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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, October 2, 1934

I. M. Bridgeman.

In the death of Editor I. M. Bridgeman of the Winchester Journal-Herald, which took place at Indianapolis, Ind. Monday, this county loses one of the most prominent and beloved citizens. A man of sterling integrity, and the type of man who was universally loved and respected by all who knew him.

He was a man of strong temperance and during his long newspaper career, refused to take any advertising matter that was frowned upon by the religious organizations.

When a man dies at his post of duty, as did Editor Bridgeman, it is fitting that due homage should be paid to his life's career, for he was plain spoken, unassuming and kindly in disposition and above all a true friend.

Personally the Times is saddened by his demise, for he was ever a close fraternal friend of this newspaper, during our years of close affiliation it was a pleasure to be with him, both socially and in a business way and he was one of those many in the newspaper business who could be trusted for his utmost co-operation under any and all circumstances. He never double-crossed a lifelong friend, but on the other hand, did everything possible within his power to advance the work of journalism.

He was absolutely unselfish, always thoughtful of others and ever doing something to promote their happiness. His characteristics were what Wadsworth calls:

The best portion of a good man's life--

His little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and of love.

[Funeral services were conducted on Wednesday afternoon at the Winchester Presbyterian Church conducted by Rev. G. M. Payne, pastor, assisted by Rev. Jackson of the Christian Church. No burial place was named. He was survived by a widow but she was not named.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, October 2, 1934

Found Dead. - J. I. Boomershine found dead in shed by workers. - Was night watchman at Gasson farm; Tentative rites set for tomorrow.

Greenville, O., Oct. 2. --- John I, Boomershine, 52 years old, a night watchman at the Gasson poultry farm near Versailles, was found dead in a small shed there at 7 o'clock Monday morning by fellow employees.

Coroner R. J. Marker, who investigated said death was due to a heart attack, which evidently occurred four or five hours before the body was discovered.

Boomershine was a native of the Versailles vicinity and had passed his entire life there. He had been employed at the Gasson farm for several years.

He leaves a widow, two children, Ralph, at home, and Mrs. Bridget Lantz, of Dayton, O.; two brothers and one sister.

Mrs. Boomershine who only recently recovered from the effects of a surgical operation, has been visiting with her daughter in Dayton for the last week.

Pending her return to Versailles no definite burial arrangements will be completed, although tentative plans call for services at the St. Denis Catholic Church Wednesday morning. Interment will be made in St. Valbert's cemetery near Versailles.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, October 2, 1934

Druggist. - At Greenville, O. dies suddenly at his home. - Charles M. Weisenberger funeral services to be held tomorrow.

Greenville, O., Oct. 2. --- Charles M. Weisenberger, 64 years old, died early Monday morning from a heart ailment at his home, 624 Washington street. He was an old resident of this city and conducted a drug store at Third street and Broadway. He was engaged in the drug business for 53 years having for many years been associated with his late brother, Ora Weisenberger. Besides his widow he is survived by one son, Dr. Harold Weisenberger, of Lima, and one daughter, Mrs. J. L. Sagebiel, of Dayton; one sister and three brothers.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday at 2:30 o'clock with Rev. Ralph Jennings in Charge. The body will be placed in the Greenville mausoleum.

[Miller Funeral Home records state that he was born June 4, 1870 at Gordon, OH, the son of Adam Weisenbarger (b. Gordon, OH) and Frances Hoagwood (b. Ithaca, OH.)]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, October 3, 1934

Burns. - Sustained by Jay County ex-legislator prove fatal. - John Hammitt fatally burned in a furnace blast.

Portland, Ind. --- John Hammitt, 60, former state representative from Jay County, died at 7:30 o'clock last night in the Decatur Hospital of burns sustained Monday morning when coal oil he was using to start a furnace fire exploded. He was burned about the head and body.

Mr. Hammitt was a member of the Indiana house of representatives about 10 years ago, and had been trustee of Jackson Township, twice. He is survived by the widow, his mother, Mrs. Mary Hammitt, who made her home with him west of Bryan; two sons, Frank, of the U. S. Navy and Hugh, of Ft. Wayne, one sister, Mrs. Faye Snyder, of Jackson Township and one brother, Frank, of Cincinnati. He was an active member of the Republican [party] and a prominent farmer of this county.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, October 3, 1934

Fast Train. - Strikes a Darke County man who is killed. - William Schafer is instantly killed in accident at Greenville, Ohio.

Greenville, Ohio. --- William Schafer, 64 years old, of this place, was instantly killed by a westbound Penn. fast mail train at about 4:45 o'clock this evening. The train, which was approximately 30 minutes late, struck the automobile which Schafer was driving at the Marquis avenue crossing, near the local stockyards.

Schafer, driving north on Marquis avenue, is said to have driven onto the tracks into the path of the train. The car and the man's body were carried between 150 and 200 feet down the tracks. The body was badly mangled and the car was demolished.

The deceased was a retired farmer and had lived on Marquis avenue in Greenville. He is survived by the widow, two sons, William, at home and J. C., at Louisville, Ky.; one daughter, Mrs. Opal Clark of near Dayton. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

Coroner R. J. Marker of Versailles investigated the accident.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, October 4, 1934

Passed On. - Wm. DeBolt died this morning at home North State Line Street. - For many years worked at Carriage Works and Backstay Co.

The death of William DeBolt, which occurred this morning at 6 o'clock at the family home on North State Line Street, marks the passing of one of the most brilliant veterinarians of his day, though he only followed that profession for a few years. He was ill for about four months with a complication of ailments.

Wm. DeBolt was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William DeBolt who came from England and settled near New Lisbon where William, Jr. was born. His mother was a Harshman.

Later the family moved to Union City and they resided in a house which stood where the public library now stands.

William attended school in Union City and where a very young man he learned the carriage trimming trade at the Union City Carriage Works under Sandy Harshman, and he worked in the U. C. Carriage Works trimming department for a number of years.

In the meantime he took up veterinarian studies under Walter Clevenger, the old-time Union City barber, under whom George Keltner learned the barbering trade, and eventually bought out.

William DeBolt was married March 21, 1893 to Miss Myrtle Sutton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Sutton of north of the city.

Eight children were born to this union, five of whom are living, namely, Mrs. Ruth Study, Ft. Recovery, O., William, Paul and Ralph DeBolt, of Vallejo, Calif., and Donald DeBolt, of Sunnyvale, Calif.

A son, Walter, was killed when twelve years of age at Ansonia, O., in 1901, and two daughter died in infancy. There are also eight grandchildren, who besides the widow, survive Mr. DeBolt.

Shortly after his marriage Mr. DeBolt entered the great veterinary college at Ontario, Canada, from which he graduated with high honors. He entered the practice of his newly acquired profession at Ansonia, O., and he enjoyed great success from the beginning.

Then for some reason which never became known he gave up the practice of his profession and went back to work at the Backstay Welt factory.

He was a genial, pleasant man, thoroughly honest and had many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved widow and children.

Funeral announcements will be made later.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, October 4, 1934

Called Home. - Lewis Wooters, one of Union City's most highly respected citizens is dead. - Had lived practically all his life in this city.

In the death of Lewis Wooters, 82, at his home on Chatham street last night, Union City loses one of it oldest and most highly respected citizens. He was born near Selma, Ind. but lived practically all his life in Union City.

He had been ill for many months, and during his active life was a drayman.

He was of a pleasant turn of mind and always had a good word for everyone and he numbered his friends by the legion.

He is survived by his widow, two daughters, Mrs. N. C. Heck of Toledo, O., Mrs. Myrtle Gottschalk, of Wichita, Kan., and two sons, Thomas Wooters of this city, and A. C. Wooters of Ridgeville, Ind., and H. T. Stonerack, a stepson and many grandchildren.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed, but will probably take place Saturday.

[Funeral services were held on Saturday afternoon at the Christian Church, Rev. C. G. McCallister officiated. Interment was made in the Snell Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, October 5, 1934

Saturday. - The funeral rites for Frederick Trittschuh will take place. - Active Democrat, retired farmer and official, dies at Greenville.

Greenville, O., Oct. 5. --- Frederick Trittschuh, 78 years old, a former superintendent of the Darke county infirmary and a prominent retired farmer, died at his home at 603 East Main street following an extended illness. He had been bedfast since last June.

Mr. Trittschuh, a native of Germany, had lived in Darke county since he was 17 years old. His early life was passed in Patterson township, where he engaged in farming endeavors for a quarter of a century. His farm home was near Willowdell and he was an active member of St. Paul Lutheran church in that village.

During his residence in Patterson township he served as a trustee and justice of the peace.

In 1895 he was appointed as a director of the Darke county infirmary and served two terms. Shortly after he retired from the board he was named as superintendent of the home, a position he held for eight years.

Retiring in 1918 he moved to Greenville and entered the employ of the old Greenville Gravel company, now the American Aggregation corporation. He was connected with that firm in a sales capacity for 14 years.

In recognition of his many services to the public, Mr. Trittschuh was appointed as a member of the county board of commissioners at the time of the death of William Wertz in August, 1919. He served on the board until January 1931.

During his entire career he was a staunch member of the Democratic party.

His immediate survivors include five sons, Albert, Indianapolis, Ind.; Laurence, Versailles; Walter, Houston, O.; Louis, Yorkshire, and Ervin, Cincinnati; two daughters, Mrs. Emma Schilling and Mrs. Minnie Althoff, Versailles; 28 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.

Funeral services will be conducted from the home at 1:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon, following which the cortege will leave for St. Paul Lutheran church at Willowdell, where rites are to be conducted at 2:30 o'clock. Burial will be made in Greenlawn cemetery at Versailles.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October 8, 1934

Mother called. - Mrs. James K. Davis passes away after months of illness. - Mother of Dr. G. H. Davis and a life-long resident of city.

Far past the allotted three score and ten years, Mrs. James K. Davis answered her Maker's call Friday night.

She had been ill and most of the time confined to her bed at her home, 319 South State Line street, since last July.

Her condition became critical a few days ago and the spirit took its flight Friday night thirty minutes after ten o'clock.

Mrs. James K. Davis was born April 27, 1856, of pioneer parents, Thomas B. and Katharine (Hardman) Wennrick, and she was the last surviving member of a family of eight children. Her parents came from Pennsylvania among the first pioneers, and settled on a farm located on what became known as The Wenrick Pike, four miles east of Union City.

Here she attended school in the little building that became famous because it was built entirely of walnut timber, in that day and age cheap but built today it would be almost priceless and the timber alone would cost many thousands of dollars. One of the teachers in the school was named Creviston.

The subject of this account then Miss Adaline Wennrick, was married Oct. 28, 1873, to James K. Davis, who with the following children survive: Dr. George H. Davis, Ora M. Davis of Austin, Tex., J. Russell Davis, of Dunkirk, Ind., Mrs. Goldie C. Thokey, Wilbur R. Davis of Austin, Tex., Mrs. Florence Riffle and Robert C. Davis of Dayton. Thomas D. Davis died in Dayton in 1930 and Ruby C. Davis died in Lawrenceburg, Ind., a few years ago. One son, Bertie, died in infancy.

On her marriage she came to Union City, and she resided here the rest of her life.

She was a good, Christian woman, a member of the First Christian church, and she was a faithful wife and noble mother whose life and work was dedicated to her family, yet she was always willing to help others. She was always ready to do her share of woman's work that was to be done and so she did her share toward the upbuilding of the city. She was of a friendly nature and she was beloved by all who knew her and she will be mourned by many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved husband and children.

Besides the above she is survived by twenty-four grandchildren and one grandson.

The funeral services were this (Monday) afternoon from the Christian church conducted by Rev. Charles G. McCallister. Interment in the City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October 8, 1934

Union City. - People in fatal auto accident at Washington, D. C. Saturday. - Rev. Robert E. Pogue was raised in this city; leaving many years ago.

Mrs. M. W. Freisner, Five Points received a telegram Saturday morning stating that the Rev. Robert E. Pogue and wife, of Washington, D. C. had been in an auto accident which resulted in Mrs. Pogue's death. Rev. Pogue was taken to a hospital and had not regained consciousness when the message was sent, the extent of his injuries not being known. Rev. Pogue was a Union City boy and spent many years of his life here. Union City friends will regret to learn of this accident and of the death of his wife who leaves a six year old daughter, Jacquelin. The family visited with relatives about a year ago. After leaving here Rev. Pogue was pastor of an M. E. Church in Lincoln, Neb., for several years, later going to the east.

A message was received this morning stating the Mr. Pogue never regained consciousness and passed away at 9 a. m.

Oct. 22nd Evening Times article --- Russel Pogue and wife of Tippecanoe City, Ohio, were here Sunday as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Freisner of Five Points, and friends.

Russel has just returned from Washington, D. C. where he attended the funeral of his brother, Robert Pogue and wife, who were killed in an auto accident in the city of Washington, D. C. a few days ago. They leave an eight year old daughter, Miss Jacqueline.

Mr. and Mrs. Pogue, who lived at Takoma Park, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, D. C. were in Washington driving on Harrison street, which is a thru street, when suddenly a Ford V-8 sedan car occupied by two of naval commander Robert Smith's daughters, at a high rate of speed crashed into the Essex car driven by Mr. Pogue from 41st street. Both cars were completely broken and a piece of plate glass was driven into the skull of Mrs. Pogue, causing instant death. Mr. Pogue had every rib in his body broken and otherwise injured and he lived from Friday until Monday morning. Miss Demarie Smith, the driver of Smith's car was fatally injured and the other one only suffered minor injuries.

Ora Pogue, was connected as sales manager in the real estate branch of the Union Trust Co. of Washington, D. C. and was an associate pastor of the Emory M. E. Church of that city, from where the funeral took place and interment in Park Creek cemetery.

The responsibility of looking after the affairs of Mr. and Mrs. Pogue, fell upon the shoulders of his brother Russel, who was fortunate in being able to sell immediately the home and most of the furniture and upon the courts orders, the daughter was placed in the care of a close friend of Mr. and Mrs. Pogue.

Mrs. Pogue's parents live in Liverpool, England and she had no relatives in this country. Mr. Pogue carried $7,000. life insurance, and steps are being taken to see that their daughter is provided for comfortably in the future.

Robert Pogue was born and raised in this city and was an employee of the Union City Carriage Co.; later he entered the ministry and was here last April 21st to attend the funeral of his mother.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October, 8, 1934

Well Known. - Was Mahlon O. Evans who died suddenly Saturday morning. - He was the father of Dr. Walter Evans, the dentist.

Mahlon O. Evans, one of the best known farmers in Randolph county passed away at his home 1 1/2 miles north of New Lisbon, sometime between 4 and 6 o'clock Saturday morning. Although Mr. Evans had been under the weather for the past three weeks his going was rather sudden and exact time of his passing is not known. His son-in-law, O. J. Sutton heard the sick man cough at 4 o'clock in the morning and when at 5:30 Mrs. Sutton looked in the room she thought her father was sitting at the edge of the bed. Then at 6 o'clock when she looked in again to ask if he was ready for breakfast she found he had collapsed on the bed. His son, Dr. Walter Evans and a physician were called and an examination disclosed that life had fled.

Mahlon Orio Evans was born Jan. 19, 1858 near Hartford City in Blackford county where he attended school.

After his marriage to Lavina Catherine Shire, he with his young wife moved to the farm north of Lisbon which became his home for the rest of his life. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Evans: Mrs. Daisy Sutton, Dr. Walter Evans and Billie B. who died in February of 1930. The mother preceded the daughter some years ago.

Mahlon Evans was considered one of the best posted farmers in the county and he was always ready with his comical and aid whenever called upon. He lived a Christian life and was a regular attendant at the First Methodist Church in Union City and also at Raper Chapel. The Times joins the many friends in extending sympathy to the sorrowing children.

He was also survived by two grandchildren and one brother, A. L. Evans of Richmond, Ind.

Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday Oct. 9th at the residence at 10 a. m., Rev. Ira Clark officiating. Interment in the City cemetery.

[A later obituary published Oct. 15th gave his name as Malon which is wrong - The name Mahlon is right according to the 1880 Census. He was the son of Benjamin W. and Rebecca Evans. He was married in 1879 to Lovina S. Shire in this account. Also the third child was named Nellie here. A grandson, Acil Sutton preceded him in death. Daisy was married to O. J. Sutton. Both Daisy and Walter resided in Union City. The surviving two grandchildren were Martha and Robert Evans.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October 8, 1934

Died. --- Mrs. John L. Whistler, Saturday Oct. 6th, aged 79 years. The body was returned to the residence at 316 N. State Line St. from the Brooks funeral home Sunday morning. Funeral services will be conducted Monday Oct. 8th at 9:30 a. m. (C. S. T.) at the United Brethren Church, Rev. Ira Clark officiating. Interment in Ithaca Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, October 12, 1934

Lived Here. - Mrs. Anna Wallace dies while on a visit in Winchester. - She was the aunt of Jack, Mary and Bee Wallace.

Mrs. Anna Wallace, 73 years old, died at the Randolph county hospital Wednesday evening at 10:35 o'clock following an operation.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock at the St. Joseph church in charge of Father Michael Shea of Union City. Burial will be in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at Hartford City.

The deceased is survived by two sons, Nicholas L. and Frank W. of Muncie; one daughter, Mrs. Earl McCann of Charlestown, W. Va.; two sisters, Mrs. Kathryn Lafferty and Miss McDonald of Winchester; one niece, Miss Liza Lafferty; 11 grandchildren and one great grandchild.

The deceased was removed to the home of her sister, Miss McDonald, 518 North Main street in Winchester.

Mrs. Anna Wallace was the widow of Michael Wallace and the family formerly lived in Union City. She was the aunt of Jack, Mary and Bee Wallace and she moved away from Union City about twenty years ago. For some years past she had been making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Earl McCann in Charleston, W. Va. She was on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Kathryn Lafferty, and Miss McDonald, when she became ill and though everything possible was done for her the end came as stated above.

Old friends here will regret to learn of her death and they extend sympathy to the surviving relatives.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, October 12, 1934

Sudden Death. - Miss Mary J. Thompson passes away at her home this morning. - Recovered from Ptomaine attack but seemed to be well again.

Mary J. Thompson died very suddenly this morning at 11:15 at her home on West Division street, first door west of the Mundbank grocery. She was in her kitchen preparing dinner when the mother, Mrs. Eliza Thompson and Mrs. Knoll, who were working at a quilt in the front room heard a noise and felt a jar. Hurrying into the kitchen they found Mary Thompson lying on the floor. They called in Mrs. Ira Mundbank, who telephoned for the doctor.

When the latter arrived a few minutes later life was extinct, and the cause of death was heart failure. Some three weeks ago she had an attack of Ptomaine poisoning but she apparently recovered from that attack, and whether or not it had anything to do with the heart attack is not known.

Mary Jane Thompson came to Union City 21 years ago and has resided here since that time. She became one of Union City's foremost beauty specialists and for a number of years conducted a popular beauty parlor. She was a very pleasing personality and always had a smile and pleasant greeting for everybody young and old and her death will be sincerely mourned.

The mother is heart-broken over her daughter's death and near to collapse. Kindly neighbors and friends are caring for the aged mother. Besides the mother she is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Laura E. Lynch [of Darlington, Ind.] and Mrs. D. P. Lewis, also two brothers, John Thompson, Edwards, Wash., and Grover Thompson, of Santa Monica, Calif. The remains were taken to the Fraze funeral home to be prepared for burial

The funeral will take place Sunday at 2 p. m. C. S. T. at the Church of the Brethren conducted by Rev. Ivan Erbaugh. Interment in the Brethren cemetery north of the city.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October 15, 1934

Called Home. - Life's work of Trustee John M. Shockney comes to a close. - Had lived his entire life in Wayne Township.

John M. Shockney, 74, Trustee of Wayne Township, passed away at his home 224 North Howard St., Sunday evening at 7 o'clock, after an illness of several days.

He had lived all his life in Wayne township, securing his boyhood education at the old No. 6 school, after which he attended the Valparaiso University and taught school in what was known as the old Bickel school, south of this city.

He operated a large farm near the Wayne centralized school, and in 1918 was elected Trustee of Wayne township and in 1930 was re-elected, during which time he supervised the operation of his farm.

In politics he was a life-long Democrat, yet of the type that always respected those of his opposite political faith, which accounted for the fact of his being elected Trustee in a strong Republican community.

Mr. Shockney was married twice, his first wife, Sarah (Teeter) Shockney, dying in 1889. His second wife, Effie (Turner) Shockney, survives along with five children: Mrs. Ava Rolland and Mrs. Minnie Marker, both of near here; Guy Shockney, of Greenville, O.; Lee and Theodore, of near here; two step-children, Mrs. Blanche Whitesell and Mrs. Hazel Halderman, of near Union City; one sister, Mrs. Sarah Ann Conner, of Indianapolis; two brothers, O. H. Shockney, of Winchester, and Carl Shockney, of Greenville, O.; twenty-five grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

[Funeral services were conducted from the Christian church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. C. G. McCallister. The burial location was not given. He was the son of Jesse and Ellen (Mitchell) Shockney and was born on the old Shockney homestead southwest of Union City, Oct. 29, 1859. Ava and Guy were children of his first marriage, while the other three were born of the second marriage. A further article published on the 17th names the grandchildren and great grandchildren.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, October 16, 1934

Fall at sewerage disposal plant proves fatal to boy. - Junior Walters dies at 4 o'clock this morning. - Sustains a fractured skull, October 7th.

A mantle of sorrow has settled over the Walter's home on North Plum street, over the death of the youngest member of the family, Theodore Walters, Jr., as a result of an accidental fall Sunday, October 7, into a manhole of the new sewage disposal plant situated near North Plum street, and not far from the Walter's residence as told about in the Times of that time.

This Spring the family which also has a home in Redkey, took up the its residence in that city, and they came over Sunday, Oct. 7, to spend the day at their Plum street home here. In the afternoon about 3:30 Junior with Bobby Hollopeter and Carl Miller, two playmates, started to go west.

Junior Walters climbed the gate near the manhole and when he jumped down he landed near the excavation. The ground at his feet crumbled and the boy plunged down head-foremost a distance, it is said of seventeen feet. The two boys with him tried to get Junior out of his hazardous position but were not strong enough and as Bobby Hollopeter ran to Frank Dunn and Clyde Flory who live near by, and told them about the accident. The two men and boys succeeded in lifting the injured boy from the manhole, and he was taken to the Union City hospital in an ambulance. After receiving medical attention he was taken to his home, 713 North Plum street. He eventually recovered consciousness, though his condition remained serious, and it was known from the beginning that his life hung by a slender thread as his skull was fractured. Yesterday an X-ray was taken and everything known to medical science was resorted to to defeat the inevitable but the Angel of Death never ceased his beckoning and the young spirit took its flight to the realms of eternal sunshine this Tuesday morning at 4 o'clock.

Theodore Walters, Jr., was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Walters, Sr., and he was born at Redkey, Ind., Dec. 4, 1920. With his folks he moved to Union City from Redkey three years ago last April, and for the past two years he attended school in Union City. They resided for two years on South Columbia street, for the past year they have resided in what was known as the Tom Hueber place on North Plum street.

This year Theodore, Jr. reentered the Redkey school and his folks took up their residence in that city in a home which they maintained in that place.

Junior, as he was generally known, was a likable chap, full of the spirit and promise of bright boyhood. He was an enthusiastic basketball player and a favorite with his many friends whom the Times joins in extending heartfelt sympathy to the sorrow-stricken parents and family.

He is survived by the parents, three sisters, Mrs. Lucille Claycomb and Mrs. Rachel Shirley of Redkey, Miss Louise Walters, at home, and two brothers, Robert Walters of Dunkirk, Ind., and Eugene Walters, of Denver, Colo.

The funeral will take place in Redkey on a day to be announced. The remains will be prepared in Redkey for burial and they will arrive at the home here this evening where they will lie until the day of the last sad rites. Burial will be made in the Redkey cemetery.

[Funeral services were held on Friday at the Redkey Nazarene Church. Rev. D. A. Glaze officiated and interment was made in the Redkey Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, October 17, 1934

Mrs. P. E. Goodrich dies at Winchester.

Winchester, Ind. --- Mrs. Susie (Engle) Goodrich, 71, wife of Percy E. Goodrich and prominent Winchester resident, died last evening at the family home on East Franklin street here, following an extended illness. She was a sister-in-law of former Governor James P. Goodrich.

Besides the husband, she is survived by three sisters, Miss Edna Engle and Miss Ethel Engle, both of here, and Mrs. Robert A. Mills, of Fort Wayne. She was a member of women's clubs here and of the Presbyterian Church.

The body was taken to the Clark, Maynard and Potter funeral parlors and will be removed to the home tomorrow. Funeral arrangements will be made Wednesday.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, October 23, 1934

Life's Work - is ended for Perry Coddington who died this morning. - At the Masonic Home at Franklin, Ind. where he had been for six years.

D. Perry Coddington, 88, passed away this morning at the Masonic Home at Franklin, Ind. Mr. Coddington was a life-long resident of this city and the son of the late Ezra Coddington and wife and is the last of that family.

He was a carpenter by trade and a skilled violin musician and a life-long member of the Turpen Masonic lodge. About six years ago he entered the Masonic home at Franklin, Ind., where he has remained until his death.

A no finer and more highly respected citizen ever lived in our city than Perry Coddington, who was honest, God fearing and the type of citizen who made friends and had the happy faculty to hold them.

The remains were brought to the Fraze Funeral Home in this city today, from where the funeral services under the auspices of the Masonic lodge and Rev. J. A. Watson will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment in the Conklin cemetery. [Funeral Home reported that he was 87 years old.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, October 26, 1934

Mrs. H. Jellison dies.

Mrs. Harvey Jellison passed away at her home this morning in Portland, Ind. She was the daughter of the late William J. Turner and was born and raised in Wayne township and was a resident of this city for a number of years, and was a sister of the late John and Cyrus Turner.

The funeral will take place Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Baird Funeral home in Portland, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October 29, 1934

Postmaster. - Charles Price passes away at his home in Saratoga, Ind. - Was a former resident of Union City and a highly respected citizen.

In the death of Charles Price, 73, Saturday evening, who for the past 16 years has been the efficient and courteous postmaster at Saratoga, Ind., this county loses one of its most prominent citizens, and a life long Democrat in politics.

He was born in Preble County, O., and later moved to Union City where he made his home until 1915 when he moved to Saratoga, where he made his home.

The remains were brought to the Fraze funeral home in this city and prepared for burial which will take place from the U. B. church in this city Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Ira Clark and Rev. Harry Berry of Saratoga. Interment in the Union City cemetery.

He was survived by a daughter, Mrs. Perry Bell, of Saratoga; four sons, William E. Price, Muncie business man, and former prominent Union City resident; Joseph A. Price, of McConnell, N. C.; Harry Price, of Logansport; and Wilbur Price, of Union City; two brothers, Andrew of Rossburg, O., and Peter, of near Rose Hill; four sisters, Mrs. Emma Mercer, of Otsego, Michigan; Mrs. Elizabeth Pierson, of Greenville, O.; Mrs. J. W. Trump, of Crewe, Virginia; and Mrs. Salome Williams, of Lewisburg, O.

[Later it was reported that he was 72 years old and the funeral services were held at the U. B. church in Saratoga.]

[Excerpts from Obituary published Nov. 6th. -- He was the oldest son of William and Delilah Price, born in Preble Co., OH, May 17, 1862. On August 29, 1883 he was married to Martha Jane McKee, also of Preble Co. To this union were born five children (all named above). He was also survived by five grandchildren and one great grandchild.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October 29, 1934

End Comes. - Hezekiah Fowler's life work is ended. - Was one of this community's most highly respected citizens.

Hezekiah Fowler, 81, passed away at his home at Markle Friday and the funeral took place from the home of his son, Edward Fowler on South State Line road this afternoon, conducted by Rev. C. G. McCallister. Interment in the Union City cemetery.

He was one of the community's oldest and most highly respected citizens and was born and raised in this community.

He is survived in addition to the son, by four daughters: Gertrude and Mildred, teachers, Youngstown, Ohio; Agnes, teacher, Oxford, Ohio; and Mrs. J. W. Huffner, near Ossian, Ind.; two grandchildren; four brothers, W. W., J. L. and Edward of Union City and B. F. of Preston, Minn.

Obituary, Oct. 29. --- Hezekiah Fowler, son of Hanson T. and Sarah (Livengood) Fowler, was born at the Fowler farm home on June 10th, 1853, and died at the home of his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Huffner, October 26, 1934, aged 81 years, 4 months and 16 days.

His education was acquired at what was then known as the Parent District School and at the Union City, Ohio High School. When a young man he taught several terms in the rural schools of Darke County.

After his marriage to Miss Margaret J. Wilson he took up farming for his occupation and in time, by his industry and good management became the owner of a farm. Later the family moved to Union City so that the children could have the advantage of our splendid high schools. All of them completed the high school work, graduated and became teachers. Then the farm was sold and Hez, as he was sometimes called, indulged in a well earned rest coupled with a travel program. He spent several years in California enjoying the well-nigh matchless climate and marvelous natural scenery. The chief attractions of nearby states were also visited and added to the delight of one who quickly became a seasoned traveler. Later some winters were passed in South Texas and others in Florida where he escaped the sting of winter's frigid winds. The infirmities of advancing years brought his travels to an end and the last few years were spent in the home of his daughter and her husband, Mrs. and Mrs. J. W. Huffner. They cared for him and ministered to his needs in a very commendable manner - Mrs. Huffner being a truly dutiful daughter.

Death came painlessly - in such a manner as anyone might wish. Surviving are four daughters, Gertrude and Mildred, teachers, Youngstown, Ohio; Agnes, teacher, Oxford, Ohio; and Mrs. J. W. Huffner, near Ossian, Ind.; two grandchildren; four brothers, W. W., J. L. and Edward of Union City and B. F. of Preston, Minn.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, October 29, 1934

Auto Crash. - Which took place near Modoc causes death of man. - Couple were enroute to Lynn, Ind. to visit friends.

Muncie, Ind. --- Stanley Reddich, 26, of 3128 Broadway street, Indianapolis, was fatally injured and Miss Helen Bradley, also of Indianapolis, was severely hurt this afternoon, when their automobile went out of control and struck a telephone pole, about two miles west of here on state road 36. He died while being taken to the Randolph County Hospital, by Dr. and Mrs. F. E. Purley, who found the couple and summoned aid.

Miss Bradley was badly injured about her back and sustained several cuts. She is a patient in the Winchester Hospital and is expected to recover. She was conscious when found. Both were thrown clear of the car.

The couple was en route to Lynn to spend the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Harman, and Miss Bradley was driving. The car struck a bad bump in the gravel road and when she jammed on the brakes, the car went out of control, striking a culvert and plunging into a telephone pole.

The body of Mr. Reddich was returned to the Reynard funeral parlor here and will be taken to Indianapolis tomorrow.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, October 30, 1934

Passes Away. - Miss Mary Brown, formerly of this city, is dead. - Was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Brown.

Word has come to this city of the death of Miss Mary Ellen Brown, 21, who died Monday morning in the Ft. Wayne hospital following a year's illness.

She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Brown, of Dunkirk, Ind. who formerly lived in Union City and was a telegraph operator on the Pennsylvania railroad and is a cousin of Mrs. Frank J. Hazelmire, and is well-known in Union City, where she has visited upon several occasions, and is survived besides her father and mother, by a brother, John, at home, and a sister, Mrs. Martha Strauff, of Chicago. Miss Brown was an accomplished pianist, having been graduated from the Muncie Conservatory of Music and later at Chicago. Funeral services will be conducted at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Dunkirk, Ind. by Father Derrick at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning. Burial will be made in the I. O. O. F. cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, November 5, 1934

Joins Husband. - Mrs. Peter Kuntz, Sr., passes away at Dayton, O. - Noted for her club, church and charity work. - She received her childhood education in Union City.

Dayton, O. --- Mrs. Peter Kuntz, Sr., 75 year old, widow of the pioneer lumber dealer, died Friday night at her residence, 201 Southview avenue, Oakwood, after an illness of several weeks.

Although a member of several women's clubs and charitable organizations, Mrs. Kuntz took greatest pride in raising a family of six sons and 3 daughters, all of the sons being associated at the present time in developing the lumber business which their father started. One other son, Martin James Kuntz, is dead.

Mrs. Kuntz, the former Miss Mary Higi, was born at Hamilton, O., December 16, 1858. She received her early education in this city and completed her studies at Union City, Ind. when her family moved while she was a young girl.

She was married to Peter Kuntz, Sr. at Union City, September 9, 1879. Mr. Kuntz was just starting his career at that time at Greenville and Union City and Mrs. Kuntz did much to encourage him in the early years of the business.

They moved to Dayton in 1889 and it was at that time, that Mr. Kuntz started expanding his lumber holdings, acquiring plants in other localities.

As the sons grew to manhood, each was introduced into the business which continued to grow even after the father's death, March 3, 1918, until the company, still known as the Peter Kuntz company, now has 8 plants throughout Ohio and Indiana.

The surviving sons are Peter, Martin C., William, Edward and Richard Kuntz, all of Dayton, and John J. Kuntz, the second oldest, who lives in San Antonio, Tex.

The daughters are Mrs. [Mary J.] J. W. McLean of Philadelphia, Pa., Mrs. [Clara Grace] Carl Graves of Dayton and Mrs. [Elizabeth] John Wickham of Springfield, O. Other survivors are three sisters, two brothers, 24 grandchildren.

The sisters are: Miss Clara Higi and Miss Isabel Higi, of this city, residing on the continuation of Plum street, north of the city. Two brothers, Joe Higi, of Muncie, and Steben Higi, at Connersville, also formerly resided here.

The funeral services will take place at 10 o'clock E. S. T. Tuesday morning at the Holy Angel Church. [The burial was made in Calvary Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, November 6, 1934

Old Resident. - Mrs. Isabella (Fowler) Alberry dies at Covington, Ohio. - She was born at the old tollgate on South State Line Road.

Edward Fowler received the word of the death of his cousin, Mrs. Isabel (Fowler) Alberry, who died at her home in Covington, O., Sunday night, aged 81 years.

Mrs. Alberry was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hezekiah Fowler, and she was born on the old home place on South State Line, where there was formerly a tollgate, and the old home and tollgate have long since disappeared.

The tollgate was in charge of Mrs. Alberry's mother, and as a girl Mrs. Alberry helped to tend the tollgate, collecting the toll and raising and lowering the long pole which barred the way until the toll was paid.

There are many people living who remember paying toll at this tollgate and also at a tollgate on the Jackson pike at Haysville, which was in operation at the same time as the State Line tollgate.

Mrs. Alberry is survived by one son, Richard Alberry, of Covington.

The funeral will take place this (Tuesday) afternoon at 2:30 from the family home in Covington, O

[She is in the 1880 Census living in Miami Co., OH, with her husband Richard Alberry. Here her name is given as Hannah J. but other sources say the middle initial should be an "I" for Isabelle. The census says she was born 1853 in IN, with a son Richard listed as the youngest child. See obit for Hezekiah Fowler published Oct. 29, 1934 - relative? ]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, November 7, 1934

Dropped Dead. - Mrs. S. D. Smith dies very suddenly at her home this morning. - In apparently good health up to the time of the attack.

Seldom has this city experienced such a shock as was caused this morning when the news came up today that Mrs. S. D. Smith was dead at her home, 606 North Howard street.

Yesterday she was in apparently good health and in fact came up town on one of her regular daily visits. Even this morning there were no preliminary alarming symptoms. To her sister-in-law, Mrs. Ella Smith, she stated that she wasn't feeling well and the next moment she collapsed while in her room. When they reached her side, life had fled.

Mrs. Smith who was the wife of the well known Dr. Samuel D. Smith, well known dentist, was formerly Miss. Irene Belle Murphy, and she was Union City's most prominent club member and social leaders and her death will take one whom our social and religious world could ill afford to lose, and her going will be an irreparable loss.

The loss falls hardest of course upon the stricken husband who himself has been confined to a bed of illness for the past six months and the heart of the community goes out to him in his great sorrow and loss.

The Times will carry further particulars in a later issue.

[Funeral services were conducted on Friday afternoon at the Smith residence, officiated by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier. Interment was made in the Union City cemetery. Due to the illness of Mr. Smith the funeral services were private.]

[An account on the probate of her Will was published in the Dec. 10th newspaper. Mentioned besides the husband were Gertrude Murphy and Ada Beck; her brothers, B. F. Murphy and E. W. Murphy, and the children of a deceased sister, Amy Wilkerson.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, November 8, 1934

Injured. - Sustained in auto accident causes death of Harry and Bernard Keister. - Their sister passed away four weeks ago suddenly.

The many friends of Harry Keister, of 1901 North Delaware street, Indianapolis, Ind., in Union City, where he was born on January 3, 1885, where he attended our public schools and was for years a clerk in the old Turpen Bros. Grocery, will regret to learn that he and his brother, Bernard Keister, were killed in an auto accident.

Harry died Tuesday in the Methodist hospital in Indianapolis, Ind. Harry was employed in the floor covering business for the past twenty-eight years and visited Union City frequently. He was a member of the Masonic lodge and Elks lodge. His sister, Mrs. Alta Anacker, of Indianapolis, Ind., died suddenly four weeks ago and the only survivor of the family is Leroy Keister, of Indianapolis, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, November 9, 1934

Died --- Mrs. Florence Doherty, 76, passed away at the home of her daughter Mrs. Eugene Tobin, south of this city. She is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Pearl Wright of Ft. Wayne; Mrs. Alice Mills and Miss Fern Doherty of Camden, Ind., and Mrs. Eugene Tobin. Her sister Mrs. Olga Schlecty of Saratoga survives. The body will be returned to the home of the daughter on Saturday evening. Funeral services will be conducted Sunday, Nov. 11th at the Pleasant Hill Church north of the city at 2 p. m., conducted by Rev. Thos. A. Watson. Interment will be in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, November 9, 1934

Laid to rest. - In City Cemetery after beautiful life of rarest service and devotion. - Impressive services held for Miss Ona M. Lenich at her home.

Simple but very impressive funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon for Miss Ona M. Lenich at the home on Pearl street in the presence of a large company of relatives, neighbors, and friends. Many beautiful flora tributes from organizations and individuals filled the room with their fragrance. Rev. C. G. McCallister of the Christian Church offered prayer, read portions of Scripture, poems, and delivered a brief appropriate discourse. The two favorite hymns of Miss Lenich, "Old Rugged Cross: and "Abide With Me" were heard during the services. At the close the procession moved to the City Cemetery where with neighbors acting as pallbearers, and with the words of Tenneyson's "Crossing the Bar" as a blessed benediction, the loved one was tenderly laid to rest beside her father and mother in whom she had so gently ministered in their last days.

Among the relatives from a distance attending the services were: Mr. and Mrs. Russel Medscar and Mrs. Bina Bayman of Cincinnati; Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Gardner, and Mrs. Clara Holloway, of Piqua, O.; Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Collins, of Muncie, Ind.; Mrs. Opal Huddle of Greenville, O.

Ona Lenich lived almost all of her simple, quiet life in Union City. She graduated from the West Side High School, then attended the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute. She graduated as a nurse from the Cincinnati General Hospital, and followed with success the profession of nursing until her mother's health declined. Giving up her profession, she returned to her home where she cared most tenderly and faithfully for her mother and father during their remaining years. Hers was a beautiful life of service and sacrifice whose memory will ever remain in the hearts of all who knew her.

She was a member of the Christian Church, the Olive Branch Bible Club, and the D. F. O. Sunday school class. She was actively interested in religious and charitable work, and faced her greatest joy in serving others in a modest humble way. She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Gertrude Bundy, of Harlingen, Texas; one brother, L. Ray Lenich, of Union City; other relatives, and a multitude of warm, true friends.

[She graduated from U. C. West Side High School in 1897. She is found in the 1880 Census as the daughter of John and Lizzie C. Lanich, York Twp., Darke Co., OH. She was born in Ohio.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, November 9, 1934

Joins Sister. - Vera Irene Smiley passes away at her home near North Salem. - Was a victim of pneumonia; funeral Saturday afternoon.

A sad death took place at the William F. Smiley home, three-fourth mile south of North Salem, Thursday morning at 5:30 o'clock, when their little twin daughter, Vera Irene passed away after a week's illness of pneumonia.

She was born Nov. 8, 1933 and was an exceptionally bight and lovable child and as stated contracted a heavy cold a few days ago, which developed into pneumonia which caused her demise.

Besides her parents she is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Dortha May, William Floyd, Virginia Catherine, Mavene Louella. Two sisters, including her twin sister Verli Ilene are deceased.

Her surviving grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Hack Smiley and Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Amspaugh.

The funeral arrangements are in charge of the Melson R. Williamson & Son of Portland, Ind., and will take place from the home, Saturday, Nov. 10th, at 2:00 p. m., conducted by Rev. John Watson. Interment in the Teagarden cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, November 12, 1934

Called Home. - Mrs. Peter Kaucher passes away after a long illness. - She was a member of the Methodist church for over fifty years.

After a long and useful life Mrs. Peter Kaucher closed her eyes in sleep that knows no wakening at ten minutes after 12 o'clock Saturday morning.

Mrs. Kaucher had been a semi-invalid for seven years and she bore her affliction with the fortitude and patience of the true Christian woman.

Mrs. Kaucher was the daughter of Samuel and Lucreta Stephens. Her maiden name was Miss Esther A. Stephens and she was born near Raper Chapel, O., June 28, 1863. She attended school in that district and December 15, 1881 she was married to Peter Kaucher when she moved to Union City. At that time she also joined the Methodist Church and in all the years to follow she attended meetings regularly until failing health interfered.

During her years of activity she did her full share as a member of the Women's Home and Foreign Missions and also the Ladies Aid society. She was not only a devout church member but a true Christian in all that that word implies. She never spoke evil of anyone but always had a good word for her fellow beings. She lived for her family and her church and when able she was always willing to help in any good cause.

She was the mother of two daughters and five sons as follows: Harry Kaucher, Mason, O.; Perry, Elmer, Clifford and Joe Kaucher, Union City; Mrs. Ira Anders, Union City. One daughter Esther, 21, preceded her to the home above Dec. 9, 1925 and the mother never fully recovered from the shock caused by the death of the beloved daughter.

With her quiet modest ways Mrs. Kaucher made many friends who will sincerely mourn her death and whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved husband who is himself recovering from a long illness and other relatives.

Besides the above she is survived by six grandchildren and five half-brothers as follows: Wesley Beam, Joe Beam and Harvey Beam, living east of the city, Russell Beam, of Greenville, and Frank Beam of Tippecanoe City, O.

The funeral was held this Monday morning at 10 o'clock from the Methodist church conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier. Interment in the City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, November 12, 1934

Passed On. - George Wilkerson, well known carpenter, died this morning. - Ill two years and had lived here since he was a young boy.

George Wilkerson, a well known carpenter and contractor of this community, died at his home, 336 Carter street, this Monday morning, at half past two o'clock, after an illness covering a period of two years, during which there were times when he seemed to be recovering. Three weeks ago his condition became alarming and while he made a brave fight he was unable to rally and the end came as stated.

George Francis Wilkerson was born in Mercer County, Sept. 25, 1857, and he was therefore seventy-seven years old at the time of death. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wilkerson and they moved to South Salem on a farm, west of the crossroads, when George F. was a small child. He attended his district school, and fifty-three years ago he was married to Mary Bennett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Bennett, of south of Union City, and who survives her husband.

The following children were born to them: Mrs. R. S. Wenger, Mrs. Verna Bugher, of Union City; Mrs. Flaud Hart, Wakeeney, Kans.; one daughter, Mrs. Ona Stiver, died many years ago.

George Wilkerson followed farming for some years, in which he was industrious and successful. He was also a carpenter and contractor and for a number of years until his health failed him he was always employed for he was a good mechanic, honest and reliable. He moved to Union City twelve years ago from South Salem.

He was also a musician and at one time was the leader of the South Salem band. He was an earnest man, who took life seriously, yet he was of a pleasant disposition, and he will be mourned by many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved widow and children.

Besides the above he is survived by seventeen grandchildren and fifteen great grandchildren.

Funeral announcements later

[A later announcement stated that he was 72 years old. The funeral was held at the Brooks Funeral Home Wednesday at 2 p. m., Rev. C. G. McCallister officiating. Interment was made in the Union City Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, November 13, 1934

Stroke Fatal. - William H. Holdeman succumbs after an attack of paralysis. - Manager of Pierce Elevator in Harrisville nearly a half century.

William H. Holdeman, an account of whose attack of paralysis two weeks ago appeared in the Times, died as a result of the stroke Sunday, Nov. 11 at 9 p. m. at his home in Harrisville.

Mr. Holdeman has been the manager of the Pierce Grain Elevator for nearly a half century having been connected with that busy place for 46 years., during which time by his unfailing courtesy, good nature and absolute honesty he helped to build up a fine business for the well known Harrisville Elevator. Also he made many friends who will sincerely mourn his death.

William H. Holdeman was the son of David and Esther (Pickett) Holdeman and he was born at the family home north of Winchester July 17, 1862. He attended the Lost School in his district and he was married to Margaret Coats at Harrisville Oct. 9, 1886. Four children were born to them: Mrs. Bertha Phillips and Hal Holdeman, both deceased. Two daughters died in infancy. Lester is the only child living and besides Mrs. Holdeman there are three grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Also one brother, Charles Holdeman of Winchester.

He was a member of the Harrisville church and also belonged to the Masonic and K. G. E. lodges.

He lived all of his life in Randolph county.

He was very active in church work and for 15 years he served as superintendent of the Sunday school and for over 30 years he was the church treasurer.

He was a real neighbor and his death will be a great loss to his community.

The funeral services will be held in the Harrisville church Wednesday at 2 p. m. conducted by the Rev. John Watson and Rev. Arrick. Interment will be made in the Jericho cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, November 13, 1934

Greenville boy, age 12, is killed.

Greenville, O. --- Carlos Roeber, 12, was killed Saturday morning at the Beisner farm near this city when a door was blown from a tobacco shed striking him on the head. The boy's neck was broken.

Young Roeber was a ward of the Wernle Orphans home, Richmond, Ind. and for the last three months had been making his home with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Beisner, two and one-half miles east of this city.

Coroner Raymond Marker investigated. He found that the boy's neck had been fractured.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, November 13, 1934

Suicide. - Geo. Plessinger, 75, found dead at his home. - Shot himself with a revolver while despondent.

Greenville, O. --- Worry over failing health is believed to have motivated the suicide of George Allen Plessenger, 78 years old, a retired farmer, who killed himself with a .32-caliber revolver at his home in the village of Dawn shortly before 12 o'clock noon yesterday.

According to Coroner Raymond J. Marker, Plessinger held the gun in his mouth and pulled the trigger. The charge came out at the rear of the head just above the base of the brain.

Death was instantaneous, the coroner's report stated.

Plessinger's dead body was discovered by his widow, who had been visiting with neighbors. She left home at about 11:15 a. m. and returned at 12 o'clock.

The suicidal act was perpetrated in a sleeping room where the body was found slumped over a small bed.

Coroner Marker states that relatives informed him that Plessinger had been in constant dread of a heart attack and that the worry had increased during recent weeks.

Besides the widow, the deceased leaves two children, a son and a daughter. The son, Ira, lives in Montana, while the daughter, Mrs. Harve Powell, is a Greenville resident.

Funeral services are to be conducted from the late residence at 2 p. m. today with interment being made in the Greenville cemetery.

The remains have been removed to the Fisher mortuary at Ansonia.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home records state that George Allen Plessinger was born Oct. 17, 1856 in Richland Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of George Plessinger and Mary Hartzel. His spouse was the former Katarina Johns.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, November 16, 1934

Injuries. - Sustained by Darke County boy proves fatal. - Paul Bromagen, hit by auto dies at hospital of Fractured skull.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Paul Bromagen, six year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Bromagen, living three miles north of here, was fatally injured about 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon when he was struck by a car driven by Walter Riegel, Ansonia, rural route.

The boy died of a fractured skull in the Greenville Hospital last night at 7:30 o'clock. He was on route home from the Lenamood school when the accident occurred on the Fort Recovery Road, two miles north of Greenville.

Survivors include the parents; one brother and two sisters, both at home. Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed. It was reported that investigating officers absolved Riegel from blame in the mishap.

[Miller Funeral Home records state that Paul Leroy Bromagen was born April 8, 1928 in Washington Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of Roy Herman Bromagen and Edna Sullenbarger. He was buried on Sunday, November 18th in the Teegarden Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, November 21, 1934

Suicide. - Woman's body is found by her son in Greenville, O. - Mrs. Iola McFarland commits suicide by hanging.

Greenville, O. --- Mrs. Iola McFarland, 78, committed suicide early Monday morning by hanging herself at the home of her son, Raymond, 448 Harrison avenue, where she had made her home in recent years.

Mrs. McFarland's body was found by her son hanging from a rafter in the attic. Coroner R. L. Marker investigated. Suicide is believed to have been the result of worry over continued ill health.

Mrs. McFarland was the widow of the late Albert McFarland, who was engaged in the implement business in this city for many years. She is survived by two sons and a daughter: Raymond, of this city; Lee, of Chicago, and Mrs. Elmer Collins of Farhaven. She also leaves a brother, Hamilton Robison, of Dayton and a sister, Mrs. Joseph Quinn, of Gettysburg.

Funeral services will be held at the residence of the son, Raymond, Wednesday at 2 p. m. Burial in the Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, November 21, 1934

Auto Crash. - Causes one death and two injured near Farmland, Ind. - Family were enroute to religious services when accident occurred.

Farmland, Ind. --- One man was killed and his wife and son were seriously injured in an automobile accident near here last night, when the family was en route to religious services.

William Leo Huffman, 38, of five miles north of Farmland, died instantly, his head crushed beneath the car. His wife and 14 year old son, Richard, were taken to the Randolph County Hospital in Winchester.

The boy, his skull fractured, was said to be in a critical condition, while Mrs. Huffman remained only partially conscious.

The accident occurred about 7 p. m. at a crossroads near Shedville, four miles southeast of here. As Mr. Huffman drove north across the intersection, the rear wheel was struck by an automobile driven by Ruby Ross, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ross, of Winchester.

Young Ross and his companion, Miss Rosemary Helms, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Troy Helms, of Winchester, escaped with only minor injuries.

The Huffman car cavorted across a ditch and turned over, Mr. Huffman being pinned under the car. Acting Coroner, O. E. Curret, a Farmland physician, and Sheriff Charles Leavell, of Winchester, investigated. Ross was not held. The body of Mr. Huffman was taken to the Thornburg Mortuary here, pending completion of funeral arrangements.

The members of the Huffman family were to have sung at an evangelistic program at 7:30 p. m,.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, November 23, 1934

Died. --- John H. Savoy, at his home one mile north and one-half mile east of Buck's Corner at 6 a. m. Friday, age 90 years. Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p. m. at Pleasant Valley church, Rev. Chas. Stocksdale officiating. Interment in the Brethren Cemetery one mile north of the City. The Brooks Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, November 26, 1934

Hunter. - Was killed accidentally near Portland, Ind. Saturday. - Lewis O. Uptgraft, victim of his own shotgun.

Portland, Ind., Nov. 26. --- Lewis O. Uptgraft, 20, of near here, accidentally shot and killed himself with a shotgun while hunting near here Saturday. He was climbing a fence when his gun discharged and the charge struck him in the chest, piercing his heart.

He was hunting in Jackson Township with his father, Ernest Uptgraft. They were about four miles from their home and were leaving the field when the accident occurred. The youth died almost instantly.

Funeral services will be at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Bryant Methodist Protestant Church with the Rev. Len Bryan officiating. Burial will be in Gravel Hill Cemetery. Surviving are the parents and four sisters, Doreen, Mildred, Nellie and Dona, all at home.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, November 28, 1934

Called Home. - Mrs. N. P. Pangborn is summoned to her reward after long illness. - She was for many years prominent in church and social circles.

After a lone useful and beautiful life, Mrs. Noah P. Pangborn closed her tired eyes last night in eternal rest. She became ill Nov. 4, 1933 and since that time she has been an invalid. Last Sunday night she arose from her bed at the residence of Mrs. S. D. Hartman on West Pearl street where she was making her home and shortly after arising she fell. No apparent injury followed the fall, but the shock was great and no doubt hastened the end. However, this morning early she seemed to rally and ate her breakfast. Later about 7:30 this Wednesday morning Opal Hartman went to her patients room and found that the sands of life had run out and Mrs. Pangborn had passed to her reward.

Mrs. Clara Ann (Ristine) Pangborn was born in Eastern Pennsylvania, July 10, 1854 and therefore she was 80 years of age. She was the daughter of Daniel and Susannah (Billow) Ristine and when she was a young girl her parents moved to a farm near Leesville, Ohio, not far from Galion. She attended school in Pennsylvania and Jan. 20, 1874 she was married to Noah Porter Pangborn, a railroad conductor and for years one of Union City's best known citizens. He died April 23, 1917.

Three children were born to this union, one son Porter Pangborn of Portland, Ore., and two children died in infancy. The son is an invalid and will not be able to come for his mother's funeral.

Mr. and Mrs. Pangborn came to Union City to reside over 40 years ago and later they moved to Indianapolis. On the death of her husband Mrs. Pangborn moved back to Union City and made her home with her sisters, Mrs. Lulu (Ristine) Hanlin. When Mrs. Hanlin became ill, Mrs. Bangborn went to the Huffman home to reside. Also for five years she resided with Mr. and Mrs. I. Murray.

Mrs. Pangborn was a splendid Christian woman and a devout and as her health permitted a very active and life-long member of the Presbyterian church. She was also a valued member of the Ladies Aid society and the Women's Missionary society.

Her life was largely devoted to her church and Sunday school and she was one of the most regular attendants at all services of the church. Even when ill she would still present herself at her beloved church services and quite recently while in attendance at church she was overcome with her illness and had to be taken home. Yet she bore her misfortunes patiently and always met you with a smile.

Mrs. Pangborn was also a valued member of the Adas club, one of the oldest social organizations in the city.

When in health and before her period of illness set in she was always ready to comfort others in their troubles and when ill fortune overtook them and so she had many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved sisters, Mrs. Hanlin and Mrs. Jane Spaulding of Ridgewood, N. J., in the loss of their dear sister.

Besides the above she is survived by several nieces and nephews including Mrs. Laverna (Case) Bennett, of Pittsburgh, Pa., and Nephews, Eugene R. Spaulding of Ridgewood, N. J.; Harold T. Spaulding of St. Petersburg, Fla., and George Case of Port Arthur, Canada.

Funeral announcements will be made later.

[Funeral services were held on Friday, Nov. 30th at the Morris Funeral Home. Rev. H. C. Johnson, assisted by Rev. Dudley Wilson, conducted the brief services. The funeral cortege then left for Indianapolis where according to her request the body was cremated and the ashes sent to Portland, Ore. There they will lie in repose beside those of her husband, Porter Pangborn. The only son resided in Portland but could not attend the funeral since he is an invalid]

[She was born in York County, Pennsylvania.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, November 30, 1934

Woman dies when windpipe is torn by chicken bone.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Mrs. Luella Eubanks, 61 years old, died at her home at Gordon, Wednesday morning, from the effects of a punctured windpipe, caused by a small chicken bone she swallowed late Sunday.

To prevent strangulation an emergency operation was performed and the bone removed, but the surgeon discovered that the windpipe had been torn.

Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p. m. Friday at the Gordon Methodist Episcopal Church, Rev. C. C. Cramer officiating. Burial will be in the Ithaca Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, December 3, 1934

Called Home. - Mrs. Rebecca Detrow passes away at home of her daughter Mrs. James Snyder. - Was a true Christian woman and universally loved and respected.

Mrs. Rebecca Detrow, 87, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. James Snyder, 418 West Pearl St., Saturday morning and the remains were removed to her home in Hartford City, Ind., where the funeral services will be held Tuesday at 2 p. m.

Mrs. Detrow had been ill for over a year and was visiting her daughter, Mrs. James Snyder in this city, when the end came. She was a life-long member of the Baptist church and was a true Christian woman.

She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. James Snyder, Mrs. Vern Stapleton, of Ft. Wayne, Ind., and Mrs. August Schroeder of Allendale, Ill., and two sons, James and Lloyd Detrow of Hartford City, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, December 3, 1934

Died. --- Word was received in this city Saturday of the death of Mrs. Walter Welch at Chattanooga, Tenn. She was the mother of Mrs. W. P. Lockwood, formerly of this city. The post office address of the new home of the Lockwood family is now Manchester, Missouri.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, December 4, 1934

Died. --- Monday afternoon Charles Snell, received a message stating that Harry E. Moorman, 67, formerly of this city had died at his home at Huntington Park, California from heart trouble. Mr. Moorman formerly lived in this city and was back home two years ago; he was a brother of Mrs. Roll Turpin and last Summer Charles Snell visited with him in California.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, December 10, 1934

Born Here. - David Deem dies in Stark, Kansas after short illness. - He was a native of Union City and a brother of Mrs. Anna Reynard.

News was received here from Stark, Kan., Friday night of the death in that city of David Deem, brother of Mrs. Anna Reynard and Miss Eleanor Deem, of St. Paul, Minn. He was only ill a few days and death was caused by an attack of the heart.

David Deem was a native of Union City being born here Jan. 12, 1863. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Finley Deem.

He attended school in this city and on the completion of his school studies he was for a time employed in the Times office at that time located in a frame building on the site now occupied by the Dr. S. W. Reid, brick building.

He resigned his place at the Times office to enter the University of Pennsylvania where he took the course of pharmacist.

After his graduation he went to Kansas City, Mo. where he accepted a position as pharmacist. From there he went to Stark, Kan. where he bought a drug store and he was very successful in business.

In 1896 he was married to Miss Anna Kerr, who survives him.

He has visited back in the old home town on a number of occasions and he always said that Union City always seemed like home to him.

He was a good citizen and there are still a few of his boyhood friends living here who will regret to learn of his passing.

The funeral took place today in the city of his adoption.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, December 10, 1934

Mrs. Lydia Gray Dies.

Lynn, Ind. --- Mrs. Lydia Gray, 70 years old, died at 5 o'clock Saturday morning at the Randolph County Infirmary. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Dee Sailor, of Palestine, O. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Thomas Funeral Home with Rev. Ira Johnson in charge. Burial was made in Quaker Lynn Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, December 11, 1934

Two men killed in Ohio as train smashes truck.

Greenville, O. --- R. B. Patterson, 37, of Birmingham, Ala., and Holman Davis, 54, of Greensburg, Ind., were instantly killed when the truck in which they were riding was struck by a Pennsylvania train at a crossing three miles northeast of here Monday.

Patterson was hurled into a ditch along the tracks and Davis' body was found in the truck wreckage. Davis was identified through letters found in his clothing.

The two men were en route from Tell City, Ala., to Versailles, O., with a load of overall material.

[Holman Davis was later identified as a hitch-hiker picked up by the trucker in Greensburg.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, December 12, 1934

Lived Here. - W. F. Le Fevre passes away at home in DeWitt, Iowa. - He formerly resided south of this city; son of Samuel Le Fevre.

Word came from DeWitt, Iowa, of the death of Washington Franklin Le Fevre, formerly a resident of this city, who was brought up south of the city. He was a son of Samuel and Kathryn Le Fevre. He was a brother of Dr. H. H. Le Fevre, deceased, and he left here as a young man and settled in DeWitt where he was married and lived the rest of his life. He is survived by one brother, I. F. Le Fevre, of Dayton, one sister, Mrs. Mary Frazier, of Denver, Colo., and several nephews and nieces including Romney Le Fevre, and Don Frazier, of this city.

Mrs. W. F. Le Fevre died about ten years ago. Mr. Le Fevre was known here by the name of Frank, and old friends will regret to learn of his death. He was only ill a few days, and the funeral and burial too place in DeWitt.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, December 12, 1934

Oldest Native. - Melvin F. Anderson was born in Randolph County 82 years ago. - He moved to Union City with his parents in 1853. - Passed away Tuesday at his home on North Howard Street.

Melvin F. Anderson, one of Union City's best known and honored citizens passed away Tuesday Dec. 11, 1934 at his home on North Howard street. He had been ailing for the past two years but managed to be about with the aid of a cane until Monday Dec. 3rd. when he took to his bed in what was to prove his last illness. In spite of the best of medical aid and the best of care he grew steadily worse and he closed his eyes in sleep that knows no awakening at half past one o'clock in the morning.

Melvin Francis Anderson was born Dec. 5, 1852 at South Salem, south of Union City and he was one of seven children born to William and Hester Ann (House) Anderson. When only a year old he with his parents moved to Union City and the father who was a fine blacksmith of the old school and he established a shop on North Howard street south of the Backstay-Welt building. He and his family resided in a house which was raised to make room for the south part of the present Backstay-Welt factory.

Here the boy Melvin Anderson grew up and although he attended school when only nine years old he entered his father's blacksmith shop as an apprentice to learn the trade thus beginning a vocation in which he was to have a remarkable career for he was actively employed in the blacksmithing trade for 70 years.

The first part of this period was spent in a blacksmith shop which his father built on Columbia street, across the alley from the I. G. A. Grocery. This was at that time one of the finest brick buildings on Columbia street and probably one of the finest blacksmith shops in our two states. This building still stands and is one of our well-known business rooms.

After that for about 40 years "Mel" Anderson as he was known to his friends conducted his blacksmith shop on Union street at the rear of the Ted Caron garage. He retired from his shop about two years ago, closing a career as a blacksmith which is probably in record not only in Union City and the states of Indiana and Ohio, but probably in the United States. He left a record of which his descendants can be proud for honesty, industry and reliability.

He was married Oct. 17, 1884 in St. Louis, Mo. to Miss Mary Casten, whom he met while on a visit to the home of his uncle in that city. They celebrated their golden wedding Oct. 17, 1934. Two children were born to them who with the wife and mother survive. They are Mrs. Annette Bromagem of Dunkirk, Ind., and Walter L. Anderson of the Backstay-Welt Co., where he has been employed for the past 26 years. Besides the above he is survived by one grandson, Bozarth Bromagem and two brothers, Harry W. Anderson, local manager of the Indiana-Ohio Public Service Co., and Edward Anderson of North Howard street.

Mr. Anderson was never affiliated with any church, yet he lived a thoroughly Christian life. Neither was he a member of any lodge but his life is a good example of the best in fraternalism. He helped in his modest way to build up Union City and lived to see it grow from a village of a few houses to a thriving city. He was of a quiet but friendly disposition and he never spoke ill of any one. He went the even tenor of his way through a long useful and honorable life and he will be long remembered as a good citizen.

The Times joins the friends in extending sympathy to the surviving relatives.

The funeral will take place Thursday Dec. 13 at 2 p. m. from the late home of the departed, 712 North Howard street, conducted by Rev. Chas. McCallister. Burial in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, December 13, 1934

Funeral Rites for Clara Denlinger to be held at church.

Greenville, O. --- Mrs. Albert Deeter, this city, has received word of the death of her sister, Mrs. Clara Denlinger, 58 years old, wife of Harvey Denlinger, a Montgomery county farmer, which occurred at her winter home at Cocoa, Fla., Sunday afternoon.

The body has been returned to the Denlinger home at Stillwater near Dayton and funeral services are to be conducted from the Stillwater church at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon. Burial will be made in the church cemetery.

Mrs. Denlinger, whose maiden name was Clara Aukerman, was born and raised near Palestine, Darke county.

Survivors are her husband, one sister, and six children.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, December 13, 1934

Died. --- Mrs. Jane Coby, widow of the late Peter Coby, at her home, 329 North Columbia street, Wednesday, Dec. 12th, aged 86 years. She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. W. O. Mangas, Mrs. W. A. Brinks, and Mrs. Laura Byron of Hartford City, Ind. Funeral services will be conducted at the Brooks Funeral Home Friday at 2 p. m., Rev. Stultz of Hartford City officiating. Interment in the Lisbon cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, December 17, 1934

Died. --- The funeral of Mrs. Ona Bothast, who passed away at the home of her sister, Mrs. Anderson Davis, in this city Friday, took place at Liberty, Ind. this morning.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, December 18, 1934

Sudden Death. - Willard Ferris of Portland, Ind. dies suddenly. - While on a visit to the H. L. Brunson home in this city.

A sad death took place this morning at the H. L. Brunson residence, 540 W. Chestnut street when Willard (Blonde) Ferris, 34, died from the effects of heart trouble.

He with his wife, came to this city to visit the Brunson family last evening and he was taken suddenly ill with heart trouble and a local physician was called, who lent medical aid and every indication pointed to a recovery, until this morning when he suddenly passed away.

He leaves a wife and two daughters, Erma Louise, 5 years old and Martha Jane, 2 years old besides his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ferris of Portland, Ind., and a brother Norville.

The remains were taken in charge by the Williamson and Son undertaking firm of Portland, Ind. and removed to that city, from where the funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment in the Green Park cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, December 20, 1934

George W. Sell dies.

George W. Sell, 83, a prominent farmer of Jay county, passed away last evening at his home near North Salem, as result of heart trouble.

Geo. Sell always took a keen interest in his community's welfare and leaves a wife and the following children: Mrs. John Bothast, of Muncie, Ind., Howard E. Smith, of Delaware county, Theodore, Mrs. Lewis Kessler, of Welcher, Oregon; Virgil, Mrs. Onie Cline, 23 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. One brother, Wm. K. Sell of North Manchester, Ind., and three sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Simmons of Saratoga, Mrs. Walter Hartley of near Pennville, Ind. and Mrs. Jane Smith.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, December 21, 1934

Called Home. - Mrs. Lavina Fulghum passed away at Winchester this morning. - She was formerly Mrs. Sam Anson, sister of Mrs. P. A. Daily.

The news which reached here this morning of the death of Mrs. Lavina Fulghum at Winchester, caused much sorrow here in Union City, where she resided a greater part of her life.

She had been ill for several weeks and she expired early this morning at her home on East Franklin street. She was a splendid Christian woman and lived a long and useful life.

She was formerly Mrs. Sam Anson and for many years with her daughter, Miss Nina Anson, resided on West Oak street.

On her marriage to Mr. Foghum some years ago she moved to Winchester, but she always kept in close touch with her old town, and many friends here joined by the Times will extend sympathy to the surviving relatives in their sorrow and great loss.

She is survived by the bereaved husband, Mr. Fulghum, and two daughters, Mrs. Mary Anderson, of Richmond, and Miss Nina Anson, at home. One grandson, Richard Anson. Also three sisters, Mrs. P. A. Daily of Union City, Mrs. Retta Vann Dyke, of Muncie, Mrs. Elizabeth Lollar, of Indianapolis. One brother, Joseph Brentner, of Muncie. One son, William, died about three years ago. The body will be removed from the Fraze funeral home in Winchester to the late home of the departed on East Franklin street, and the funeral will take place from the Main Street Christian church Sunday at 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. Lee Jackson. Burial in the Union City cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, December 21, 1934

Ted Harnish - Well-known resident found dead in his bed at Coletown. - He was a visitor in Union City Saturday night and in good spirits.

The news of the death of Joseph D. Harnish and better known to a large circle of friends as Ted, which reached Union City yesterday Thursday afternoon was a shock for he was well-known and had been here mingling with his friends only last Saturday. He was found dead in his bed at his home in Coletown by Roy Young of that village at 11 o'clock in the morning.

The cause of death is reported to have been acute indigestion. Coroner Marker's verdict was in accordance with the above facts.

The body was taken to the Fraze Funeral Home fro preparation for burial.

Joseph D. Harnish was the son of John and Lydia (Armacost) Harnish, and he was born in Darke county at the old family home near the Twin Bridges, Sept. 15, 1883. His father died a number of years ago, and "Ted" and his mother moved to Coletown. The mother passed away a few months ago.

Besides farming, Mr. Harnish followed the trade of painter and he did much of his work in Union City. He was never married. "Ted" was a good fellow, warm hearted, generous and always pleasant and genial, so that he had many friends, which the Times joins in extending sympathy to the surviving relatives. He is survived by the following brothers and sisters: O. M. Harnish, of Shrevesport, La., Bert E. Harnish, Dayton, O., Jess Harnish, Dayton, O., Mrs. Bessie Lane, of the store at Sharpeye, O., and Charles Harnish of Sharpeye.

The funeral will take place Saturday Dec. 22 at 2 p. m. (EST) from the church in Coletown conducted by Rev. Souder. The following will be pallbearers: Dutch Adams, Thomas Lyons, Charles Shewer, Henry Frey, Ray Young and Carmel Ross. Burial will be in the Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, December 24, 1934

Well Known. - Willard Coppess dies at his home east of town this morning. - He was the father of Frank Coppess who was on the school board.

Word has reached here this morning of the death of Willard Coppess which occurred at his home four or five miles east of Union City, near the Wenrick pike early this morning. He had been a semi-invalid the past year a large part of which time he was confined to his home. He was well and favorably known throughout the county and in this city which was one of his regular trading points. He was of a genial friendly disposition and his friends here were always glad to welcome him here when he came to the city.

He was an industrious farmer, well versed in agricultural matters and owned the farm where he lived. He was 74 years of age and a good Christian man being a member of the Christian Church at Teegarden.

He was survived by the second Mrs. Coppess and two sons by his first wife, Harley Coppess, who resided near his father's home and Frank Coppess of Jackson, O. who was formerly a valued member of the school board.

Besides the above he is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Loy Denniston and Mrs. Ida Brandon, of Greenville, also one brother, J. C. W. Coppess, of Greenville, and several grandchildren.

Funeral at 2 o'clock Wednesday at the Teegarden church, Rev. Watson officiating.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home, Ansonia, OH, records state that Willard S. Coppess was born Dec. 26, 1860 in Richland Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of Jacob M. Coppess and Clarissa Plessinger (both also b. in Richland Twp.)]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, December 26, 1934

Two Killed. - In a grade crossing at Richmond, Ind. - Auto struck by interurban at cemetery gate.

Richmond, Ind. --- Two men en route to place flowers on a grave died yesterday as a westbound interurban car struck their automobile at the entrance of the Earlham Cemetery.

John B. Chenoweth, 62, hardware clerk, was killed instantly and William Enslinger, 62, an officer in the local Aerie of Eagles, died a few hours later in a local hospital.

Winfield Urban, 34, son-in-law of Chenoweth, was injured seriously but is expected to recover. The three were planning to visit the grave of Urban's mother.

Frank Miles, motorman of the interurban, said Chenoweth's car and another automobile were traveling parallel in front of the traction car, as they approached the cemetery entrance on the National road west of Richmond. Chenoweth, who was driving, turned directly in front of the interurban, Miles said.

The automobile was dragged 30 feet down the track.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, December 26, 1934

Isaac S. Larkey, 76 years old, dies near Bloomingport.

Lynn, Ind. --- Isaac Samuel Larkey, 76 years old, died at his home near Bloomingport, Monday afternoon.

He is survived by three sons, Robert, James, and John, all at home; five daughters, Mrs. Maggie Rhinehart, Easton, [Eaton?] Ohio; Mrs. Ralph Alfred and Mrs. Esther Rookman, both of Enid, Okla.; Mrs. Nerva Mayabb, Muskogee, Okla., and Viola, at home; and one sister, Mrs. Martha Taylor, Richmond.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Methodist church at Boston with Rev. Elmer Hale of Boston officiating. Burial will be in the Boston cemetery. Friends may call at the home anytime.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, December 28, 1934

Life's Work. - Of Ezra Coddington come to an end suddenly. - Passes away as result of heart trouble at the James Welch farm.

Ezra Coddington, 69 years old, died suddenly at the farm home of James Welch, where he was living, two miles west of this city, shortly after noon Thursday of apoplexy.

Welch and Coddington had been working together during the forenoon and Coddington had apparently not been feeling ill. The two men went to the house at noon to eat and Coddington went into a front room to lie down. Hearing a noise, Welch entered the room to find Coddington had rolled off a couch. A doctor was called but the man died before his arrival.

The deceased was a member of the Poplar Grove Church of the Brethren. He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Frank Monks of Winchester and Mrs. Norman Shockney, Harrisburg, Ill. Services will be conducted at the Fraze Funeral Home, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. J. A. Watson. Interment will be in Conklin Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, December 31, 1934

Zach Woods - Succumbs to the injury received from circular saw. - Seemed to rally Sunday but the end came at 1:45 Monday morning. - He was one of Union City's best Known citizens.

The death of Zach Woods which occurred at forth-five minutes past one o'clock this Monday morning will prove a great shock to Union City for he was one of Union City's best known and highly valued citizens. His death was caused by the accident which befell him on Christmas day in his workshop, located on the State Line, at the rear of his late home, 324 North Union Street and as fully told about in the Times of Wednesday, Dec. 26. It is a reasonable conclusion that he was momentarily overcome by the fumes from the gas engine, which caused him to fall on the rapidly revolving circular saw, which lacerated his left arm and notwithstanding that some young men applied an impromptu tourniquet, the loss of blood and the shock were more than he could overcome.

After the amputation of his arm, he seemed to recover for a few moments and noted that his arm was gone, however, it is not thought that he fully realized the disaster that had befallen him and he never regained consciousness again.

Zacharias Woods was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Washington Woods and he was born July 10, 1860, five miles east of Union City in what at that time was known as the Oren Young settlement. He attended school in that district, and for sixteen years he worked for Oren Young on the farm. Then he took up carpentering which became his life work. He came to Union City as a young man and in 1900 he formed a partnership with Joe Eichelbarger in the carpentering and building industry. This partnership lasted until 1910 when Mr. Woods launched into business for himself as a carpenter and contractor. He soon built up a fine business and many buildings in Union City and large barns throughout the county were built by him, including the buildings on the Koontz block, the Rosenbush building, the Bell Building, the Ohio Side school and many more too numerous to mention.

He was married to Mrs. Rosella Ruff August 25, 1905, the ceremony being performed by Dr. E. E. Ortlip of the Lutheran church in Greenville. Zack Woods, as he was universally called, was a good citizen in all that term implies, and he has meant much to the city of his adoption and which he helped to build up in more ways than one. He was a whole souled fellow who radiated good will toward his fellowmen, and he was never called on in vain when help was needed for a worthy cause. He was always genial and pleasant and was always welcome wherever he appeared.

He was also a Christian gentleman and for years was affiliated with the Lutheran church in which he held the position of trustee, was a member of the church council, and president of the Men's Society of that church.

He will be greatly missed and he will be mourned by many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the sorrowing widow, brother and sisters.

Besides the widow he is survived by one brother, William W. Woods, Elkton, W. Va., and two sisters, Mrs. Angeline Passmore of near Cosmos, O., and Mrs. Mary Ramsey, Dayton. Also eleven nieces and four nephews, including Mrs. Delbert Siever, Waterhouse, Mrs. Fern Kaufman, Dayton, and Mrs. Ollie Lantz, Greenville, O.

[See January 3, 1935 newspaper for account of the funeral service}

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