that city several weeks ago.

He is survived by the widow who was formerly Miss Jennie Brown, and several children.

Fred Strauss was a native of Union City, who attended school here, and when still a very young man he secured a job in the Union City Carriage Works in the trimming department. Later he with Cal Swisher, took charge of the trimming contract which they handled with success for some years.

Some twenty-five years ago, both Mr. Strauss and Mr. Swisher moved to Springfield, O., where they were employed in a carriage factory.

Fred Strauss was a good citizen and a fine fellow.

Many friends here will regret to learn of his passing and they with the Times extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved wife and family.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, January 29, 1935

Died --- Mary Louise Patterson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Patterson, died Monday evening. There will be a service by Father Shea at the Fraze Funeral home, Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock (CST). Interment in St. Mary's Catholic cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, January 30, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Catherine Rex, passes away at her home. - Had been a life long resident of Union City and true Christian woman.

Mrs. Catherine Rex, passed away at her home at 311 East Main street, Monday night at 9:15 o'clock after an illness of several days.

She was a life-long resident of Union City being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Flory and was born in Jackson Township, Darke county, May 2, 1858.

She was united in marriage to Eli Rex, and to this union the following children were born: Nora McCoy, Flint, Mich., Rose Harshman, Union City and Frank Rex, deceased.

The following brothers and sister survive: Lydia Good, Clayton, O., Alice Good, Union City, Malinda Smith, Greenville, O.; Jacob Flory, Union City, Enos Flory, Union City, Dan Flory and David Flory, deceased.

Mrs. Rex was a life-long member of the Old German Baptist church and the funeral will take place from the Old German Baptist Church four miles east on the Wenrick pike, Thursday afternoon at 1 p. m. (CST), conducted by Elder King. Interment in the Brethren cemetery north of Union City.

The remains were removed to the residence of the deceased from the Fraze Funeral Home this afternoon.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, January 31, 1935

Death Calls. - Prominent Salamonia business man passes away this morning. - He was brought to the Union City hospital Tuesday.

F. T. Whitacre, a prominent business man of Salamonia, Ind., who was brought to the Union City hospital in a very critical condition Tuesday , passed away this morning at 40 minutes past 4 o'clock. He had been ill for the past three or four months.

Frances Tobias Whitacre was born in Ohio 65 years ago and 20 years ago he came to Salamonia and embarked in the general store business. Through honest and courteous treatment he built up a fine business and enjoyed a large measure of success and he took an active interest in the civic and social affairs of his adopted town.

He is survived by the widow who was formerly Miss Dora Eley, of Madison township, Jay County, and one son, Frances Whitacre of Cleveland, O.

Mr. Whitacre, Sr., was a member of a large family and he leaves six brothers and four sisters as follows: Ed. Whitacre of Connersville, Ind., Robert Whitacre of Richmond, Ind., William Whitacre of New Castle, Ind., Sam Whitacre of Portland, Ind., Durden Whitacre of Salamonia, and Dave Whitacre of New Cordon, Ind.; Mrs. Ella Cook , Selma, Ind., Mrs. Mable Reichard, Lightsville, O., Mrs. George Baker and Mrs. Charles Davis of Portland.

The funeral will take place Saturday at 2 p. m. from the M. E. church at Salamonia.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, January 31, 1935

Dr. Richardson dead.

Dr. J. V. Richardson, prominent surgeon and physician of Ft. Recovery, north of here, died at his home place following an extended illness, with pneumonia being the immediate cause.

Dr. Richardson was the son of the late Dr. and Mrs. John Richardson of Ft. Recovery and was born at that place and has practiced his profession there for more than 40 years. He took an active part in the civic and religious affairs of the community in which he lived and was a charter member of the Mercer County Medical association.

He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. John Premer, with whom he made his home and Dr. D. H. Richardson of this city.

Funeral services were held this afternoon from his late residence with Rev. H. J. Jewett in charge. Interment took place in the Greenmound cemetery at Ft. Recovery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, February 1, 1935

Rites for Murdered Youth are Saturday.

Farmland, Ind. --- Funeral services for Eugene Morris, 22, Farmland youth, who was slain near Tucson, Ariz., will be conducted at 10:30 o'clock Saturday morning at the local M. E. Church. The Rev. S. E. Carruth will officiate. Burial will be in the Woodlawn Cemetery. The body arrived here this afternoon and it was accompanied by Wilbur Wright, also of Farmland who accompanied the murdered yuth on a trip to the West with two other Farmland men. Young Morris left their camp near Tucson to climb a nearby moutain on December 18 and never returned. His body was found January 25.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, February 4, 1935

Many friends attend funeral services for Mrs. Thomas Lyons today. - She passed away at her home Saturday after long illness.

After a brave fight of nearly a year's duration Mrs. Thomas Lyons was forced to succumb and at 11 o'clock Friday night she closed her tired eyes, as her spirit winged its way to her heavenly home. Everything that loving care and medical attention could do was done, but the hand of fate said it was not to be.

Mrs. Thomas Lyons was formerly Miss Mary Cotter, tho her loving friends affectionately called her Mayme. She was the daughter of Byron and Julia Cotter and was born on the old Thornburg farm about two miles north of Union City, July 25, 1886 and she was therefore 48 years of age at the time of her demise.

She lived all of her life after her marriage in Union City. When she arrived at young womanhood she was married to Thomas Lyons. She was a devout member of the Catholic church and a valued member of the Rosary society.

The funeral services were held this Monday morning at 9 o'clock from the St. Mary's church conducted by Rev. Father Michael Shea. The flowers and floral tributes that were sent to the home on High street were many and very beautiful.

At the church the music of the Gregorian Requiem High Mass was sung by the church and children's choir combined under the direction of Sister Alicia with Miss Edithe Voisinet at the organ.

Rev. Father Shea paid a high tribute to the departed and spoke in eloquent language of her beautiful Christian life and her never failing good humor and unselfishness as a mother.

He also spoke words of comfort to the husband and children who also have the heartfelt sympathy of the many friends and the Times.

At the conclusion of the services the following pall bearers bore the handsome casket to the waiting funeral car: Wm. Cotter, Dan Cotter, Mike Cotter, John Cotter, Tom Welch and Tom Gilfoil.

Mrs. Lyons was laid to rest in the pretty St. Marys cemetery by the side of her beloved son Bernard who preceded her a few years ago to the land where there is no more parting or sorrow.

Mrs. Lyons is survived by the husband and the following children: Bernice, Edward, Joe, Helen, Bettie, Jack, J. C. and Mrs. Mary Dean Leahey. One grandson, Jimmie Tom Leahey. Also one sister, Miss Margaret Cotter and two brothers, Dan and Lee Cotter.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, February 5, 1935

Croup Victim. - Baby Janice Cook succumbs this morning at ten o'clock. - When discovered by her father her body was still warm.

The angel of death struck the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Cook, corner of Pearl and Walnut streets, a terrible blow this morning when he took from their midst their bright little baby girl, Janice, who was found by her father about ten o'clock this morning not cold in death for her body was still warm but her spirit had fled.

It is thought that her death was caused by a malignant attack of croup. This morning when George left for his work in the Pennsylvania R. R. offices baby Janice seemed to be quite well and was bright and cheerful. That was the last time the father saw her alive. The mother, who was formerly Miss Doris McCarthy, daughter of Supervisor Charles McCarthy and wife, was of course in and out of the room upstairs where the little one slept, but at no time did the mother see or hear anything unusual.

Baby Janice was born March 13, 1934, and was therefore only about six months of age. She is survived by the parents and one sister Doreen, aged 2.

The Times and the many friends extend deepest sympathy to the heartbroken parents and grandparents in their bitter sorrow and loss.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, February 8, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Lester Geyer, mother of Paul Geyer passes away. - She had been in frail health for the past several years.

Mrs. Lester S. Geyer, the mother of Paul Geyer, the well known mail carrier, passed away at 12:30 this morning, Feb. 8, 1935 at the residence, about one mile east of the city on the Greenville-Union City road.

Mrs. Geyer had not been in good health for the past several years and a week ago her condition became serious. Although everything possible was done for her she failed to rally and the end came as stated.

Mrs. Martha Jane Geyer was born in Whitestown, Ind., Sept. 28, 1866 and she was therefore 68 years of age at the time of her death.

She was the daughter of Abel and Martha (Jones) Harmon and she attended school in Whitestown. She was married to Lester S. Geyer at Whitestown, May 29, 1886 and she was the mother of four children who with the husband survive her. They are: Lida M. Geyer, Vestle M. Geyer, both of Richmond, Ind., Miss Ethel Marie, Allen And Paul Geyer, of Union City. One daughter, Gertrude Ditzenberger died in Jan. 1929.

There are also 13 grandchildren, the following three of whom made their home with their grandparents, Florence Ethel Ditzenberger, Henry Lester, and Ruth Jane Ditzenberger.

Mrs. Geyer was a fine Christian woman, a member of the Methodist church and she was a good mother and a faithful wife. When in health she was always ready to do any good work that needed to be done. She was of a pleasant disposition and therefore she leaves many friends to mourn her death and the Times joins them in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved husband and children.

The body is at the Fraze Funeral Home where friends may call. Further funeral services will be held Monday morning at Whitestown, Ind. Burial in the Whitestown cemetery. [A later Obituary published Feb. 18th stated that the marriage took place on May 2, 1886. There were seven children born of the marriage; two dying in infancy. She was also survived by two brothers, Elmer Harmon, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Charles Harmon of Lebanon, Ind.; two sisters, Matilda Small of Eaton, Tennessee and Mary Ottinger of Saint Louis, Missouri.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, February 8, 1935

Died Here. - Michael J. Coleman, a brother of John Coleman, deceased is called. - He had lived for many years at Camden, O.

Michael J. Coleman, a prominent resident of Camden, O. passed away in this city last night, after a protracted illness. He had been in failing health for several years and for several months he had been taking treatment at the Union City hospital. His condition became critical several days ago and he passed away Thursday at 6 o'clock in the evening.

Michael J. Coleman was born in Preble County, O., 67 years ago. When a young man he moved to the west and lived for some years in Kansas and Nebraska. He returned from the west some 30 years ago and since that time he has been living at Camden, O. and he also lived for a time in Greenville, O.

He was a brother of John Coleman who preceded him to the better world some years ago. He had been a visitor in Union City on many occasions and he was well known here and many friends here will regret to learn of his death.

He is survived by five sons and one daughter. The funeral will be held at Camden Monday morning. The interment will be in the cemetery at Eaton, O.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, February 11, 1935

Died --- George Hanes, 76 years old, former president of the old First Farmers National Bank at Arcanum, died at his late home, on South High street, that village at 6:30 a. m. Thursday after a lingering illness. His decline dated from a paralytic stroke four years ago, attendants state. He was well known in Union City.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, February 11, 1935

Called Home. - Rev. Ivan L Erbaugh passes away at Piqua, Ohio, hospital. - Was formerly pastor of the Union City Church of the Brethren.

The announcement of the death of Rev. Ivan L. Erbaugh, at the Piqua, O. hospital Saturday night, came as quite a shock to this his former residence, being pastor of the Church of the Brethren in this city, for ten years, until last August, when he with his family accepted the pastorate at Pleasant Hill, O. While pastor in Union City, he served as president of the Ministerial Association and took a keen interest in religious as well as civic affairs and numbered his friends by the legion. He was kindly and courteous to all who he came in contact and especially tolerant.

For the past three years he had suffered with ulcers of the stomach which grew so bad, that it was decided that the only relief that could be given him, was thru an operation, which was performed at the Piqua, Ohio, hospital Thursday and which disclosed that his condition was very serious, with practically no chance to recover, and as stated death ended his sufferings Saturday evening.

Rev. Erbaugh was born near Dayton, O., and before entering the ministry, was a city mail carrier in Dayton, O., and after moving to Union City acted as a substitute mail carrier in the Union City post office.

The funeral took place this afternoon from the Pleasant Hill, O. Brethren Church, conducted by Rev. H. B. Martin, of Gettysburg, O., assisted by Rev. Mark Shellha [?] of Pleasant Hill. Interment took place in the Eversole cemetery.

He leaves a wife, a daughter, Rachel, and two sons, Byron and Paul besides a host of relatives and friends to mourn his demise.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, February 11, 1935

Called Away. - Mrs. B. F. Harris passes away four weeks after sustaining a stroke. - She was the daughter of first Civil War hero buried in Arlington.

One by one the oldest residents of Union City who helped to make the city what it is and a desirable place in which to live are crossing over the bar.

The latest of these to join the great majority is Mrs. Ben F. Harris, who passed away Friday night, Feb. 8, at half past 10 o'clock after an illness which began four weeks ago when she suffered a stroke of paralysis.

Mrs. Retta (Reeves) Harris was the daughter of Andrew Jackson and Anna (Wiley) Reeves, and she was born May 13, 1861. Her father, Andrew Jackson Reeves, who was a brother of Dr. Reeves, of honored memory, lost his life in the civil war and to him the honor was accorded of being the first soldier to be buried in Arlington cemetery in Washington, D. C.

When she arrived at young womanhood she was joined in marriage to Ben F. Harris, who became famous as an interior decorator and he was also a fine cornetist and possessed a splendid tenor voice which was heard on many occasions.

There were four children born to this union, one son Frank, who died when six years old, Agnes, who died in infancy, and Mrs. Helen Pierce, who passed away about two years ago. The husband and father, Ben Harris, died some twenty-five years ago.

One daughter, Mrs. Virgil Lambert, of Chicago, Ill., survives.

Mrs. Harris was a woman of fine character, charming personality and refinement, and she was loved by all who knew her. Her gentle disposition and pleasing social qualities made for her many friends who with the Times extend sincere sympathy to the surviving relatives in their sorrow and great loss.

Mrs. Harris was a valued member of the 20th Century club and during her years of health was active in club and church work. She will be greatly missed and long remembered.

The funeral took place today, Monday, Feb. 11, from the home on West Oak street, at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Chas. McCallister. Burial in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, February 11, 1935

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kline attend funeral of mother.

The many friends of Mrs. Walter Kline will regret to learn of the death of her mother, Mrs. Clara J. Moore, Saturday afternoon in Foote Memorial Hospital, Jackson, Mich. Mrs. Kline being called to Jackson on Friday by a telegram announcing the seriousness of her mother. Mrs. Moore had been ill with pneumonia followed by complications which necessitated an operation. She is survived by three children, Mrs. Walter Kline of this city, Miss Mildred Moore of Jackson, Mich. and William Moore of Dayton, Ohio. There are five grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at the Royer Undertaking Parlor in Dayton Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock with the Rev. Hugh I. Evans of Westminster Presbyterian Church officiating. Interment will be in Woodlawn Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Kline left for Dayton this afternoon to attend the funeral. Mrs. Moore was well known to the friends of the Kline family as she was a frequent visitor here having spent the Christmas holidays with her daughter.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, February 12, 1935

Tragedy takes place in a home at Parker, Ind. - Wm. H Marker, wounds his wife and kills himself.

Parker, Ind. --- Wm. H. Marker, 37, formerly an employe of the Indiana Wire Mill of Muncie, shot and seriously wounded his wife, Ellen, 27, about 5 o'clock this afternoon and then committed suicide with a shot gun at their garage home here in a fit of despondency over ill health.

His wife was taken to the Randolph County Hospital at Winchester, where her condition was reported as critical.

Several years of misfortune preceded the tragedy, friends said.

Mr. Marker had been worrying over his condition, which prevented him from working but little this winter, and the condition of a daughter, Evelyn, 11, who is confined to her bed with a heart affliction. He was suffering from stomach ulcers.

Their home burned three years ago and the family, which includes five other small children, had since lived in the garage on the property. It was said that the family was on relief here.

The children were the only witnesses to the shooting, and they summoned the aid of neighbors for their mother. They said that their mother was standing on a small porch when shot and that their father went out to the orchard, where he shot himself. His body was found there and the coroner was called to investigate.

They also said that their father had threatened to kill their mother just recently. Neighbors said the couple did not quarrel and that Mr. Marker seemed in his usual spirits when carrying home groceries about a half hour earlier.

The charge from the shotgun struck Mrs. Marker in the right side and arm. She was still conscious when the ambulance reached the hospital, but had lost considerable blood.

The couple had been married about eight years and most of that time had been spent in Parker. Their children are Ulla Ann, Evelyn, Sylvia, Lillie Mae, Doris and a baby. The oldest is seven years of age. They were taken to the home of Mrs. Marker's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles McNees.

Funeral arrangements have not been made for Mr. Marker. His relatives were not known by neighbors.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, February 12, 1935

Casket which he made from a walnut tree he was buried in. - S. G. Wolford dies on his farm near Winchester, Indiana.

Winchester, Ind. --- S. G. Wolford, who died Saturday at his farm northwest of Winchester, was buried this afternoon in a casket which Wolford himself made out of a walnut tree he had cut down on his farm. He also made the base for his tombstone out a a meteor which he found near his home. Wolford was a violin maker and was well known in this field throughout this section of the country.

The casket, which was beautifully made, was just five feet nine inches long and only as wide as the man himself; as it was necessary to place the body on the side. His funeral directors are the only ones in Randolph County who ever buried a man in a home-made casket.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, February 13, 1935

Wounds received by Parker woman proves fatal. - She died at the Winchester Hospital and leaves six children.

Winchester, Ind. --- Mrs. Ellen Marker, 27, of Parker, died in the Randolph County Hospital here at midnight of shot gun wounds suffered Monday when her husband, William, turned the gun on her in their home during a fit of despondency. Marker committed suicide in the yard of their home after shooting her. Six children were left orphans by the tragedy.

Mrs. Marker was shot through the abdomen and in the shoulder, the abdominal wounds causing her death. Relatives had not taken charge of the body at 1:30 o'clock this morning but it was expected that it would be taken to a Farmland mortuary. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles McNees, who reside in Farmland, took the children home Monday night.

[Double funeral services were held on Thursday at the Parker Methodist church for Mr. and Mrs. William H. Marker. Rev. Harvey Thornburg, assisted by Rev. N. E. Smith of Parker, had charge of the service. Mrs. Marker was buried in Maxville cemetery. There was no mention where Mr. Marker was buried.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, February 13, 1935

Relative of Lincoln dies near Portland.

Portland, Ind. --- Mrs. Ida Jane Journey, 75, died at 1 o'clock Tuesday morning at her home, one mile southwest of Portland, following a lingering illness. She was a descendant of General Winfield Scott and her father was a cousin of Abraham Lincoln, who's birthday was celebrated Tuesday.

Surviving are the husband, Joseph R. Journey, one son, Raymond Journey; one sister, Mrs. William Myers, of Portland, and four brothers, Frank H. Hanks, of New Mt. Pleasant, William Scott Hanks, of Muncie, Alvin Hanks, of northeast of Portland and Guss A. Hanks, of Blaine road.

The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon from the home in charge of Dr. H. N. Renald, assisted by the Rev. Herbert T. Neve. Burial will be in the Liber Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, February 13, 1935

Mrs. Margaret Maher dies at her home.

Greenville, Ohio --- Funeral services for Mrs. Margaret C. Maher, wife of J. B. Maher, who passed away at her home, 519 Ash street, Monday afternoon, will be conducted from St. Mary's Catholic Church, Thursday morning at 9 o'clock.

Mrs. Maher had been ailing for an extended period and had been confined to her home for the past two years. Surviving relatives include her husband and two children, Lawrence and Margaret, at home.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, February 14, 1935

John Cox passes away.

Farmland, Ind. --- Funeral services for John Cox, 81 years old, who died at his home near here, Thursday morning, will be held at the Jericho Church at 10:45 a. M. Sunday, Rev. Charles E. Hiatt, officiating. Burial will be in a nearby cemetery. Because of the services the Friends Church will not conduct the usual 10:30 a. m. worship.

Surviving Mr. Cox are the widow; two sons, Carl, Ridgeville, Earl, Winchester; a brother, George Cox, Union City; a sister, Mrs. Bertha Harris, California.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, February 18, 1935

Pioneer Lady. - Mrs. Joseph Miller passes away after long and useful life. - She was born when Hillgrove was in a wilderness in 1846.

One of our oldest and most highly respected pioneer women was called to her reward when Mrs. Joseph Miller, passed away at her home 119 Division street, East Side.

Mrs. Miller had been more or less of a n invalid during the past year and about ten days ago her condition was complicated with an attack of Erysipolas and she passed quietly and peacefully away Sunday, Feb. 17 at 12 o'clock noon.

Mrs. Margaret J. Miller was the daughter of Thomas and Eliza (Garver) Armstrong and she was born in or near Hillgrove in 1846, when Hillgrove was surrounded by a wilderness of forests. Here she attended school and in October of 1866 she was married to Joseph Miller. Before her marriage, Mrs. Miller was employed in the Branham hotel.

A few years after her marriage Mr. and Mrs. Miller, daughter Flora and son George moved to Kansas where they took up a section of land which later, through some sort of deal they lost, whereupon Mr. Miller went to Idaho for his health while Mrs. Miller and the children moved back to Hillgrove. The husband Joseph Miller died about four years ago. Mrs. Miller moved to Union City about ten years ago. She was a good, kind, Christian woman of fine character who lived for her family and she was a devout member of the Dunkard church.

Abraham Lincoln became president of the United States when Margaret Miller was 14 years old and she was rich in the lore of those stirring times of our country.

As long as her health permitted she was always ready to help in any good cause. During her long and useful life she made many friends who will regret to hear of her death, and whom the Times joins in extending sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

She is survived by four children as follows: Mrs. Flora Hoblit, George Miller, Mrs. Zona McVey, St. Ignatious, Montana, and Henry Miller. Also 18 grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren. [Funeral services were held at the residence on Tuesday, Feb. 19th., conducted by Rev. Charles Stocksdale. Interment was made in the Snell cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, February 19, 1935

Auto Crash. - Results in death of Dayton, O. woman whose husband, Greenville injured. - Three other occupants of car, wrecked near Greenville, injured.

Greenville, Ohio, Feb. 19. --- The condition of Harry Horst, 41 years old, Dayton, injured Saturday night in an automobile accident, north of Greenville, in which his wife, Ruth, 31 years old, was fatally injured, was reported slightly improved but still regarded critical, at Greenville Hospital. His most serious injury is a skull fracture.

Mrs. Horst, who also suffered a skull fracture, died at the local hospital Sunday morning.

The accident occurred on Ohio 127 near Pikeville. While Mrs. Horst was driving the car, en route to Versailles, it skidded on the wet pavement on a turn and crashed into a tree.

Three other occupants of the car, all Dayton residents, were injured. They are Frank Voekl, compound fracture of the left arm, head lacerations; Mrs. Frank Voekl, broken collar bone, fractured pelvis; Mrs. Ruth Young, lacerations and shock. They have all been removed to the Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, February 20, 1935

End Comes. - Mrs. Emely Throp passed away last night in Pittsburgh, Pa. - Funeral will take place from residence of her son in this city Thursday.

Mrs. Emely Throp, 76, passed away in a hospital in Pittsburgh, Pa. last night where she has been making her home with her daughter, Mrs. E. L. Moses, formerly Mrs. Reno Welbourne of this city, for the past few years.

Mrs. Throp, formerly lived in this city and was the widow of the late Alonzo Throp, who died in Louisiana nine years ago and was buried in that state.

Her daughter was here last week and was called back to Pittsburgh, Pa. on account of her serious illness. Besides her daughter, Mrs. E. L. Moses, she leaves one son, Harry Throp in this city, on West Oak street, to whose home the remains will be taken tomorrow (Thursday) morning and from where the funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. C. G. McCallister. Interment in the City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, February 21, 1935

Crash Victim. - Harry Horst, Dayton, O., succumbs at Greenville, O. Hospital. - Is the second victim in auto accident.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Harry Horst, 41 years old, Dayton, one of five people injured in an automobile accident three miles northeast of Greenville, Saturday night, passed away at the local hospital Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock.

Horst's wife, Ruth, 31 years old, died early Sunday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Horst both suffered fractured skulls.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Vokle and Mrs. Ruth Young, three other crash victims, also of Dayton, were returned to that city from the local hospital, Sunday afternoon.

Mrs. Vokle, who sustained a broken collar bone and fractured pelvis, is said to be in a critical condition at Good Samaritan Hospital.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, February 21, 1935

Died. --- Mrs. Fanny Slife, age 76 years, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Bruss, West Division Street. The body was removed to the Fraze Funeral Home and will be returned to her late residence on West Division street, Thursday afternoon. Friends may call at the home at any time. Funeral services will be conducted Saturday at 2 p. m. at the Presbyterian Church in Winchester, in charge of Rev. Payne. Interment in Saratoga cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, February 22, 1935

Passes away. - Mrs. Bridget Higi dies at her home in Muncie, Ind. - Funeral will take place Saturday morning.- Burial at St. Mary's cemetery near this city.

Muncie, Ind. --- Mrs. Bridget Higi, 73, wife of Joseph F. Higi and mother of Delaware County's prosecuting attorney, died at her home, 717 North Els St., Wednesday at 5:15 p. m. following an illness of two weeks. Funeral services will be conducted at St. Lawrence Catholic Church, Saturday at 9 a. m. , by Father E. J. Houlihan. Burial will be in the Catholic Cemetery at Union City.

Surviving besides the husband are two sons, Clarence G. Higi, county prosecutor, and Raymond Higi of Fort Wayne, and a daughter, Mrs. Elsie Mercker of Quincy, Illinois.

Mrs. Higi was born near Richmond. She lived in and near Union City for many years, coming to Muncie in 1917. She was a member of the St. Lawrence Church, of the Altar and Rosary Society, and of the St. Vincent DePaul Aid Society.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, February 25, 1935

Mustered Out. - Comrade Samuel Hutton answers the call of Great Commander. - Was one of the last seven of local civil war veterans. - He passed away after long illness at 5:05 Saturday afternoon.

Again taps have sounded for one of the brave and honored veterans of the civil war who answered their country's call in the perilous days of 1860-1865. Samuel C. was one of the last seven surviving civil war veterans of Union City. Those who are still living are Jake Fisher, Jake Ludy, Cliff C. Platt, William Kerr and William Willis. [They forgot David C. Moist.]

Comrade Hutton had not been well for several years and his condition became serious last week. He closed his eyes in the sleep that knows no awakening Saturday afternoon at five minutes after 5 o'clock.

Comrade Samuel C. Hutton was born Sept. 19, 1845 [corrected, printed as 1834] at Sidney, O., and he was therefore 89 years of age at the time of his death.

He came to Union City from Warsaw, Ind., seventy-one years ago, to embark in the harness business in partnership with Robert Johnson, their place of business on Columbia street being known as the Hutton and Johnson harness shop in a frame building which stood just south of where Joe's Spot is located. He gave up harness making to accept a place in the Big 4 freight depot, and later he took a similar place in the local Panhandle freight department. In the course of time he was promoted to the position of ticket agent in the Pennsylvania Lines passenger depot, and a place where he held with honor and credit until about nineteen years ago when he was place on the retired list. He was still in good health at that time and possessed of all his fine faculties so that the company called him back on the job, and he served them again faithfully and well.

Mr. Hutton was married to Miss Nancy Ellen Lenox, daughter of Alfred and Frances Lenox. Mrs. Hutton died 19 years ago; since which time and up to the time of his passing, Comrade Hutton resided under the living care of his daughter, Mrs. Nettie White, on North Columbia street. Comrade Hutton was always interested in civic affairs of the city of his adoption. He was a member of the G. A. R., an elder in the First Presbyterian church, and he was a member of and actively interested in the I. O. O. F. lodge. It was due to his interest and that of Robert Clark and John Grahs, of honored memory that the present fine I. O. O. F. building and lodge hall was built. The above three members gave their personal notes to the bank for funds so that the erection of the building could be completed.

Sam Hutton was one of the best liked men in Union City and his going will be sincerely mourned by a large circle of friends. He lived a good life. He fought a good fight and he will be long remembered as a man who did much for Union City.

He is survived by the following sons: al Hutton of Dayton; Robert Hutton of Marion, Ind.; Charles (Bun) Hutton of Piqua, O.; and one daughter, Mrs. Nettie White. Also three grandchildren and one brother, Edward Hutton, a retired business man of Chicago, Ill.

[Funeral services were conducted at the residence on Monday in charge of Rev. A. C. Wischmeier and Rev. Forbes Robertson. Interment in the City Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, February 27, 1935

Suicide. - Bluffton man ends his earthly career by inhaling auto gas. - Friends say that he had been despondent several days.

Bluffton, Ind. --- Morris Rolli, 46, lineman for the Illinois Pipe Line Company for fourteen years, committed suicide at his garage here today by inhaling carbon monoxide gas from his automobile. Friends said he had been despondent several days.

His body was found at 9 o'clock tonight. The windows and doors of the building were closed, the auto's ignition key was on and the gasoline tank empty, according to Coroner William Thoma. The coroner said his verdict will be death from carbon monoxide gas inhaled with suicidal intent.

Surviving are one daughter, Romiane, a student nurse at a Fort Wayne hospital; his divorced wife, Mrs. Bessie Rolli, of here; his mother, Mrs. Gotlieb Rolli, of Vera Cruz, a sister, Mrs. Ruth Keplinger, of Bluffton, and four brothers, Walter, Allen Tirl and Mont. He was a member of Elks and Moose lodges. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, March 1, 1935

Called Away. - Mrs. George Stough died this morning in Chicago. - She was at the home of her sons, Vernon and Russell Stough.

Although Mrs. George Stough had been ill for some time, the news of her death this morning proved a shock to the many Union City friends.

Mrs. Stough, who was sixty-four years of age, had been ill for many months, and two weeks ago her sons, Vernon and Russell Stough, of Chicago, in their care came after their mother and took her to their home, 9080 Justin Street. She was ill when she made the trip but seemed to stand the journey very well, and later her condition seemed to improve. Then, came a relapse and she passed away this Friday morning at half-past three o'clock.

Mrs. Stough, with her husband and two sons came to Union City about thirty years ago and they resided at the corner of Walnut and Division streets. Mr. Stough took charge of the local Panhandle tower, which at that time was located west of the city and later was moved to its present location.

Mrs. Stough was of deeply religious nature and later became identified with the Christian Science faith in which she took a leading part and she was largely responsible for the establishment of the Church in Union City.

She was a kindly, pleasant woman, who lived for her family and her faith, and she was always willing and ready to do more than her share of any good work that needed to be done. She was the mother of Vernon and Russell Stough, both graduates of our high school, and both of whom made good in their avocations in Chicago. She is survived by the husband, George Stough, the two sons and one grandson, and the Times joins the many friends in extending to them sincere sympathy in their hour of great loss and sorrow.

The body will arrive in Union City over the Pennsylvania Lines Saturday afternoon at 3:25 and will be taken to the Fraze Funeral Home. Immediately after arrival the cortege will form and proceed to the Union City cemetery where there will be a short service, and the body will be placed in the receiving vault there to remain until the burial takes place.

The remains will be accompanied to Union City by George Stough, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Stough and Mr. and Mrs. Russell Stough.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, March 1, 1935

Funeral for Rev. H. B. Martin to take place Sunday. - Rev. Martin killed when car is struck at grade crossing.

Greenville, O. --- Funeral services for Rev. Howard B. Martin, 53 years old, former pastor of the Oakland Church of the Brethren at Gettysburg, will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon from Oakland church. Burial will be made in Gettysburg cemetery.

Rev. Martin was killed this morning when his automobile was struck broadside by a westbound Pennsylvania passenger train at a crossing one-half mile west of Horatio, O., seven miles east of Greenville.

Members of the train crew were the only witnesses to the accident. The engineer of the train said the automobile was driven onto the tracks after he blew the whistle as he neared the crossing.

Rev. Martin was dead when his body was removed from the automobile wreckage which was carried more than two hundred feet down the tracks.

The Horatio crossing is at an angle but the vision in either direction is not obscured. Coroner R. J. Marker, of Versailles, is investigating the mishap.

Rev. Martin had been prominent in church affairs in Darke county and had held the Gettysburg pastorate for several years.

He is survived by his widow, Stella; two daughters, Mildred and Edith, and a son, Lavon.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, March 6, 1935

Called Home. - Hugh T. (Doc) Alexander passes away this morning. - Was one of Randolph County's most prominent retired farmers.

Hugh T. (Doc) Alexander, 86, one of Randolph county's oldest and most highly respected citizens, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Martin Warren, in Jackson Township this morning at 5 o'clock, after an illness of several months.

He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Alexander and was born at Eaton, Ohio, February 17, 1849, and came to this county and settled near Saratoga.

He attended the old Middletown school and after growing to manhood he had followed the occupation of a tiller of the soil and was one of Randolph county's most influential and successful farmers.

He was a life-long member of the I. O. O. F. lodge and M. E. church, and took a keen interest in the preservation of wild game in this section. In fact, his farm was one of the first to be designated as a state game preserve in Randolph county.

His wife deceased a few years ago and he is survived by the following children: James W. Anderson, of R. R. 4; Acil Alexander, of Saratoga, Ind., and Mrs. Laura Warren, R. R. 4, where he had been making his residence.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral Home in this city and prepared for burial and were returned to the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Martin Warren, six miles north of Union City.

The funeral will take place from the Methodist church in Saratoga, Ind., Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. J. A. Watson. Interment in the Lisbon cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, March 6, 1935

Child dies. - As result of being struck by an automobile. - Funeral services for mishap victim will be held Friday afternoon.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Three year old Patricia West died at 7:50 o'clock tonight at Greenville hospital of injuries received when she was struck by an automobile in the road in front of her home at Fry's Corner late yesterday afternoon.

The child had been playing with two of her sisters by the road and ran into the path of a car driven by Eugene McMiller. McMiller was absolved of blame in the mishap.

The child is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles West, and four brothers and three sisters.

Funeral services will be held from the home at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon. Burial will be made in West Grove cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that Patricia Lou West was born May 13, 1931, in Greenville, the daughter of Charles West (b. Bradford, KY) and Dottie Beeler (b. Rushville, IN.)]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, March 11, 1935

Cyclist is killed while rounding a curve near Greenville, Ohio. - Greenville company department foreman will be buried today.

Greenville, O. --- John Frye, 22 year old, was killed at 6:30 o'clock when he was thrown from his motorcycle while riding in the Greenville-West Milton pike.

According to Roy Sink, who was riding with Frye at the time of the accident, told officers that Frye was thrown head-long from his machine when the front wheel of the cycle struck a stone as they were rounding a curve about one mile east of Greenville. Frye received a broken neck, fractured shoulder and other injuries.

Frye was employed as foreman in the knitting department of the General Athletic Products company here.

The son of Mr. and Mrs. William D. Frye, 26 Riffle avenue, he is survived by his parents and four brothers, George, Francis, Robert and Harold.

The family formerly resided at Tippecanoe City, coming to Greenville about four years ago.

Funeral services will be held Monday and burial in Greenville cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home Records state that John Wilbur Frye was born July 18, 1912 at Piqua, OH, the son of Wibur D. Frye (b. Unity, NH) and Anne E. Taylor (b. Benton, VT).]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, March 11, 1935

Brought here. - Will be the remains of Mrs. Barney F. McGill for burial. - She passed away at her home in Ft. Wayne Saturday.

Word was received here Sunday of the death of Mrs. Barney F. McGill which occurred at her home in Ft. Wayne Saturday morning about eight o'clock. She was formerly Miss Anna Ryan, of the Deerfield Boulevard. She is survived by three children, Catherine E., Thomas R. and James F.

Her husband Barney McGill, who died some years ago, was one of our leading business men.

The funeral services will be held in Ft. Wayne Tuesday morning and the burial will be in the St. Mary's cemetery north of this city and the remains will arrive about 12:30 Central Standard Time.

Mrs. Margaret Anna McGill was born near Crete, Ind., and she was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Ryan, with whom she lived at the family home near Arthur's Corners until she moved to Union City. She was a fine Christian woman, a life-long member of the Catholic church and she was devoted to her family. Many friends here will regret to hear of her death.

Besides the children she is survived by two sisters, Miss Elizabeth Ryan and Mrs. James Hart of Union City.

The family moved to Ft. Wayne from Union City about twelve or fourteen years ago.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, March 12, 1935

Passes Away. - Mrs. William Magill dies at her home this morning. - Had spent her entire life in this city.

Mrs. William Magill, 86, after an illness for several years, passed away this morning at 10:15 o'clock at her home, 516 North State Line street. She was a life-long resident of this city and a true, lovable Christian woman, who devoted her life's work toward making her home a happy and contented place and was a member of the U. B. church.

Besides her husband she leaves one son, Oscar of Dawn, O., besides a host of relatives and friends to mourn her demise.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral home, where they will be prepared, pending the arrival of her son and the making preparation for the funeral service.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, March 13, 1935

Oliver Mikesell funeral Thursday afternoon.

Oliver Mikesell, 63 years old, died Tuesday morning at the home of his brother, Prof. Merrill Mikesell of Indiana University, Bloomington. He is survived by his sisters, Mrs. S. H. Welsh, Union City, Mrs. W. W. Bretz, Greenville, Mrs. Hall Richards, Cleveland; his brothers, Professor Mikesell and Henry Mikesell, Bartonia, Ohio [Ind. ?].

Funeral services will be held Thursday at 2 p. m. at the South Salem Church, Rev. John A. Watson officiating. Burial in Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, March 18, 1935

Passes Away. - Fred Jackson loses in his long and brave fight for life. - His illness began with a stroke about four years ago.

After a long, brave, but losing battle covering a period of four years, Fred Jackson, the well-known painter and decorator, succumbed to his illness and he passed away at nine o'clock Saturday evening at his home 511 Chestnut street.

The beginning of his illness was a stroke of paralysis four years ago, and which kept him confined to his bed for the past three years. The direct cause of his death was a cerebral hemorrhage.

Fred Jackson was the son of Henry and Elizabeth (Norcross) Jackson and he was born on Christmas day, Dec. 25, 1870.

He came to Union City when quite a young man and has been a citizen of Union City most of his life. When still a young man he learned to be an expert painter, and artistic interior decorator which occupation he followed up to the time of his illness. He was honest and industrious and his work was always a satisfaction to his friends and patrons. Mr. Jackson also resided in Greenville.

He leaves his devoted life's companion, four daughters, Mrs. Joe Flory, Mrs. Wm. Netzley, Mrs. Bess Ayers, of Union City, and Miss Grace Jackson, of the Interstate Telephone Corporation; three sons, Harry and Grant Jackson, of Greenville, and Ray Jackson of Richmond. Thirteen grandchildren. Also, two sisters, Mrs. Harry Landis, of Richmond, and Mrs. Fred Baker, of Dayton. His parents and two brothers have preceded him to the land of no more parting.

Mr. Jackson was a good Christian and a member of the Church of the Brethren, from which church the funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock (CST), conducted by Rev. R. N. Leatherman, assisted by Rev. C. E. Baker. Interment in the City cemetery.

The Times joins the many friends of the family in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved relatives in their hour of sorrow and loss.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, March 19, 1935

Called Home. - Mrs. Ida C. Laurence passes away after several months illness. - She had lived in Union City practically all of her life.

Mrs. Ida C. Laurence, who has been confined to her bed at her home, 223 South Columbia street, the past four months, succumbed to her illness early this morning. She made a valiant fight and the end came at fifteen minutes after one o'clock

Mrs. Laurence was born in Union City, Ind., Sept. 10, 1869, and she was therefore 65 years of age at the time of her death. She was the daughter of Abraham and Mahala (Bennett) Welker and she attended school in number 10 school, west of the city which was razed to the ground a few years ago.

When she arrived at young womanhood she was married to John Laurence, who preceded her to the land of peace and rest in 1931.

She was a fine woman, a faithful wife and a good mother.

She performed her life's work faithfully and well and many friends will regret to learn of her death; and they joined by the Times extend sincere sympathy to the surviving relatives.

She leaves one son, Russel Laurence, four brothers, Henry, George and Clever Welker of Union City, and William Welker of Muncie, and two sisters, Mrs. Laura Gray, and Mrs. Cora Crawford of Union City.

The body will be returned to the residence from the funeral home Wednesday morning where friends may call.

The funeral will take place from the Fraze funeral home Thursday, March 21, at 2 p. m., conducted by Rev. R. N. Leatherman of the Church of the Brethren. Interment in the Lisbon cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, March 19, 1935

Jay County farmer ends life with gun in drunken stupor.

Portland, Ind. --- Mose Hart, 42, farmer, committed suicide at 7:30 o'clock tonight at his home seven miles northwest of Portland. He shot himself in the left ear with a .22 calibre rifle, while in a drunken stupor, authorities were told.

Hart, his wife and niece and nephew, Betty, and Junior Braden, had visited Portland during the day and Hart began drinking, they said. When they returned home, he grabbed the rifle and his wife tried to take it away from him. In the scuffle, it went off, the shot striking the wall at their home.

Mrs. Hart then ran to the home of a neighbor Lewis Caster, for help and when they returned he was dead. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, March 21, 1935

Old Barber. - Colored tonsorial artist passes away at home on East Side. - He had been in barber business here for some years.

Charles Price, the well known colored barber, passed away this morning at 7 o'clock at his home on Sycamore street, after a two months illness. He was the son of Charles Price, Sr., and was born in Mattoon, Ill., April 26, 1858. He had conducted a barber shop in Union City for some years and when he was taken with his last illness his shop was located at his home on Sycamore street. He was a good barber and he enjoyed the patronage of his fellow citizens and friends.

He was a good Christian and a member of the Baptist Church of Noblesville, where the funeral will take place Saturday, March 23, at 2:30 p. m. , conducted by Rev. Warfield. Interment in Noblesville cemetery.

He is survived by the following children: Mrs. Laura Lewis, Indianapolis; Mrs. Ruth Mason, South Bend, Ind.; Mrs. Mattie Ramey, Kalamazoo, and Robert Price, Richmond, Va. Also two brothers, Henry Price, Milton, Okla. and Henry Price, Litchfield, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, March 22, 1935

Lived Here. - Grover Shaner passed away at Denver, Colo., Wednesday morning. - He was the nephew of Margaret Walden and Mrs. Durdin.

Word reached Union City this morning of the death of Grover Shaner, which occurred in the hospital in Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, March 20, 1935 after an illness of some weeks.

He was the nephew of Miss Margaret Walden and Mrs. Elizabeth Durdin, of this city, and he made his home with Miss Walden about twenty-five years ago.

Grover or "Milt" as he was called by his friends, worked in the Corbin grocery and later he took up telegraphing under George Stough. When the World War broke out he was among the first to enlist and owing to his knowledge of telegraphy and the work of a lineman, he became a valuable man to the army of the U. S. He saw much service here and at the front "over there," making for himself a fine record. He was about 45 years of age at the time of his death.

Many old friends here will regret to learn of his death, and the Times joins them in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

The funeral will take place at his former home in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and he will be laid to rest in the Wyoming cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, March 26, 1935

Died --- Mrs. Alma Michener returned to her home in Winchester after being at the bedside of her sister, Mrs. Nona M. Day.

Mrs. Day passed away March 15th, near Noblesville, Ind. The funeral was conducted at the Evans funeral home in Noblesville Sunday, March 17th. Burial at the family cemetery south of Carmel.

Mrs. Day had spent some time with her sister, Mrs. Michener, the past five years and mad many friends in Union City while here.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, March 28, 1935

Body of Jay Co. farmer is found in ruins of home.

Portland. --- In the debris of a farm residence six miles west of here, searchers today found the body of David L. Whaley, 60 years old.

Whaley, a batchelor, lived alone on the farm. He is believed to have been trapped in his house when it was destroyed by fire early this morning.

Neighbors rushed to the house but were unable to enter. Whaley was not seen after the fire was discovered. Survivors are three sisters.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, March 29, 1935

Pastor's wife dies in Florida.

Winchester, Ind. --- Word has been received here from Mrs. Jennie L. Miller, of Winchester, who is spending the winter in Florida, of the sudden death of Mrs. Frank Cornell, wife of the Rev. Frank Cornell at the home at Green Cove Springs, Fla., on Monday. The Rev. Mr. Cornell was pastor of the Winchester Friends Church for fifteen years. The family moved from Winchester to Florida, where they have since resided.

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