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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 11, 1934

Answers Call. - Valentine Romeiser, one of Union City's most honored citizens, dies. - He was born in Steinau, Germany eighty-five years ago. - He was a master wagon-maker and with wheel works 30 years.

In the death of Valentine Romeiser Union City loses one of her most honored citizens and the entire community will sincerely mourn his passing. His health first began to fail about a year ago and there was a steady decline owing to his advanced age until about a week ago, when his condition became critical and he passed away Sunday morning at 7 o'clock, rich in years and a life lived to the honor of his country and his family.

Valentine Romeiser was born August 25th, 1848 in Steinau, Kurbessia Province, Germany. At the age of 18 years he chose to leave his native country and to seek his fortune in America. In 1866 he arrived in Cincinnati, Ohio where he remained for a short time and then came to Winchester, Ind. In 1868 he arrived in Union City and has made this city his final home.

Mr. Romeiser lived an active and useful life. He served the community with the fruits of his skill and labor as a master wagon maker who served his apprenticeship in Germany. His honest efforts to build the best he could was attested to by farmers and user of wagons over a wide area in this part of our two states, and some of his work is still in active use.

He was always friendly and cheerful, helpful and had a pleasant smile foe everyone. Of him it could be said that he had no enemies and he never was known to speak ill of anyone.

His loyalty to his church was keen. For 40 years he served as a member of the Lutheran Council or Vestry in every capacity which such service affords. When he first reached Winchester and while he was a resident of that city he walked the distance to Union City each Sunday morning for nearly a year.

He moved from Winchester to Union City in 1871 and he bore an active part in the upbuilding of the city with the early history of which he was well acquainted.

After conducting his own wagon shop he gave that up and accepted a responsible position with the Union City Wheel Works, a place which he held for 30 years. He was well versed in the early history of Union City.

His life was one of service, useful citizenship, devotion to his home, church and the land of his choice. At one time he was a member of the Winchester home militia and served under Captain Brown.

It follows therefore as the day the night that such a man had a host of friends and the Times joins in extending sympathy to the bereaved children and other relatives.

Mr. Romeiser was married to Marie Catherine Schneidermann and after her death he was married in 1882 to Sophia B. Hoelzel, who also precede him to the land beyond.

He is survived by the following children: Charles H. Romeiser, Auburn, Ind.; Clara L. Thokey, Union City; Otto W. Romeiser, Dayton; Freda W. Wildermuth, Earnest G. Romeiser, Union City; Herman M. Romeiser, Dayton; One stepdaughter, Lydie Schultz, Van Dyne, Wis. Also several grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

The funeral announcement will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Times.

Died: Mr. Valentine Romeiser, Sunday, June 10, 1934, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frieda Wildermuth, 703 W. Hickory street; aged 85 years, 9 months, and 15 days. The body will be taken from the Fraze Funeral Home to the Wildermuth residence Monday morning. Funeral services will be held at the Lutheran church Tuesday, June 12, 1934, at 2 p. m., conducted by Rev. H. A. Barth. Interment in City Cemetery.

[An Obituary published June 13th stated that he was born in the village of Steinnan, Kurkessia, Germany, the son of Peter and Katherine Romeiser. Further genealogical information can be found here.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 11, 1934

Died. --- Mrs. Lucy Hunt, mother of J. D. Hunt, passed away yesterday at 1:30. She had been seriously ill for several months and only a few weeks ago lost her husband quite suddenly. She is more that 75 years old, lives in Terre Haute, Ind. and is survived by four sons and one daughter. The funeral is at 2 o'clock tomorrow.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 11, 1934

Collision. - Of two automobiles causes death of Portland woman. - Mrs. Wm. Skinner, 70, killed and others injured.

Portland, Ind. --- Mrs. William Skinner, 70, wife of a monument dealer here, was killed in a head-on automobile crash about 8:30 o'clock last night on state road 26, five miles east of Portland. Her husband [was driving the car.] Ralph Baughman, driver of the machine which struck the Skinner car, and his companions, Clifford and William Thompson, all of Portland, were injured.

The Baughman's car crashed into the Skinner machine when it went out of control after the driver attempted to bring it back on the pavement from the berm. The Skinner car was traveling west. Both cars were badly damaged.

Mrs. Skinner only lived a few minutes after the crash. Her husband sustained cuts on his knee and lip and probable internal injuries. William Thompson, who was the most seriously injured of the occupants in the other car, suffered a bad scalp wound, two cuts in the throat and a slight concussion of the brain. The other two were bruised and cut. The injured were brought to the Jay County Hospital. Clifford Thompson is home on a furlough from his duties in the U. S. navy.

Surviving Mrs. Skinner besides her husband, are one son, Walter, and a daughter, Mrs. Charles Thomas, of Conway, Ark.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 12, 1934

Plane Victim. - Cousin of Mrs. W. B. Knipe of this city in crash Saturday. - Wm. Baxter Bader was a passenger in American Airway plane.

One of the victims in the American Airways airplane crash in the mountains in New York state was a cousin of Mrs. W. Knipe, wife of the office manager of the Public Service Company of Indiana. The cousin referred to was Wm. Baxter Bader, of Buffalo, N. Y., and formerly of Indianapolis. Mr. Bader was one of the four passengers of the unfortunate plane when while it was soaring through a fog and thunderstorm the twin-motored biplane cut a long gash through the tree tops and crashed half-way up the rugged mountain side and all seven of the occupants of the plane were killed as told about by the newspaper and radio.

The news of the awful accident was naturally a great shock to Mr. and Mrs. Knipe who reside on High street and the last time they saw their cousin was when he left Indianapolis for New York.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 14, 1934

Passes Away. - Rufus E. Stewart dies at his farm home. - He had followed farming all his life.

Rufus E. Stewart, prominent farmer of five miles northwest of Union City, passed away Wednesday afternoon at his country home at 1:30 p. m. from a two years illness, but serious five weeks of complications. He was born April 26, 1869 making him 65 years, 1 month and 8 days of age. He was the son of Clark and Sarah Ann (Warren) Stewart and was born in Jackson Township, Randolph County, Ind. He has followed farming his entire life and lived on the farm where he died something like 14 years. In December 1888 he married Minnie Sipe who survives with one son, William R. Stewart of Ft. Recovery, Ohio and one grandson whom he raised, R. D. Stewart of Jackson Township, Randolph County, Ind.

He is also survived by the following brothers and sisters: Nancy, wife of Joseph Hoover, of Greenville, O.; William, John and Herbert, all of Union City R. R.; one sister and two brothers deceased, one brother being the late J. W. Stewart of north of Saratoga.

Funeral services will be held Saturday, June 16th at 2 p. m. at the Lisbon Church in charge of Rev. Edward Justice of Muncie, Ind. Interment in the Lisbon Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 14, 1934

Joseph Baxter.

Lynn, Ind. --- The body of Joseph Baxter, 24 years old, whose death occurred in Little Rock, Ark., arrived in Richmond Wednesday afternoon at 3:10 o'clock. The funeral cortege left Richmond for Winchester where graveside services were held in Fountain Park Cemetery about 3:30 o'clock. Rev. Ira Johnson and Rev. Earl Lantz, officiated.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, June 15, 1934

Long Illness. - Precedes the death of Lafayette Conrad, well known of Darke Co. - Lived nearly all of his life on farm near Elroy, O.

Lafayette Conrad, an old and respected resident of Darke County, and for the past two years a citizen of Union City, O., died this morning after a long illness which began last Christmas. May 56h his condition became alarming, and while everything possible was done for him in the way of medical treatment and the best of care, the had of the Grim Reaper could not be stayed and he passed away this Friday morning at twenty minutes to three o'clock.

Lafayette Conrad was born May t, 1860, and he was therefore 74 years of age at the time of his death. He was born in Hocking County, Ohio, and his parents were David and Lucinda (Richards) Conrad. He came to Elroy, O., when a young lad of about 16 years and worked on a farm.. He was always energetic and thrifty and the time came when he bought a farm and in the course of time paid for it and so became one of the well known land owners of the Elroy community. He attended school in the grades in Hocking County, O., and completed his studies in what was known as the Roe school.

He was married Feb. 26, 1892, to Ella Sullenbarger, and five children were born to this union, the following three of whom are living, Ray B. Conrad, of Claire, Mich.; George D. Conrad, who has been confined in a hospital in Detroit, Mich. for the past two years, and one daughter, Mrs. Rich Johnson, of Geneva, Fla. One son and one daughter, named Pearl, died in infancy.

For the past two years Mr. Conrad has resided at No. 402 East Main St. and during his comparatively short residence here he made many, many friends. He was of a pleasant disposition, honest and upright and a real Christian, being a life-long member of the Church of the Brethren. The friends extend sincere sympathy to the bereaved widow and children, and other relatives. Besides the above he is survived by three brothers, Emmanuel, of near Elroy, O; Jesse, of Main street, and William of Division street. Also one sister, Mrs. Emma Armstrong, of Chestnut street, and six grandchildren. The funeral arrangements will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Times.

Died --- Lafayette Conrad, Friday June 15, 1934; aged 74 years, 1 month and 9 days. The body was taken from the Fraze Funeral Home to the residence 402 E. Main street Friday morning. Funeral services will be held in the local Church of the Brethren Sunday at 2 p. m. C. S. T., conducted by Rev. Abraham Miller and Rev. Ivan L. Erbaugh. Interment will be in the Teegarden Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, June 15, 1934

Laid to Rest. - Funeral services for F. W. Coby held at Grand Rapids, Mich. - He lived the greater part of his life in this community.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. O. Mangas, Mrs. W. A. Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Kester Mrs. Agnes Byrum, Mr. Ralph Mangas of this city and Mrs. Laura Birum of Hartford City have returned from Grand Rapids, Mich. where they attended the funeral of Mr. F. W. Coby.

Mr. Coby, who was the son of Pete Coby, came to Union City, O. many years ago with his parents, first residing on the Ohio side and later moving to the farm north of town known now as the Chas. Simmons farm but owned at that time by Nathan Cadwalader.

Here as a boy he grew up, assisting with the farming and the care of a large dairy which the father operated.

The older residents will no doubt recall the milk wagon Frank drove, dipping the milk from his large milk cans into containers the customers brought to the wagon.

Mr. Coby started his life profession of railroader before 21 years of age. First as call boy, baggage hauler, and from there to be promoted step by step in the work he loved, finally reached the goal he hoped to attain of conductor. His work of late years had taken him to Grand Rapids, Mich., where he and his wife for a number of years had made their home. His run being from Grand Rapids, to Richmond, Ind., on the G. R. and I. road. He was trying faithfully to round out the years of service which would give him a pension to retire with. But suddenly within 2 years of this goal he was stricken with apoplexy and called to the home beyond.

In 1888 he married Della Mae Sutton, daughter of Platt Sutton (deceased) who resided on W. Oak St. Six children were born to them who with their mother are left to mourn the first break in their family circle, namely Russel Coby, Mrs. Hazel McGirk, Mrs. Ethel Martin and Mrs. Helen Horn of Ft. Wayne, Ind.; Mr. Raymond Coby, Mr. Herschel Coby of Grand Rapids, Mich. Mr. Coby also leaves an aged mother now 85 years of age residing at Hartford City, Ind., three sisters, Mrs. Laura Binne of Hartford City, and Mrs. Wm. O. Mangas and Mrs. W. A. Brooks of this city.

The funeral was held Monday June 11, at Grand Rapids, Mich. Rev. Janet of St. Paul's Methodist Church and Chaplin Thorn of the G. R. and I. Veterans conducting the same.

In the going out of Mr. Coby a life of 67 busy useful years for his family and friends will be missed, in the home, and among the many friends he has made all along the way.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, June 18, 1934

Died. --- Amanda L. Siegler, wife of George Siegler, Saturday, June 16, 1934 at the residence in Ridgeville, Ind.; aged 77 years, 11 months and 11 days. Funeral services will be held at the Ridgeville Evangelical Church Monday at 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. Young. Interment in Ridgeville cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 19, 1934

Called Home. - Daisy Devor passes away at her home near North Salem. - Had lived all her life in Jackson, Indiana township.

The angel of death summoned Daisey Devor Monday afternoon at the home of her sister, Mrs. James McFadden, one mile south of North Salem, as the result of heart trouble.

The deceased was born in Jackson township, Randolph county, August 20, 1872, the daughter of Benjamin and Lenia (Pratt) Devor, being at the time of her death, 61 years, 9 months and 28 days of age. She was born and lived all her life on the farm on which she died.

Surviving are the mother, who is seriously ill at the McFadden home; two sisters, Mrs. William Clough, of Union City and Mrs. James McFadden, at whose home she died; one brother Frank Devor of Greenville, Ohio; one niece, Mable Fuller, of Greenville, Ohio, and one nephew, Ben Clough, of near Union City. The father died in 1905.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 19, 1934

Died. --- Vesta Ann Beitel, wife of Oliver C. Beitel, Monday, June 18, 1934 at the residence 640 W. Pearl street; aged 39 years. Graveside services will be held at Gas City, Ind. Wednesday afternoon followed by interment.

[She left one son and one daughter.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 19, 1934

Funeral. - For the Spartanburg auto victim took place this afternoon. - Murland Campbell who was also injured will recover.

Winchester, Ind. --- Funeral services for Oscar R. Campbell, 23, who was fatally injured Sunday afternoon at the cross streets in Spartanburg when the car in which he was riding smashed into a tree in avoiding another car, will be held at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon at the Jericho Church in charge of the Rev. Le Jackson, pastor of the Main Street Church of Christ in Winchester. Burial will be in Jericho Cemetery. Murland Campbell, who was also in the car and received serious injuries about the chest, is confined to the Randolph County Hospital. He was somewhat improved today but the result of the X-ray pictures taken have not been revealed. Norval Campbell and Miss Dendena Bales, also in the car at the time of the crash, received only minor cuts and bruises. The body of Oscar Campbell was taken from the Clark-Maynard-Potter funeral home Monday afternoon to the home of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Campbell, one mile south of Bartonia. Survivors besides the parents are three brothers, Murland, Norval and Thur, and a sister, Lucrecia.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, June 21, 1934

Child Killed. - Phyllis Ann Mayne darted in front of Paul Stocksdale's car. - Stocksdale was formerly employed in A. and P. store here.

The following sad story come from Newcastle, Ind. where the accident happened late yesterday afternoon.

Phyllis Ann Mayne, two and a half-year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Mayne of 2703 East Broad street, was fatally injured last evening when she was struck by an automobile driven by Paul Stocksdale, 25, of 1561 Broad street.

The child died at the Henry County hospital this morning at about 10:30 o'clock as a result of a fractured skull. Her right leg and right arm were fractured and she was lacerated about the head and face.

The accident occurred around 5 o'clock last evening on East Broad street near the home of the parents. According to the version told police, the tot started to cross the street and the driver of the car slowed down his car to permit her to do this safely. But the child suddenly turned and darted in front of the car and was knocked to the pavement.

Coroner Elmer Bentley was beginning an investigation into the accident this afternoon expecting to take deposition from several witnesses including the driver of the car and his companion, whose name was not learned.

The body of the child was removed to the V. T. Favis Funeral home and arrangements had not been completed for the rites this afternoon.

Charles Stocksdale was formerly employed in the A. and P. store here where his brother, Larkin is now a clerk. Their mother died quite recently and Charles' many friends here sympathize with him in his hard luck.

It is said the little girl had thrown a twig into the road and had started out after it when the accident occurred.

[Stocksdale was exonerated of all blame in the accident by the Coroner's investigation.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, June 26, 1934

Death Calls. - A. Harvey Edington crosses the great divide Monday night. - Passed through long period of illness though death came suddenly. - Connected with Panhandle Railroad for more than thirty years.

A. H. Edington, better known to his friends at "Harve" Edington, passed away last night at his home 826 West Hickory street after a long illness though his death came suddenly, as the result of a heart attack. Some nine years ago he underwent an operation at Mayo Brothers for the removal of a goiter and he never fully recovered from this ordeal. Two years ago he had his first heart attack, and February 6th of this year he was forced to take to his bed again and he was more or less ill from that time until the end came last night, though he was out driving no later than Sunday.

About 6:30 p. m. Monday he walked into the kitchen where his daughter, Mrs. Ralph Mangas was employed when he suddenly staggered and fell to the floor. Ralph heard the impact of his body as it struck the carpet and he came in. The two helped him to a chair and a little later with the assistance of John Dillon they carried the stricken man to his bed while the doctor was called. He never recovered and he crossed the Great Divide at 20 minutes past 10 o'clock Monday June 25, 1934.

Arthur Harvey Edington was born May 8, 1870 near Decatur, Ind. and his parents were James and Sarah (Lichtenwalter) Edington. He attended the schools of his district and when still quite a young man he learned telegraphy and later worked for several railroads as operator. He finally secured a good position with the Pennsylvania Lines Railroad and was connected with this company for over 30 years.

He was married June 28, 1891 to Miss Elida Sawyer at the home of the bride's parents in Bluffton, Ind. To this union three children were born, Mrs. June Brooks, of Bluffton, Ind.. Mrs. Mary Mangas, of this city. One son, Arthur Daniel died at the age of two years.

The wife and mother preceded her husband to the Land Beyond six years ago.

Besides the above Mr. Edington is survived by one grandson, Bobby Mangas and two brothers, Frank Edington, of Sturgis, Mich., and Clark Edington, of Columbia City, Ind. One sister and four brothers have gone before.

The family moved to Union City from Ridgeville in August 1918. They had moved to Ridgeville from Logansport where they resided for several years.

Harvey Edington was a fine style of American manhood and lived a useful upright life. It was always a pleasure to meet him for he generally had a genial smile to greet you with and when he spoke he generally had something worthwhile to say.

He took a great interest in his railroad company and in the city of his adoption and was always ready to do more than his share of any good work underway. He was a good Christian and a member of the Methodist church.

He was also a valued member of the Masonic Lodge. Naturally then he made and retained many friends whom the Times joins in expressing sincere sympathy to the relatives in their great sorrow and irreparable loss.

The funeral will take place Thursday at 10 a. m. from the home on Hickory street, conducted by Rev. True S. Haddock of Alexandria, Ind. The burial will take place in Fairview cemetery, Bluffton, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, June 27, 1934

Obituary. --- Mrs. Mary E. Buffington, wife of John E. Buffington was found dead in her bed at her home near Union Bridge Wednesday morning by a member of the family. Dr. T. H. Legg, of Union Bridge, who was summoned, said death had been due to natural causes and had occurred several hours previous. She appeared to have been in her usual state of health Tuesday. She was aged 66 years, 5 months and 27 days. She was the daughter of the late John W. and Martha Boone of Frederick county and leaves her husband and the following children: Raymond, Ira and John A. Buffington, Union Bridge; Emory R. Buffington, Wakefield; Mrs. Martha Decker, Baltimore, and Mrs. Mary Wachter, Union Bridge. She is also survived by a number of grandchildren and by two brothers: William Boone, Union City, Ind. and Arthur C. Boone, Finksburg.

The funeral took place from her late residence last Friday at 2 p. m. with all services at the home and interment in Mountain View Cemetery, Union Bridge. Mrs. Buffington was held in the highest esteem in the community. Plymouth Lodge, A. F. and M., furnished the pall bearers.

[This was a Maryland funeral and all towns mentioned, other than Union City, are located in Maryland.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 2, 1934

Isaac Warren. - Succumbs after a six weeks illness at his home on Union Street. - He was one of Randolph county's best known farmers.

Isaac Warren, one of the best known retired farmers in Randolph county was called by death Sunday afternoon. He became ill six weeks ago, and though everything possible was done for him in the way of medical attendance and the best of care he grew gradually worse and Sunday he suffered a heart attack from which he never rallied and the spirit took its flight at 30 minutes after three o'clock Sunday, July 1, 1934.

Isaac Wesley Warren was born Feb. 22, 1859, and he was therefore 75 years of age at the time of his death. He was born on the old Warren homestead near the center of Jackson, Ind.. township. His parents were Delphin and Nancy (Taylor) Warren. He received his education in his district school.

In the month of March 1910 he was married to Narcissus Snell, who has preceded him to the better land. One son was born to this union, Robert Jonathan Warren, who with his wife, resides on a farm north of Union City.

Isaac Warren grew up on the ancestral home place and when he grew to mans' estate he took up farming on his own account. He was considered one of the best posted men in agricultural affairs in the county and so that he enjoyed a large measure of success goes without saying.

He moved to Union City from the farm 19 years ago and since that time he has been a respected citizen of Union City. He was a man who had a very friendly nature and he liked good company.

A wonderful companionship developed between him and his only child his son Robert, whose mother passed away when Robert was a very small child. The two lived together and wrought together and each filled the other's life. Isaac Warren was of sterling honesty and his given word was as good as his written bond. Many friends will mourn his death and he will be missed from the community.

The Times joins the friends in extending sympathy to the sorrowing son and his young wife in their great loss.

Besides the above he is survived by two sisters, Mary E. Castle, of north of Saratoga and Nancy Lovina Cromer, of Catawba, O.

The funeral announcements will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Times.

Died. --- Isaac Wesley Warren, at the residence 415 N. Union Street, Sunday July 1, aged 75 years. The body will be returned to the residence from the Brooks funeral home Monday evening. Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday July 3rd at 2 p. m. at the Lisbon church, Rev. Earl Lantz officiating. Interment in Lisbon cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 2, 1934

Lineman killed near Maxville

Winchester, Ind. --- Merrill Fraze, 31, a lineman for the electric light company, here, was killed while working on the Winchester lines near Maxville about noon today. He lost his balance when his spurs slipped and in falling his head grazed against a 6900 volt wire. The body was brought to the Fraze funeral home and will be taken to his home on East Washington street Monday. The survivors are the widow, father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Milo Fraze, one sister, Mrs. Elmer Ratchford, and four brothers, Vere, Glen and Ray Fraze and Ernie Nickey.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 2, 1934

Passes away. - O. Leroy Morrow dies at his home near Portland, Indiana. - Was the brother of O. L. Morrow of this city.

Portland, Ind. --- O. LeRoy Morrow, 61, former Jay County treasurer, died Saturday at the home, two miles south of Portland, from heart disease. He is survived by the widow, one son, Thurlow Morrow, of Richmond, one sister, Mrs. L. E. Broyles, of Seymour, and three brothers, Orville, of Fortville, Othel, of Careywood, and Ort L. Morrow, of Union City. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon at the home, the Rev. E. J. Wickersham officiating. Burial will be in the Odd Fellow Cemetery at Pennsville.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 3, 1934

Died. --- The funeral services for Rent Gard, 74, who died suddenly as a result of an attack of indigestion at his home on Central Ave., Sunday morning, took place at the home of the deceased this afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment took place in the Teegarden cemetery.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home, Ansonia, Ohio records state that Lurentes Gard was born Dec. 23, 1859 in Ohio, the son of Riley Gard and Helen Dowler, both also born in Ohio. He was a widower and his wife, Carrie V. Gard, died Dec. 22, 1922. She is also mentioned in these records and is buried at the Teegarden cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, July 5, 1934

Called Home. - Miss. Mary Schronz succumbs after month of illness. - She was born in New York City 80 years ago.

Miss Mary A. Schronz, one of the most beloved women in Union City passed to her reward on the morning of the Fourth of July after an illness of several months. The first symptoms of her illness came on her in February of this year. In spite of everything that could be done for her which included the best of care and medical attention she grew gradually worse. During the past month she grew daily worse and Sunday, July 1st her condition became critical and on Wednesday July 4th at 20 minutes past 10 o'clock the spirit of this noble woman winged its way to her home of eternal rest.

Mary Anna Schronz, was born in New York City February 16, 1854 and she was therefore a few months past 80 years of age at her death.

She was the daughter of Joseph and Thresa Schronz with whom she came to Union City in 1858 and she was therefore among the first arrivals in Union City. Her mother and father died many years ago.

Miss Schronz attended St. Mary's school and at the age of 16 she took on the art of dressmaking and she became one of the leading dressmakers in this section of the states of Indiana and Ohio, a position which she held for over 60 years.

She was a woman of beautiful character and goodness of heart. She was a real Christian and a life-long member of the Catholic Church. She was also a valued member and during her years of health a very active member of the Rosary Society. To many she was known as an angel of mercy - how many will never be known for she loved to do her many deeds of kindness, quietly and unostentatiously and so only those who were the beneficiaries of her generosity knew of it.

She was also a woman of pleasing personality and the smile with which she met everyone will live long in memory. And so her friends were legion. She will be sincerely mourned and long remembered by the hosts that were proud to call her friend and the Times joins these friends in extending sympathy to the brother, Edward O. Schronz and wife who are the only surviving relatives.

The remains will be brought to the home on North Howard street from the Fraze funeral home Thursday afternoon where friends can view the remains.

The Funeral will take place Saturday July 7th from St. Mary's Catholic Church at 9 a. m. conducted by Rev. Father Shea. Burial in the Catholic Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, July 5, 1934

Child Killed. - John R. Lennon instantly killed near Noblesville, Indiana. - Was walking along the highway when struck by automobile.

Word came to this city of the tragic death of John Robert Lennon, 7, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Lennon near their home at Noblesville, Ind. He was walking along the highway when struck by an automobile driven by Joseph V. Gaebler of Rockville, Ind. Gaebler was arrested on a charge of manslaughter, and is being held at Noblesville, Ind. Miss Lena Albright of Crawfordsville, Ind., and "Sandy" Detro of New Castle, Ind., who were riding in the Gaebler car at the time of the accident are being held as material witnesses.

He was the son of the former Miss Frances Ennis of this city, and a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Ennis of Anderson, Ind. Thus morning Messes Anna and Chrissie Ennis, Mrs. Warren Montano and Mrs. George Eisenman went to Noblesville, Ind. to attend the funeral.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 6, 1934

Parachute victim's body to be returned to Winchester today.

Winchester, Ind. --- Representatives of a local funeral firm left here today for Streator, Ill., to return the body of Pat Blansett, local parachute jumper, who fell to his death there while attempting to make a triple parachute leap as part of a Fourth of July celebration.

The funeral directors are expected to return here about noon when funeral arrangements will probably be announced. In all of Blansett's local jumps he had requested a local mortician to be present with an ambulance and the requests had been complied with. However, in spite of many rough landings, the parachute jumper had never been more than badly shaken up.

The victim was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Maldo Blansett, living four miles south of Winchester. His wife was with him at the time of the accident in Streator. She is the daughter of Roll Catron of Winchester.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 9, 1934

Passes Away. - Mrs. James Short dies at her home Saturday morning. - Had lived all her life in this city and a true Christian woman.

In the death of Mrs. Alice Short, 71, at her home Saturday morning at her home, 619 East North street, Saturday morning, Union City loses one of its most highly respected and beloved Christian women. She had been ill for over a year and gradually grew worse last week.

She was the daughter of Jacob and Phoebe (Cherry) Atkinson and was born in Jay county, March 3, 1863. She was united in marriage to James Short, June 27, 1887 who has preceded her in death several years. To this union were born two children, Mrs. Anna May Burke, of this city, and Mrs. May Ellen Dawson of Montgomery, West Virginia., and two grandchildren, James L. Burke and Mary Alice Burke of this city, and two brothers, Jackson Atkinson of Columbus, Ohio, and Jacob Atkinson of Portland, Ind., survive her.

The funeral announcement will be found elsewhere.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 9, 1934

Born Here. - Mrs. Earl Julian passes on at her home in Dayton. - She had been ill for several months and died Sunday at 7 p. m.

The sad news reached here last night of the death of Mrs. Earl Julian who passed away at her home in Dayton, Sunday July 8, 1934, after an illness of several months, becoming ill last March.

Mrs. Julian was born in Union City Sept. 25, 1882, and she was the daughter of John and Margaret (Masson) Smith and her maiden name was Nellie Smith. She spent her girlhood in Union City and was a graduate of our schools. She was married to Earl Julian and three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Julian and they with the father survive her. They are: Margaret Julian, Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Dorothy Crum and Helen Julian of Dayton.

She is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Frances Ford and Mrs. Margaret Hillis, of Greenville, Mrs. Edward Fowler and Mrs. Ben Davis, Union City, Mrs. Harry Smith, Hagerstown, Ind., James Smith, Indianapolis, and John Smith of Burlington, Mass. There are also two grandchildren.

She with her family moved from Union City to Piqua, O. and after a few years in that city they moved to Dayton which has been her home for many years.

She will be remembered here as a woman of lovely character and during her bonny girlhood in Union City she was known and loved by a large circle of friends whom the Times joins in extending sympathy to the surviving relatives.

The remains were brought to the Fraze Funeral home and were removed to the home of her sister, Mrs. Edward Fowler on South State Line road, from whose residence the funeral will take place Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment in the Lisbon Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 9, 1934

Called Home. - Mrs. J. W. Broderick passes away at her home on Pearl Street. - She was a leading member of Women's Relief Corp.

In the death of Mrs. J. W. Broderick Union City loses one of the most prominent and most beloved women. She had been a semi-invalid for the past 12 years and the last three years she spent her waking hours in a wheeled chair and during all of this time she was tenderly and efficiently cared for by Miss Opal Hartman, the well-known trained nurse. In March of 1931 she had a severe hemorrhage which was the beginning of her last illness. She was confined to her room and had since the first of the present year. Last week her son, Dr. Frank Broderick and wife were notified and they arrived Thursday making the 352 mile drive from Sterling Ill. in seven and one-half hours to reach the mother's bedside while she was still alive.

The patient grew rapidly worse and her spirit passed peacefully to the land of eternal life and happiness, there to rejoin the beloved husband who had preceded her March 5, 1918.

Mrs. James Wilson Broderick was born March 7, 1848, and she was therefore 86 years of age at the time of her death. She was born in New Madison, O., where her girlhood was spent and where she attended the little district school.

Her parents were William and Elizabeth (Pitman) Biddle who came to Darke County when it was still a wilderness and they were among the grand old pioneers that built up the country.

The then Miss Elizabeth Biddle was married Sept. 28, 1869 to James Wilson Broderick at that time a young bookkeeper in New Madison. Later he answered Abraham Lincoln's first call for volunteers and after serving three months joined for the war. He was a member of Co. C., 22nd. Indiana Cavalry and served three years and three months, when he was mustered out an invalid.

They had three children: Willie Weldon, who died in infancy, another boy who died at birth and Dr. Frank Brodrick, the well-known physician who with Mrs. Frank Broderick survive the departed.

Mrs. J. W. Broderick, with her family, moved from New Madison to Arcanum in 1884, and here she lived for about six years. She also lived in New Castle, and Lafayette, and in 1899 she with her husband and son, moved to Union City. They bought the little cottage, 535 West Pearl street, and here they resided the rest of their lives.

Mother Broderick was a devout member of the Methodist church and a faithful Christian in all that that word implies. She attended services even when she had to be taken to the church in her wheeled chair.

She was one of the most prominent member of the W. R. C. in the state.

She was president of the W. R. C. in New Castle and Lafayette, and in Union City. She also held several important state offices.

She was a fine mother and noble wife, and her life was devoted to her husband and son.

She was a woman of splendid character and she was always friendly and helpful. She will be long remembered and sincerely mourned by the host of friends as well as the entire community in which she spent more than a third of her long and useful life.

She was the last surviving member of a family of sixteen children, her parents each being twice married. Miss Rebecca Biddle, a sister, having passed away in 1930.

The funeral announcements will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Times.

Died --- Mrs. Cecilia Broderick, Sunday July 8, 1934 at the residence 537 W. Pearl street, aged 86 years. The body was removed to the Fraze Funeral Home where friends may call. Funeral services will be held at the Funeral Home Tuesday at 1:30 p. m. conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier. Interment at New Madison, Ohio.

[Broderick or Brodrick? The Dr. son went by Brodrick.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 10, 1934

Farmer. - Living near Portland, Ind. is killed by automobile. - James Bissel, struck by an auto near College Corner.

Portland, Ind. --- James Bisel, 80, a farmer residing three miles south of here, was killed last night while walking home on U. S. Road 27, when struck by the automobile driven by Lewis Turckes, who resides west of Portland.

Mr. Bisel had attended religious services that are being conducted in a tent here. The accident occurred at College Corner, half a mile south of the city, when Turckes, who was northbound, said he was blinded by the lights of an approaching automobile and did not see the aged man, who was walking against traffic on the east side of the road.

Mr. Bisel suffered a broken neck and both his legs and his right arm were broken. He is survived by one son, Thad, of Bluff Point, the trustee of Pike Township, one daughter, Mrs. Nellie Thomas of Portland; one brother, John, south of Portland, and two half-brothers, Ben Bisel of Albany, and William Bisel of Green Township.

His body was brought to Portland and will be removed to the home of his son this afternoon. Funeral services will be conducted at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at Bluff Point Church, and burial will be made in Bluff Point Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 16, 1934

James Cramer. - Well known Darke County farmer dies at home north of Versailles. - He was the father of Miss Alpha Cramer, East Side primary teacher.

James Cramer, aged 80 years, died early Saturday morning at his home two miles north of Versailles, O., after an illness of eight years from a complication of diseases. He was a well known Darke County farmer. He is survived by nine children, one of whom is Miss Alpha Cramer, teacher of the first grade in the East Side school.

Funeral services were held at the home Monday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, eastern standard time. A floral tribute was sent in the name of the East Side school, and several teachers attended the funeral service.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 16, 1934

Miss Nell Kerrigan dies.

Miss Nell L. Kerrigan, 84, bookkeeper in Indianapolis for many years, died at her home here Friday evening after several months of ill health. She was a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church. She is survived by three sisters and two brothers. Funeral services will be held in St. Mary's Catholic Church at 9 o'clock Monday morning, the Rev. Father M. F. Shea, officiating. Interment in St. Mary's Cemetery.

[From article on Tuesday - Miss Kerrigan is survived by the following sisters and brothers: Mrs. P. C. Howard, of St. Mary's, O.; Anna and Katharine Kerrigan, of Union City, and William Kerrigan, of Logansport, Ind.

The following account appeared in the Logansport Press: "Miss Nell Kerrigan, sister of W. H. Kerrigan, editor and manager of The Logansport Press, died suddenly yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the family home at Union City, Ind.

Miss Kerrigan had spent considerable time in Logansport, the guest of her brother, and Mrs. Kerrigan. A year ago she underwent an operation at the St. Vincent hospital at Indianapolis and never fully recovered her health.

For years she was employed by a number of Indianapolis firms as an accountant, and was known as one of the best authorities of that city on the income tax law.

Mr. Kerrigan will be unable to attend the funeral because of injuries suffered a week ago in an automobile accident."]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 17, 1934

Neck Broken. - James W. Brown meets death in an auto accident. - Was well known in this community and lived at Harrisville, Ind.

James W. Brown, promising young member of the pitching staff of the St. Paul American Association team and a former resident of Harrisville, died Monday from injuries he received in St. Paul when he lost control of the car he was driving on the slippery surface of a hill roadway. Brown, half-brother of Clarence M. Brown, Richmond attorney, would have been 24 years old Tuesday.

The young athlete was enroute to a hospital to see his wife and baby, born July 10, when the accident occurred.

The car turned over three times and his neck was broken.

He was the son of Rev. Brown and pitched ball for the Harrisville team and was well known in Union City.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 17, 1934

Sad Death. - John H. Koester, retired banker is dead at his home in Greenville, O. - Funeral services for former Greenville clothier, bank head tomorrow.

Greenville, O. --- John Henry Koester, 95, years old, a former Greenville clothier and retired bank executive, died at his home, 300 East Third street, at 11 o'clock Sunday night, following a short illness.

Mr. Koester, one of Greenville's oldest residents, had been identified with general business and banking interests here for the last 65 years. He retired from the clothing business in 1905, but up until five years ago still served as president of the old Greenville National bank. He acted in the later capacity for 30 years.

During his active career he was prominent in civic affairs and was an attendant of St. Mary's Catholic Church.

A native of Oldenburg, Germany, he came to this country when a young man. In 1868 he married Mary Elizabeth Kuntz and to their union was born nine children.

His wife and seven children preceded him in death, leaving two daughters, Bertha and Edith Koester, both at home as the only immediate survivors.

Funeral services will be conducted from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning. Rev. Father John A. Gnau will solemnize requiem high mass. Burial will be made in Calvary cemetery at Dayton.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, July 18, 1934

Called Home. - William Hoke passes away at his home in Redkey, Indiana. - Formerly lived in Union City where he spent his boyhood days.

Word has come to our city of the death of William (Seth) Hoke at his home in Redkey, Ind. yesterday afternoon after an illness of about a month.

He was the son of Seth and Elizabeth Hoke, deceased and was born in this city August 20, 1863, where he spent his boyhood days and attended the Union City schools and later moved to Redkey, Ind. where he indulged in the jewelry business.

Surviving are the widow, Eliza, three sons, Lonnie and Bert Hoke, of Muncie, and Clyde Hoke of Winchester; one step-son, Luther Chapman, of Ft. Wayne; one sister, Mrs. Emma Clear, of this City and four grandchildren. Two sisters and five brothers are deceased.

Funeral services will be conducted at the residence at Redkey, Ind. Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Interment in the Lisbon cemetery north of this city.

His father, Seth Hoke, was a master jeweler and he conducted a business 45 years ago in the old frame building which stood at the corner of Oak and Columbia streets, now occupied by the Sebode building.

Seth Junior, as a young man, developed into a great baseball pitcher in the days when a curve ball was still comparatively new. He played with the old star team composed of "Ev" Jackson, Mort and Web. Lambert, Jim Wallace, George and Charles Patchell, Will Yergin and others - a bunch players that was seldom defeated and which played the last game on the diamond in fields west off North Walnut street and bounded on the north by Division street.

The body was returned from the Fraze funeral home to the Hoke home in Redkey at ten o'clock this morning.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, July 18, 1934

Calvin McNees dead.

Winchester, Ind. --- Calvin McNees, 81, died at his home near Winchester early this morning. The body was taken to the Fraze funeral home for burial preparation and was returned to his home this afternoon. Funeral services will be conducted from the Maxville Church at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon in charge of the Rev. George Vanderburg, assisted by the Rev. Lee Jackson. The survivors are two daughters, Mrs. Jesse Driver and Mrs. Golde Hunt, both of Farmland; two sons, John McNees, of Farmland, and Herman McNees, of Winchester; one sister, Mrs. Sabina Ross, of Muncie and two brothers, H. E. McNees and Jesse McNees, both of Winchester.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 20, 1934

Woman - Dies of gangrene from a foot infection. - Moved from Union City to Hillgrove, O. - Burial Saturday.

Mrs. Eldora Custis, 66 years old, a Hillgrove resident, died at 12:30 p. m. Thursday at the Greenville hospital from a gangrene infection which developed from a minor foot injury. It is claimed that she had been ill for the past eight weeks.

Her husband, Frank Custis, is a retired Dayton grocer. The couple moved to Hillgrove three years ago from Union City where they operated the Orchard Inn.

Besides the husband, immediate survivors include an adopted daughter, Mrs. Hershel Young, Greenville; one sister, Mrs. David Turner, Marie Stein, Ohio, and two brothers, Garfield Townsley, Springfield and Hershel Townsley, Toledo.

Funeral services will be conducted from the C. J. Miller funeral home, 238 East Fourth street, Greenville at 10 a. m. Saturday. Burial will be made at Union City.

[Miller Funeral Home Records, Greenville, O. states that she was born July 21, 1861 in Clinton Co., OH, the daughter of Joseph Townsend and Sarah E. Davis, both also born in Clinton Co.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, July 20, 1934

Passed On. - Miss Mabel Smith receives sad message of her stepmother's death. - Miss Smith and James Onkst will attend the funeral Saturday.

Miss Mabel Smith of the Beauty and Barber shop has received the sad news of the death of her stepmother, Mrs. Blanche Smith who passed away at her home in Lafayette, Ind. at 7:30 p. m. Wednesday after several months of illness. Miss Mabel Smith with James Onkst will leave Saturday to drive to Lafayette and attend the funeral which will take place Sunday at 2 p. m. from the M. E. Church at Linden, Ind. Burial in the Linden cemetery. Mrs. Smith who was the chief cook in the Harry Hall Boys dormitory, was 40 years of age and one of the City's most honored and respected women. Miss Mabel Smith is the only remaining survivor of the immediate family and there are also several sisters.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 23, 1934

Died. --- Aaron Waldo Vail, at the residence near Weimer's Mill on the Wildcat road, Sunday July 22, aged 45 years. The body will be returned to the residence from the Brooks Funeral home Monday afternoon. Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday at 2 p. m. (E.S.T.) at the Miller Church, 1 1/2 miles north of Palestine, Rev. Arthur King officiating. Interment in Miller Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 23, 1934

Adam Kabel

Winchester, Ind. --- Funeral services for Adam Kabel were held at 2 p. m. Friday at the Buena Vista Church, Rev. Lee Jackson officiating. Burial will be in the adjoining cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 24, 1934

Death - Was caused by the intense heat Sunday. - George Holzapsel dies at his home in Greenville, Ohio.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Heat claimed the first victim of the season here today when George Holzapsel, 39, died at his residence, 608 Wayne avenue. Mr. Holzapsel was stricken with a heart attack shortly after he returned from a motor trip Sunday brought on by the intense heat.

The deceased was employed as a salesman by the Sanco Products company, of which his father, Louis Holzapsel, Sr. is president.

Mr. Holzapsel was active in civic affairs here.

Surviving him are his widow, Ruby, two sons, Donald and Darwin; one daughter, Jean; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Holzapsel, Sr.; one sister, Mrs. Pauline Lamens, and four brothers, Walter, Fred, Herbert and Louis, Jr.

Funeral arrangements have not as yet been completed.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, July 24, 1934

Died. --- Mrs. Fred Lang, 57, passed away at Dayton, O. Friday as the result of an appendicitis illness. Last evening Lawrence Lyons and wife and James Lyons and wife and Mrs. John Dillon went to Dayton, O., to her late home and returned. This morning Thos. Lyons and Mrs. Elizabeth Russ and Mrs. Thos. Welch went to Dayton, O., to attend the funeral. Interment took place at Dayton, O.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, July 25, 1934

Long Illness. - Precedes the death of a prominent farmer near Twin Bridges. - Death claims Alonzo Wagner who passed away this morning.

Alonzo H. Wagner, a prominent farmer who lived nearly all of his life near the Twin Bridges, passed away this morning at 6:30 o'clock after an illness covering a period of five years during most of which time he was confined to his home on the road east of the Country Club.

Alonzo Wagner was born Feb. 2, 1861 near Bakers Store, Darke County, Ohio, and his parents were Daniel J. and Catharine (Baker) Wagner. He attended the McClure school and Feb. 25, 1886 he was married to Cora Zumbrum who with the following four sons survive: Earl, Guy, Roy and Alva Wagner, all residing in the Twin Bridge locality. There are also nine grandchildren and the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Jacob Noffsinger, and Mrs. Ira Blocker, near Greenville, O., Wm. V. Wagner and Mrs. Hugh Blocker, near Union City, Ira V. Wagner, near Greenville, Mrs. Eli Stocksdale, of near Union City. Two sisters and one brother have preceded the brother.

Mr. Wagner was a fine Christian gentleman and a life-long member of the Church of the Brethren. He was honest and upright and he helped to build up the community in which he lived. He will be missed by many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved family.

The body was brought to the Brooks funeral home to be prepared for burial and the funeral announcements will be made later.

{Funeral services were held on Friday at 10 o'clock (EST) at Poplar Grove Church, Rev. David Lollinger, officiating. Interment in Greenville cemetery. The family requested no flowers sent.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, July 26, 1934

Heat Victim. - Eli Scholl is stricken and dies in a few hours. - The end came this morning at half past seven o'clock. - He was one of the most prominent farmers in our two counties.

The news of the death of Eli M. Scholl his morning came as a decided shock to our community for he was one of the best known and most prominent residents of Randolph and Darke counties. He was apparently as well as ever up to within a few hours before his death. He talked with the reporter of this paper last Saturday morning while he was getting a haircut and a shave at the Romney LaFevre barber shop and those who were in the shop at the time are now wondering if he had a premonition of his end when he said speaking to the reporter, "Well a man has about so long to live and when he gets along in life he's liable to go at any time."

During the morning he did some work and he sat down to noon dinner yesterday Wednesday, but did not eat with his usual heartiness. In fact, he did not complete the meal but got up from the table and said he thought he would go to bed. At 2 o'clock his condition became alarming and a physician was called.

He seemed to rally a little about 4 p. m. but soon grew rapidly worse again and his spirit passed quietly and peacefully to the land of his father's at half-past seven o'clock this morning.

There is no doubt but what his death was directly due to the present intense heat wave.

Eli Scholl was the son of Jacob and Phoebe (Fountz) Scholl and he was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, Jan. 1, 1860. He moved to Greenville with his parents when quite a young man and a little later or about 60 years ago they moved to the Bennett school locality northeast of this city and Eli attended the Bennett school.

He was married Jan. 15, 1881 to Miss Susanna Hart who with two sons, George Scholl, of North Salem and William Scholl, of the old home farm, survive.

Mr. and Mrs. Eli Scholl moved from the home place to the home near the Dunkard church, North State Line about 25 years ago and Eli lived there up to the time of his death.

Eli Scholl was a Christian gentleman in all that that term stands for and he was a life long member of the Church of the Brethren in which he held the important place of deacon and director.

He was also intensely interested in all civic affairs and in 1900 was elected as trustee of Jackson Twp., Ohio, a position which he held with great credit to himself and the schools. He always stood for the best in citizenship and he was a leader in any movement for the betterment of the home community and township, and county.

He was a man of fine character and a genial friendly disposition so that his friends were legion and he was always welcome in any company he cared to join. He was honest "personified" and he held a place which it will be hard to fill since he is gone, and he will be greatly missed and long remembered by the many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the sorrowing widow, sons, grandchildren and other relatives.

Besides the above he is survived by eight grandchildren and ten great grandchildren.

He was the last surviving member of a family of three brothers and five sisters.

The funeral will take place Sunday at 3 p. m. from the Church of the Brethren conducted by Rev. Ivan Erbaugh. Burial in the Dunkard Cemetery.

[Brethren Cemetery north of Union City.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, July 30, 1934

Driver Killed. - When his car hits the wall at Funk's Lake speedway. - Small crowd witness races Sunday.

Winchester, Indiana - Charles H. Haskell, 26, of Lincoln, Neb., was killed instantly about 9:30 o'clock Sunday morning when his racing auto struck a concrete retaining wall and hurtled over the south turn at Funk's Lake half-mile dirt speedway near here.

Haskell was warming up his Fronty Ford for qualification trials scheduled to begin at 10 o'clock. His machine fell about 50 feet from the top of the embankment. Haskell died from a fractured skull and crushed chest.

He had been driving about a year and a half for John Bagley, of Omaha, Neb. Surviving are the parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Haskell, of Lincoln, and a brother and sister. The body was removed to the Fraze funeral home and will be sent to Lincoln today.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, August 1, 1934

Died. --- Mrs. Elvira H. Hunt, 77, passed away last evening at 10 o'clock at her home 636 North State Line street after a short illness. She was the widow of the late Robert Hunt, and had lived in this city for a great number of years. The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral Home until the arrival of her sister from Indianapolis, Ind. Interment will take place in the Huntsville cemetery where her husband is buried.

[Funeral services were held at the Huntsville M. E. church at 2. p. m. Friday, Rev. Zelma Mills in charge. Interment in Huntsville Cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 2, 1934

Suicides. - Mike W. Cline ends his earthly career this morning at Greenville, O. - He was secretary of the Moose Lodge at Greenville, Ohio.

This morning Mike W. Cline, who is the Secretary of the Moose lodge, was found dead in his room at the Home Hotel in that city.

A noise was heard by persons in the hotel coming from his room and the door was locked. When entrance was gained Cline was found in agony and when a physician arrived he died. He had swallowed two ounces of carbolic acid.

He had seemed to be in good spirits and attended a ball game last night. It was known however that he had been out of work for sometime.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, August 3, 1934

Career Ended. - Attorney Walter Kessler passes away at his home at Arcanum, O. - Was one of Darke County's most prominent citizens.

Arcanum, O. --- Funeral services for Walter S. Kessler, 75 years old, prominent attorney in this section who died at his home on North Main street last night, will be held at the United Brethren church, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. G. R. Powell, assisted by Rev. Baker and Rev. Sinks, will officiate. Burial will be made in Tippecanoe City cemetery.

Mr. Kessler was a member of one of the best known families in Miami county. He was born near and resided at West Milton, O., for several years during which time he served as mayor. He was a member of the Mason lodge and of the local United Brethren church.

His survivors are: His widow, Della Mae; three daughters, Mrs. Ethel Miles and Mrs. Dora Hesselfinger, of West Milton, and Mrs. Helen Goodpasture, of Arcanum; a son, Arthur, of Indianapolis, Ind., and four brothers, Aaron, of Laura, O.; Wertz, of West Milton, Samuel of Anderson, Ind., and Calvin, of Dayton.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 6, 1934

Mother. - Of eight children passes away at her country home. - Mrs. Gertrude Byrum's death a shock to the community.

Mrs. Gertrude D. Byrum, 57, passed away at her home northwest of this city Sunday after a short illness.

She was the daughter of John and Fannie (Brooks) Johnson and was born in Darke county, January 28, 1877. She was united in marriage to Joseph M. Byrum, December 10, 1892.

The following survive, which include her husband and eight children: Mrs. George Noffsinger of northwest of this city, Russel Byrum of southeast of Winchester, George and Paul Byrum of Los Angeles, Cal., Lester Byrum of near this city, Irvin Byrum of Winchester, Garnet, wife of Henry Runkle of near this city and Ermal at home; two brothers, Coach and George Byrum of Dayton and 15 grandchildren. One daughter is deceased.

The body was removed to the Williamson and Son Shadow Lawn funeral home at Portland, Ind. and prepared for burial and will be removed to the home today. No funeral arrangements have been made pending word from the sons in California.

[Funeral services were to be held on Thursday afternoon from the Lisbon Church, with Rev. John A. Watson officiating. The funeral was postponed owing to the delay in the arrival of the two sons from California. The funeral was finally held on Sunday. Interment was in the Lisbon cemetery. The sons did arrive from California to attend the funeral.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 6, 1934

Death Calls. - Mrs. Milo Barr passed away Sunday morning at 9 o'clock. - daughter of Tom Teal, first Supt. Darke County Children's Home.

The news of the death of Mrs. Milo Barr was received here with great sorrow, for she was one of the splendid Christian women of the community whom we could ill afford to lose.

A long illness preceded her death and she was confined to her bed for a period of about seven months. Everything that medical science and the best of care could do for the patient was done and while she made a brave fight, all proved of no avail and the spirit took its flight into the realms of everlasting life and love Sunday morning, Aug. 5, 1934 at 9 o'clock.

Mrs. Olive (Teal) Barr was born Feb. 27, 1853 at Hillgrove, O., and she was the daughter of Tom and Ellen (Drouse) Teal.

Her father Tom Teal was one of the best known and highly esteemed men in Darke county. He was for years the postmaster at Hillgrove and he was the first superintendent of the Darke County Children's Home, a position he held for years with great honor to himself and the institution.

Mrs. Barr at a very early age on the death of her parents was given a home by her grandfather Farley of North Manchester, Ind. Here she received her school and at the age of 16 she began to teach school at North Manchester.

She was married to Milo Barr Oct. 2, 1898. After her marriage she taught the school at Hillgrove for two years.

She was a fine Christian woman and a member of the United Brethren Church, and during the days of her health, she was very active in all church work, and she was never appealed to in vain when help was needed or when work was needed to be done.

With it all she was a woman of refinement and culture, together with a gracious and pleasant personality, which made her beloved by all who knew her.

Her going has cast deep sadness over the community and she will be greatly missed and long remembered.

No children were born to her, and she had no brothers or sisters.

She is survived by the husband, Milo Barr, who is a brother of Thad Barr, of this city, and many friends, joined by the Evening Times, extend sincere sympathy to the grief-stricken husband in his irreparable loss.

The funeral will be held in the church at Hillgrove, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. Percy.

The burial will take place in the Greenville cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 6, 1934

Died. --- James S. Jennings, age 75, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edward Evans, northeast of Saratoga, at about ten o'clock Sunday morning. He is survived by his wife and five children: Della, wife of Edward Evans; Ottis Jennings; Mary, wife of James Slick; William E. Jennings; and Pearl, wife of Web Isenberger; twenty-two grandchildren and five great grandchildren survive. Funeral at the Grace Reformed Church at New Pittsburg Tuesday at 2 o'clock. Interment at Weimer cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, August 7, 1934

Passes Away. - Everett C. Dunn dies this morning at home of his mother. - Was an engineer on the Big Four railroad for a number of years.

Everett C. Dunn, 54, passed away at the home of his mother Mrs. Mary C. Dunn, 1139 W. Oak street this morning after an illness of several weeks. He was born and raised in this city and was an engineer on the Big Four railroad and his home was in St. Louis, Mo. He leaves one son, besides his mother. The remains were taken to the Fraze Funeral home where they will remain, until the funeral arrangements are completed, which will probably take place Thursday.

[Funeral services were held at the Dunn residence on Thursday, conducted by Rev. J. A. Watson. Interment in St. Louis, Mo.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 13, 1934

Laid To Rest. - Judge Adam Wise, a prominent citizen of Plymouth, Ind. - Served two terms in the state legislature.

Plymouth, Ind. --- Funeral services for Adam Wise, 66, prominent Plymouth attorney, who died in his home on Webster avenue last Thursday night at 10 o'clock was held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock in the Federated church, Rev. C. W. Sauerwein officiated. Mr. Wise, who had been ill several months is survived by his widow, Margaret (Ewald) Wise, whom he married in 1889; Four sons, Lochran, Birmingham, Ala.; Devore and Walton, Plymouth, and Russell, Union City, Ind. and one daughter, Mrs. Amelia Crowley, South Bend. Mr. Wise was born in 1868 on a farm three miles southwest of Plymouth. He attended Valparaiso university, Valparaiso, Ind., studying law and was admitted to the bar in 1891. For several years he taught school and practiced law after school years. In 1909 he was admitted to the supreme court of Indiana and the circuit court of the United States. Mr. Wise was twice elected to the state legislature, in 1897 and 1899.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, August 14, 1934

Passes Away. - Samuel M. Rust dies after a long illness. - Was the husband of Miss Ada Bowen, formerly of Union City.

Greenville, O. --- Samuel M. Rust, 72 years old, a retired local utilities executive, and prominent lodge and fraternal leader, died at his late home, 239 East Main street, at 9 p. m. Sunday following a prolonged illness. He had been bedfast for several days.

Mr. Rust, a native of Neville,[Clermont Co.] O., located in the southern part of the state, came to Greenville, nearly 30 years ago from Piqua and up until the past eight years was actively identified with the Greenville Electric Light and Power Company. He served as superintendent of the firm's power plant here for over 15 years.

He severed his connections with the light company at the time it was sold to the United Power Company in May, 1927, and since that time had lived retired.

Mr. Rust was a devout attendant of the M. E. church and was active in both Masonic lodge and Kiwanis club affairs. He was a member of the Scottish Rite at Dayton, and was a past president of the Kiwanis organization. He had also been an active member of the Greenville Country Club for several years.

Immediate surviving relatives include a daughter, Mrs. Robert [Jean] Wasmus, Columbus, Ohio; one grandson, and a sister, Mrs. W. F. Rice, Raton, New Mexico.

His wife died in October, 1916, and she was formerly Miss Ada Bowen, Union City, Ind. and the daughter of Mr. Frank Bowen now of Redkey, Ind.

Funeral service will be conducted from the late home at 2:30 p. m. Wednesday with the Rev. W. P. Clark, pastor of the Greenville Methodist church, officiating. Burial will be made in the city cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home records state that Samuel McMath Rust was born Apr. 16, 1862 at Neville, OH., the son of Wm. Rust (b. Batavia, OH) and Mary McMath (b. Neville, OH) His wife, Ada, died Oct. 16, 1918. She was b. June 1, 1884 She is buried in Greenville Cem.]

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, August 14, 1934

Died. - Mrs. Lydia A. Harnish, Monday Aug. 13, 1934 at the residence in Coletown, Ohio, aged 83 years. Funeral services will be held at the Coletown Church Wednesday at 2 p. m. Eastern Time, conducted by Rev. C. W. Hoeffer. Interment in Greenville Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 16, 1934

Death Calls. - Roll Gettinger, twin brother of Ross Gettinger, passes away. - Ill since early Spring and died in the Crane Sanitarium in Richmond.

Ross Gettinger, manager of the local branch of the Parent's Co-operative Marketing Association, received the sad message last night from Richmond, Ind., of the death of his twin brother Roll D. Gettinger, of Rural Route 5 a short distance north of the Wayne School building. He had been ailing since early spring of this year and his condition became alarming last week. Monday he was taken to the Crane Sanitarium in the hope of arresting the disease. However his end cam Wednesday, August 15, 1934 at 7:15.

Roll D. Gettinger was the son of David and Rachel (Shockney) Gettinger, and he was born July 16, 1872 on the old home place about a mile north of the Wayne school. He attended Wayne school and in 1896 uniting in marriage to Miss India Coats and one daughter was born to them, the present Mrs. Don Smith, residing southeast of Union City on the Parent farm. Mrs. India Gettinger died in 1898 and some years later Roll Gettinger was married to Estella (Estela) Mason, who with one daughter, Mrs. Katheryn Byrum survive him.

For some years Mr. Gettinger and family resided on South State Line, on the Sam Mote farm until about three years ago when Roll D. bought back the old home place and where he with his family resided until his death. Besides the above he is survived by another brother Henry Gettinger of Winchester, Ind.

Roll D. Gettinger was a man of fine character, honest and thrifty. He was always willing to do his share of any good of the community and as the result of his many good qualities he had many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the surviving relatives.

The funeral will take place Saturday at 2:30 p. m. from the First Christian Church in this city [Rev. John Watson officiating]. Burial will be in the Union City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 16, 1934

Mrs. Catherine Meier dies at Winchester.

Winchester, Ind. --- Mrs. Catherine Elizabeth Meier, 80, died at 5:30 o'clock Wednesday morning at her home here, following an illness of several months. She was a native of Ohio and had been a resident of Winchester for many years.

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Alice Werner, of Omaha, Neb., and Mrs. Alma Price and Mrs. Irene Davis, of Winchester; three sons, Loren G., of Mt. Pleasant, Texas, Clifford F., of Indianapolis, and Rev. R., of Long Beach, Cal.; three brothers, Dr. F. G. Keller, of Alexandria, H. J. Keller, of Muncie and G. N. Keller, of Winchester, and one sister, Mrs. Julia Prudey, of South Dakota.

Funeral services will be conducted at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon at the local Methodist Church in charge of the Rev. Mr. Teter, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Wilson. Burial will be in the Fountain Park Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, August 17, 1934

Curl Worth. - One of the best known men in two counties passes away. - The end came at 11:20 Thursday night following a stroke. - He was the oldest stock buyer in Randolph County.

The death of P. C. Worth, better known as Curl Worth, has caused a mantle of sorrow to settle not only over Union City but over the entire counties of Darke and Randolph for he was one of our best known men. As told about in the Times of Wednesday, Aug. 8, on that day at five o'clock in the morning he suffered a stroke of Apoplexy at his home 415 North Howard street. Though he had a splendid constitution his great age - he was 81 - was against him and while at first he seemed to yield to treatment his slight improvement was only temporary and his return to consciousness was only partial. The end came Thursday night at 20 minutes after 11 o'clock.

Peter Curl Worth was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Worth. His mother being an Ohian. He was born a short distance south of Springhill, on the old Worth home place July 25, 1853. He attended the famous old Springhill school and he was married to Miss Sarah J. Cantrell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Cantrell of South Salem July 25, 1881. Ten children were born to this union, seven of whom are living as follows: Mrs. Rhetta Brooks, of north of the city; Mrs. Emma Welch, of Ojai, Calif.; Fred Worth, of Old Castle; Mrs. Esther Hindsley, of Ft. Wayne, Ind.; Mrs. Marie Williams, of Indianapolis; Mrs. Jeanette Perkins, of Camden, O., and Harold Worth, of Muncie.

A son, Norman, died when eight years old and a daughter Claritta died at the age of 12. One daughter died in infancy.

Besides the above and the wife, the departed is survived by 16 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Also there are living the following three sisters: Mrs. Sarah Jane Adams, of Union City; Mrs. Elizabeth Adams, of New Madison, O.; and Mrs. Lydia Bickell, of near Dawn, O. Also there are three half-brothers, Tom Worth, who is ill and confined in the Union City hospital, I. N. Worth of Indianapolis and Geo. Worth of California.

Mr. Worth came to Union City in 1853 from Springhill where he bought stock for his father. He engaged in the stock buying business on his own account and was actively engaged in that business until about a year ago. He was therefore without doubt the oldest stockman in our two counties being one of a great company of old stock buyers of which he was one of the last surviving members including such well known names in their day as Bell Mason, T. W. Welch, John Shockney, Sam Hough and Jim Downing.

John Morton and Alva Downing, who also belonged to that circle, are still living.

Mr. Worth also was engaged in the grain business with the Old Pierce Elevator, farm implement business, operated a threshing machine and for 17 years he was in partnership with Curt K. Wright, deceased.

In his younger days P. C. Worth was a regular attendant at the Springhill Church and Sunday school and seldom missing a meeting and he lived the life of a real Christian gentleman.

Curl Worth was one of nature's noblemen, who lived a clean, upright, wholesome life. He was honest to the core and was the possessor of a pleasant personality. He was generous to a fault and he was never appealed to in vain for assistance in a good cause. He possessed great civic pride and took a great interest in civic affairs. He was also a man of splendid health and his big rugged genial presence was always welcome in any company. His friends therefore were legion. He will be sadly missed and long remembered for he helped to build up Union City. The Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the sorrowing relatives.

The funeral announcements will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Times.

Died --- P. C. Worth, aged 81 years, died at his residence, 411 North Howard St., this city, Thursday, Aug. 16, at 11:30 p. m. Funeral services will be conducted from the residence, Sunday at 2:30 p. m. in Charge of Rev. Wischmeier. Interment in the City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, August 17, 1934

Auto Crash. - Causes the death of a Darke County woman. - Mrs. Irwin Bayman dies instantly; three other women injured.

Greenville, Ohio. --- Mrs. Irwin Bayman, 76 years old, living on Rural Route 5 out of this city, was killed instantly last night and three other women who were riding in the same car with her were seriously injured in an automobile accident which occurred on Ohio 127 a few miles south of Greenville at about 6:30 o'clock.

Others in the car who were injured were Mrs. C. O. Bell, 54 years old, fractured pelvis, in serious condition; Mrs. Lucinda Williams, 52 years old, fractured ribs and bad lacerations about the face and arms, condition serious; and Mrs. M Stella Kissinger, 76 years old, had head lacerations, condition fair. The three, all residing on Rural Route 5 near Beamsville, were taken to the hospital here.

The four women were in a car driven by Mrs. Williams, returning from Lewisburg, Ohio. The car was entering Ohio 127 from a detour of Ohio 61 when it was struck by another automobile being driven south by Mrs. Rickter of Cincinnati, Ohio. The Williams car was driven into the path of the Rickter machine and was tossed from the road by the force of the crash and overturned. It was reported to have been demolished. The car driven by the Cincinnati woman was only slightly damaged in the front as it struck the other car broadside. Mrs. Rickter was uninjured as were her three small children who were accompanying her on a return trip from Pontiac, Mich.

Deputy Sheriff Harry Neisinger, who investigated the accident, did not hold Mrs. Rickter. He stated that he felt no blame could be attached to her fort the crash, as the other automobile had been driven from a side road into the path of her car.

Mrs. Bayman, a widow, is survived by one son, Calvin, at home.

[Miller Funeral Home records state that Belle Bayman was born August 28, 1860 in Richland Twp., Darke Co., the daughter of Abraham Miller and Emeline Plessinger. Burial was made in the Brick Cemetery, north of Union City.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 20, 1934

Second crash victim dies.

Greenville, O. --- Mrs. George Kissinger, 76, of Beamsville, died in the City hospital early Saturday morning from injuries she received in an automobile collision at Bruss Corner, near Arcanum, Thursday night. Mrs. Belle Bayman, also of Beamsville was killed in the accident.

Mrs. Kissinger is survived by three sons and four daughters: Alva, Daniel and Forest, who live near Versailles; Mrs. John Peiffer, of Springfield; Mrs. Willard Whitesell, of Dayton; Mrs. Chester Bickel, of West Alexandria, and Mrs. Victor Riggs, of Middletown.

Funeral services for Mrs. Kissinger will be held at the residence in Beamsville this afternoon at 2 p. m. Burial in the Greenville cemetery.

[Miller Funeral Home records state that Cordelia Kissinger was born May 17, 1858 in Beamsville, OH., the daughter of Daniel Kissinger and Cathrine Coppess, both born in Darke Co. It is reported here that she was buried on Aug. 20 in the Beamsville Cemetery. Her late husband, George, is also buried at Beamsville.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 23, 1934

Strangled on corn, Winchester boy dies.

Winchester, Ind. --- Shortly after eating an ear of corn at supper Wednesday evening at his home, 329 Pearl street, Charles Arthur Durham, nine years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Durham, died at Randolph county hospital from strangulation. A grain of corn, physicians said, lodged in his windpipe. The boy is survived by his parents and 10 sisters and brothers.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 23, 1934

Died. --- Word came to this city yesterday afternoon of the death of Mrs. Rebecca Harker, 77, at the home of her daughter in Muncie, Ind. She was the mother of Mrs. Albert DeLong of this city. The funeral will take place from the Methodist Church in Portland, Ind. tomorrow (Friday) at 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. Henry J. Wickersham. Interment in the Reitenour cemetery at Dunkirk.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, August 27, 1934

Mrs. May Parrish Jefferies.

Lynn, Ind. --- Funeral services for Mrs. May (Parrish) Jefferis was held at the Chester Methodist Episcopal Church Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock (C. S. T.). Rev. C. C. Collins had charge. Burial was made in the Willow Grove Cemetery at Fountain City.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, August 29, 1934

Died --- Dorothy Lee Burris, 2, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Burris, died at 9:30 o'clock yesterday morning at the home, 428 Main Street. She is survived by her parrents, two sisters, and one brother. The body was taken this morning from the Fraze funeral home to the Burris home where services will be held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon with the Rev. I. L. Erbaugh officiating. Interment will be in the Brethren Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, August 29, 1934

Called Home. - Mrs. M. A. Harlan dies at home of her daughter in Richmond, Ind. - Had been an active member of Union City Methodist Church for years.

Mrs. Flora Augusta Harlan, 71, widow of the late Rev. M. A. Harlan, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Roy M. Taylor, 39 South Eleventh St., in Richmond, Ind., Tuesday afternoon, where she had been making her home for the past six months and has been in failing health.

Mrs. Harlan was born in Momentz [Momence], Ill., and took an active part in religious affairs, especially in this city.

While her husband was pastor of the Portland, Ind. Methodist church, one of the finest and largest Methodist churches in the state was erected.

She was an active member of the Union City Methodist church Missionary Society and Sunday school as well as the local W. C. T. U. Society.

She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Roy Taylor of Richmond, Ind., Mrs. Harold Rohr of Indianapolis, Ind.; two sons, Fred French, Logansport, Ind.; Wilbur French, California; two brothers Ross Thayer, Chicago Heights, John Thayer of Detroit, Mich.

The funeral services will be held at 2:30 p. m. Thursday at the Unser & Wattermann Funeral Home at Richmond, Ind., conducted by Rev. A. C. Wischmeier of this city. Interment in the Earlham cemetery. Friends can view the remains at the Unser & Wattermann Funeral Home in Richmond, Ind.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, August 30, 1934

Died. --- The funeral of Earl Shives, 28, who died at the Greenville hospital as the result of being injured y a horse Tuesday will take place from the Waterhouse U. B. church Friday at 1:30 p. m. C. S. T., conducted by Rev. M. C. Wisely of Mooreland, Ind.

[Fisher-Oliver Funeral Home, Ansonia, Ohio records state that Earl M. Shives was born April 17, 1908 in Jackson Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of Charles Shives and Gertrude Poling (both born in Brown Twp., Darke Co.). He was married and his wife was the former Elenor Puterbaugh.]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, August 31, 1934

Injury Fatal. - Richard Steele auto wreck victim passed out this morning. - He developed pneumonia and probably internally injured.

Richard (Dick) Steele, one of the victims of the automobile wreck which occurred Wednesday on the Wayne and White River township line paid as the price of his ride with his life and he passed away this (Friday) morning at four minutes past 5 o'clock.

When the car he was in crashed through a telephone pole and was thrown across the township line road, Steele was caught in the wreck and it was apparent that he was seriously hurt. Besides a broken pelvis bone he was crushed through the body. An indication of the pressure his body had to undergo may be obtained when it is stated that a tin tobacco box which he carried in his breast pocket was mashed flat. There isn't much doubt but what he sustained internal injuries besides the fractured pelvis.

To make matters worse he contracted pneumonia and his fight for life became a hopeless battle.

Richard Stephen Steele was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Addison (Ad) Steele and he was born in Union City April 6, 1915. His father, the well known "Ad" Steele died two years ago.

Richard attended the Union City school and he graduated with the class of 1933. During his last two years of high school he put in all of his spare time as a clerk in the Veit Meat Market and he was employed there at the time of his death. He was a good employee, faithful and honest and his employers speak highly of his services.

He was a member in good standing of the First Christian church. He also belonged to the Senior Young People's class of the church and was a regular attendant of the meetings. He was a member of the young men's club during the club's existence.

He was a bright cheerful lad very popular in a large circle of friends who are cast down in sorrow over the young man's untimely death.

The Times desires to join in extending to the grief-stricken mother and two sisters sincere sympathy in their great loss of an only son and brother.

Besides the above he is survived by his grandmother, Mrs. H. H. Fernsler, of near Nashville, two uncles, C. E. Fernsler and Harry Fernsler, three aunts, Mrs. H. N. Spencer, Mrs. John Throp, of Nashville, Mrs. Barbara Phillips of Dakota and several cousins.

The funeral will take place Monday at 2 p. m.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 4, 1934

Passes Away. - James A. Hanlin, formerly of this city, dies Friday. - Was for years in the grocery business in Union City.

Word came to this city Saturday morning announcing the death of James A. Hanlin, 96, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Geo. W. Clark in Indianapolis, Ind., where he has been spending the summer, his home being in St. Cloud, Florida, where he has lived since leaving Union City, where he was in the grocery business for a number of years, which is now operated by Ira Mundbank.

The deceased was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Hanlin, and at the time of his death had reached the advanced age of 96 years, 5 months and 8 days. He was united in marriage to Phoebe Isenhart, who preceded him in death in 1911. He is survived by the daughter at whose home he died; one son, Perry E. Hanlin, of Hampton, Virginia; a sister, Mrs. Harry VanKirk, of Portland.

As a young man the deceased lived with his parents on a farm north of Fort Recovery. Besides being a farmer, he taught school for a number of years, later engaging in the grocery business. He enlisted for service in the Civil war, serving with Company D, 17th Ohio Volunteers.

Following the death of his wife he lived with relatives in Fort Recovery for some time. He was a member of the Fort Recovery Congregational church at the time of his death.

Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon from the home of a sister-in-law, Mrs. Priscilla Stone, at Fort Recovery. Rev. J. C. Etter was in charge. Interment was made in Green Mound cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, September 5, 1934

Mother Dies. - Rev. Ira Clark received bad news of mother's death. - Mrs. Wm. Clark passes away at her home in Greenville last night.

Rev. Ira Clark of the United Brethren church received the sad message last night of the death of his mother, Mrs. Wm. Clark who passed away at her home in Greenville, O. Tuesday night at 20 minutes after 11 o'clock. Mrs. Clark had been an invalid for the past two years. Her husband preceded her to the Land of rest and peace two years ago.

Mrs. Clark was a fine example of American Christian womanhood and noble mother who lived for her family and she was highly honored and respected in her community.

She was the mother of seven children, all of whom survive her as follows: Ira Clark, of Union City, Alonzo Clark of Greenville, Mrs. Joseph Keever, of Greenville, Mrs. Roy Young, Mrs. Webster Clark and Fred Clark, all of Dayton, and Clyde Clark who resided with his mother.

Besides the above she is survived by eight grandchildren.

Funeral announcements will be made later.

Next Issue --- The funeral of Mrs. Weltha Ann Clark, 75, mother of Rev. Ira Clark of this city, who died at her home in Greenville, O. after a lingering illness Thursday, will take place from the Greenville, O. Christian Church at 2:30 p. m. E. S. T. Friday. Burial will take place in the Greenville Cemetery.

Friends of the deceased may view the remains at the Turpen-McKnight funeral home in Greenville, O. on West Fourth Street at any time.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, September 5, 1934

Died. --- Mrs. Catherine Grady died at her home in Dunkirk, Ind. Monday evening. The funeral mass will be held at the St. Mary's Catholic church in Dunkirk, Ind. Thursday morning at 9 o'clock conducted by Father Rerck. Burial will take place in the St. Mary's Cemetery in Union City, Ind. Mrs. Grady was a sister-in-law of Mrs. Reagen of this city.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, September 6, 1934

Brave Fight. - Put up by Marvin Heuss for his life proved of no avail. - He crossed the great divide last evening at five minutes after six.

While no hope was entertained for the life of Marvin Heuss, from the beginning after his terrible fall from the Fowler barn near New Lisbon, last Friday afternoon, yet he put up such a brave and wonderful fight that it was hoped that the impossible might happen.

At first it was thought that he would not live the first night through, and then to the amazement of all he lived on for five full days and actually regained partial consciousness, due to his splendid health and physical condition.

But it seems that the end was only delayed, and Marvin Heuss crossed the Great Divide Wednesday evening at five minutes after six o'clock.

Marvin Paul Heuss was the [oldest] son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Heuss, of about three miles southwest of the city and he was born April 15, 1896, he was therefore 38 years of age at death.

He was born on the Veit farm south of the city and he attended number 5 school, and later the Wayne school, from which he graduated with the class of 1916.

He was among the first to answer his country's call in the world war, and he served twenty-two months, nine months of that time in France.

When he returned from the war he worked on the Kuert construction gang for two years.

He was married June 16, 1928 to Miss Dora Mae Barrick, of Martinsville, Ind., at Lima, O. The newly married couple moved to the Sam Mote farm, two miles south on the State Line, where he resided until his death. He is survived by the widow, who herself is ill and in a very serious condition, and one daughter, Margot Ellen, aged four.

Marvin Heuss was a splendid type of Christian young manhood, and was a lifelong member of the Lutheran church in which faith he was baptized and confirmed. He was an active member of the Men's Society of the church. He was also a member of the American Legion in which he was elected to be installed as first vice-commander, in this present month.

He was a clean young man normally and physically, and he lived a good life. Naturally then, he made many friends who will deeply mourn his untimely death, and the Times joins them in extending heart-felt sympathy to the heart-broken wife and little daughter and to the surviving parents.

Besides the above he is survived by one sister, Mrs. Florence Sipe, of north of Union City, two brothers, Walter Heuss, south of Union City, and Herman Heuss, who lives on the Fred Roe farm, south of the country club. Also one uncle, Fred Veit, and two aunts, Mrs. Henry Veit and Mrs. Fred Veit, and several cousins.

Complete arrangements for the funeral have not yet been completed but it will probably be held Saturday at 2 p. m. from the Marvin Heuss home on South State Line, conducted by Rev. H. A. Barth.

[A report of the funeral services was published on Monday but no actual date of the service was given. It was probably on Saturday. He was buried in the Union City Cemetery.]

[From an obituary published on Friday, Sept. 21st. - Early Wednesday morning just one week after the death of her husband, Mrs. Dora M. Heuss was called home to be reunited, we are certain, with him she dearly loved, to blessed eternity. Mrs. Heuss, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Barrick, was born at Auburn Ind. March 11, 1902. At the early age of 13 her mother was taken by death, after which she with her father and three brothers lived for a short time at Greensburg, Ind. Later they moved to Martinsville, Ind. Here she grew into womanhood. Her father's second marriage gave her a second mother, whose memory she cherished until the day of her death. About eight years ago her step-mother was also called home. In June 1923 Miss Barrick was united in marriage to Marvin P. Heuss of this place. Mr. Heuss's employment with a R. R. construction company, took them to various places in Indiana and Ohio. In the spring of 1928 Mr. and Mrs. Heuss moved to a farm south of Union City, when Mrs. Heuss became interested in the Lutheran church. On July 22, 1928 she was received into full membership of the church to which she remained faithful. Her connection with the church gave her real satisfaction, especially during the days of her illness and accidental death of her husband.

Mrs. Heuss had been ailing for several months. A year ago in August she underwent an operation but the dread disease could not be checked.

She bore her suffering with great patience, seemingly more concerned about her husband and daughter than herself. When the end came she reconciled to her God, casting all her cares upon Him who careth for her, her orphaned child and her loved ones she leaves behind.

Besides the orphaned child, Margot, aged four, she leaves her father, Isaac Barrick, three brothers, Ben of Bloomington, Ind., Arthur and Romey of near Martinsville, Ind. and their families, her husband's relatives, L. P. Heuss and family and a host of other relatives and friends who deeply mourn her early departure.

May it be said of us as it was of the Mary who anointed her Master, "We have done what we could." and

"Now lay me calmly in the grave. This form whereof no doubt we have. That it shall rise up again that day, In glorious triumph o'er decay." ]

[No date or place of burial was given but surely she had to be buried in the Union City cemetery next to her husband.]

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, September 6, 1934

Funeral. - Of Harry C. Willis takes place in this city this afternoon. - Was a prominent real estate man in Dayton, Ohio.

The funeral services for Harry C. Willis, 72, who died at the Miami Valley hospital in Dayton, Ohio, Tuesday afternoon, took place this afternoon from the Church of the Brethren conducted by Rev. O. O. Arnold. He had been in the real estate business for many years in Dayton, O., and was an officer in the I. O. O. F. lodge.

He leaves his widow, Lucy C. Willis; three daughters, Mrs. Pearl Morter of Dayton, Mrs. Emma Appel of Dayton and Mrs. Blanche Clifton of Columbus; one son, Roy; seven grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 7, 1934

Hit by train. - Frank Shively, Greenville store owner, in fatal accident. - Preoccupied and walked into the side of the moving cars.

A very peculiar and unusual fatal accident occurred at Greenville at 6:22 this morning when Frank Shively, 52, prominent citizen and owner of the Progress Clothing store in Greenville, was killed.

Shively was walking toward the railroad crossing on Harrison street, when he for some reason which will never be known, became so preoccupied that he failed to note or see that a train was passing, and he walked right into the swiftly moving cars.

He was thrown back from the train with such force as to dislocate his neck, and he died at the hospital in less than two hours after the accident.

The widow and one daughter survive. Mr. Shively was the grandson of Wm. C. Elston, deceased, who was one of the owners of the Union City Carriage Works and resided here for many years.

[Miller Funeral Home records state that Frank E. Shively was born March 22, 1882 in Washington Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of D. W. Shively and Ida Elston, both also born in Washington Twp. His widow was not identified. He was buried on Sept. 10th in the Greenville Cemetery.]

[A later report from the Coroner Raymond J. Marker, Versailles, stated the cause of death was "apparent suicide."]

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 7, 1934

Michael Harrigan dead.

Michael Harrigan, 62, of Dayton, O., who formerly lived in this city, died at his home Thursday. The funeral services will be held at the Holy Angel Catholic church in Dayton, O., Saturday morning and interment will take place in the St. Mary's Catholic cemetery in this city. He is survived by his wife, one grandson, a brother John of this city and two sisters, Mary and Margaret, of this city.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 10, 1934

Damon Surface dead.

Damon Surface, formerly of this city, and who operated a bus line between this city and Richmond, Ind., passed away at his home in Lynn, Ind., Sunday morning at 10 o'clock.

[Where did the name Damon come from? This was the death of Amos Frank Surface according to the LDS web site.]

[Funeral services for Amos Surface were conducted on Wednesday at 1:30 o'clock at the Friends Church conducted by Rev. Ira Johnson and Rev. Peirson. Interment was made in the Winchester cemetery.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 10, 1934

Called Home. - Mrs. Belle Crawford dies at her home Sunday evening. - Was a victim of pneumonia for past two weeks.

Mrs. Belle Crawford, 68, passed away at her home on South Columbia St., Sunday evening following a two weeks illness of pneumonia.

She was in the restaurant business in this city, where she had spent practically all of her life and was one of our most beloved and true Christian women, and a life-long member of the Christian church.

Besides her husband, she leaves the following children: Omer, Alva and George, of this city; Florence Crawford, Mrs. Roy Best, Mrs. Arthur Skiver and Mrs. Carl Cummings of this city and Mrs. Loris Maze of Hillgrove, O.

The remains were removed to the Fraze Funeral Home where they will remain, pending funeral arrangements.

Died. --- Mrs. Laura Belle Crawford, wife of Phillip Crawford, Sunday, Sept. 9, 1934, at 8:30 p. m., at the residence, 223 S. Columbia St., aged 64 years. The body was removed to the Fraze Funeral Home. Funeral services will be held at the Funeral Home, Wednesday at 3 p. m. Interment in the City Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 11, 1934

Passes Away. - Mrs. John McConnell is dead at her home in Anderson, Ind. - Was a former resident of Union City, Ind. and a true Christian woman.

The following taken from the Anderson, Ind. Herald will prove of interest to many of the older residents of this city:

"Mrs. Catherine Eliza McConnell, age 85, resident of this city for many years, died Thursday at 6:30 p. m. at the family home 1408 West Sixth street following an illness of several months.

"Mrs. McConnell was born in 1849 in Ludwigeberg, Germany. She came to the United States in 1852.

"Surviving are four children, Robert McConnell and Mrs. Adna Lambert, of Anderson; Mrs. Grace McCurdy, Indianapolis; Ted George McConnell of Springfield, O.; five grandchildren, Arthur Lambert, Lake Worth, Fla.; Mrs. Opal Crowder, of Indianapolis; Mrs. Mary Charlotte McConnell and Dan and John McConnell, of Glendale, Calif., and one great grandchild, Mary Jane Lambert, of Lake Worth, Fla.

"Funeral services were held Sunday at 2 p. m. at the First U. B. Church with Rev. H. L. Lanahan, pastor, in charge. Burial was in Maplewood."

Mrs. McConnell, was the wife of the late John McConnell, who lived on N. Plum street in this city and operated a blacksmith shop here.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 11, 1934

Victim. - Of an auto accident was Herbert Teegarden at Los Angeles, Calif. - He formerly lived in this city and died this morning.

Word came to this city this morning, announcing the death of Herbert Teegarden at his home in Los Angeles, California this morning.

He was in an automobile accident and died as a result of injuries received. He was the son of John Teegarden of Indianapolis, Ind., and a nephew of Jed Teegarden of this city and lived in this city about ten years ago and was employed by Jed Teegarden. He later moved to Anderson, Ind., and then to California where he married the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Armstrong, who was formerly connected with the Knapp Supply Co. of this city. No funeral arrangements have been made.

[From Sept. 18th. issue: Herbert Teegarden was the son of John C. Teegarden of Indianapolis, well known here and the son-in-law of Mrs. Granville Reynard. He was well known and highly honored as a citizen and business man in Los Angeles.

He was also well known in Union City, having visited here with is father, J. C. Teegarden and wife, nee Miss Florence Reynard, on several occasions. Mrs. Herbert Teegarden was formerly Miss Esther Armstrong, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Armstrong. Friends here extend sympathy to the surviving widow who will continue to reside in Los Angeles.]

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, September 12, 1934

Died. --- Mrs. Margaret Cashman, at the Heeman home, five miles east of Union City, at four o'clock a. m., September 11, 1934, aged 91 years.

Funeral services will be conducted from St. Mary's church, Thursday morning at nine o'clock in charge of Rev. Michael Shea.

Burial at Montpelier, Indiana.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, September 13, 1934

Passes Away. - John C. Byrne answers last call Wednesday at 9:55 p. m. - He had lived in Union City more that 50 years.

John C. Byrne, one of our well-known and respected citizens answered the last call last night Wednesday. He was taken ill two weeks ago becoming steadily worse and the end came at five minutes to 10 o'clock.

John C. Byrne was born in Ireland, April 24, 1856 and was a fine example of the sturdy stock which has meant so much to America.

When a young man he was married to Miss Mary Carr who preceded him to the better world about three years ago.

Mr. and Mrs. Byrne moved to Scotland where they resided for a year after which they moved to America settling in Leadville, Colo. They moved to Union City over 50 years ago and Mr. Byrne made his home for the rest of his life.

For many years he held a position of trust with the Union City Wheel Co. and was with them until the Wheel Co. went out of business. For the next 12 years he has been living a retired life at his home 527 North Union street. John Byrne was a good Christian and a life-long member of the Catholic Church. He was also a member of the Knights of Columbus.

He was honest and industrious and he lived for his family. Many friends will mourn his death and the Times wishes to join them in extending sympathy to the surviving members of the family, which include the following sons and daughters: John C. of Union City, James Byrne of Bicknell, Ind., Edward P. Byrne, of Greenville, O., Robert Byrne of Hartford City, Charles Byrne of Evansville, Ind., Mrs. Leo Koontz and Miss Frances Byrne of Union City. One daughter, Anna, died when she was 18 years of age. There are seven grandchildren. Also three brothers, Daniel, Thomas and Edward of Spalding, Neb. and one sister, Mrs. Patrick Hawley of Greeley, Neb.

The funeral announcement will be found elsewhere in this paper.

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Union City Evening Times, Thursday, September 13, 1934

Died. --- Miss Margaret Walden received a telegram stating that James Erwin died at his home in Colfax, Wash, aged 95. He was a soldier of the Civil War and was formerly a well-known Union City businessman, operating what is now the Weimer Grocery. He was a great lover of horses and owned the finest matched team of bays in the city. Old friends here will regret to learn of his death.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 14, 1934

Died. --- Word comes to this city today of the death of Mrs. James Horney at her home in Wilmington, Calif., Sunday. Her husband, James, is still alive but in very bad health. They formerly lived in this city, where Mr. Horney was in the buggy business and was the City Clerk of this city. Mrs. Horney was a sister of the late Rev. Matt Harlan and they moved from this city to Cannon City, Colo. and later to California.

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Union City Evening Times, Tuesday, September 18, 1934

Orville Arnold dead.

Greenville, O. --- Funeral services for Orville Arnold, local race driver who died at the Greenville Hospital Friday evening from injuries received in a test run at the local speedway earlier in the evening, will be conducted from the Central Avenue Church of the Brethren at 2 p. m. Monday. Interment will be in the Manuel Cemetery near Coletown.

Surviving relatives include his mother, Mrs. Emma Arnold, with whom he resided at 207 Anderson Ave., seven sisters and two brothers. The brothers and sisters are: Arthur and Granville, Greenville, Mrs. David Vanatta and Mrs. Millard Spitler, Phillipsburg, Ohio; Mrs. Richard Stocksdale, Hillgrove; Mrs. Esther Midlam, Union City; Mrs. Hazel Geragosian, Cleveland, Ruth and Helen, at home.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, September 19, 1934

Harry E. Marshall dead.

Winchester, Ind. --- Harry E. Marshall, 49 years old, died at his home four miles southeast of Lynn, Tuesday at 6 a. m.

Surviving are the widow, Lucille, one brother, Ollie D. Marshall of Richmond; one sister, Florence Wessell of Lynn; two half-sisters, Elizabeth Kohlinbrink and Pauline Cutter, both of Richmond.

Funeral services will be held Friday at 2 p. m. at the home in charge of Rev. Ira Johnson. Burial will be in the Arba Cemetery.

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Union City Evening Times, Wednesday, September 19, 1934

James Young dead.

Greenville, Ohio --- Funeral services for James M. Young, 65 years old, well known Darke County farmer, who died at his home, one-half mile west of Woodington, Ohio at 6 a. m. Tuesday, will be conducted from the Fort Jefferson Methodist Episcopal Church at 2:30 p. m. Thursday, Rev. C. W. Hoeffer will officiate. Interment will be made in the Fort Jefferson Cemetery.

Surviving relatives include a widow, two daughters and four sons.

Death resulted from an extended illness climaxed by a paralytic stroke two weeks ago.

[Miller Funeral Home records state the James Monroe Young was born Sept. 29, 1869 in Greenville Twp., Darke Co., OH, the son of William Young (b. Pickaway Co., OH) and Lucinda Moyer. His spouse was Catharine (McKee) Young.]

[ The sons and daughters were: John, of Baltimore, Md., Cloyd of Ft. Jefferson, Charles, of Union City RR3, Guy, of Greenville RR3, Mrs. Gladys Burdsell, Ft. Jefferson and Mrs. Herbert Schaar of Weaver Station.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 24, 1934

Wm. J. Hook. - Answers the call of the Grim Reaper Sunday afternoon. - For many years a citizen of Union City which he helped to build up.

Rich in years and rich in achievement, William J. Hook answered his maker's call Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. During his long life, lacking only 10 years to round out the century mark, he kept his vitality and the use of his faculties to within a comparatively short time before the sands of time ran out.

William J. Hook was born in Montreal, Canada, August 15, 1844, being the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Hook, who were born in Glouchester, England.

He with his parents first located at Troy, New York but soon emigrated to Wisconsin and then came to Indiana in 1889. His father was a cooper, who died in 1885, his widow survived until 1895.

Mr. Hook was educated in the common schools of Wisconsin, and with his brother, Charles S. Hook, entered business when only 16 years old.

He went to Cardington, O. where he was married to Mary J. St. John, and to them eight children were born. In 1868 he began the manufacture of wooden ware with his brother Chas. S. Hook. In 1877 he came to Union City and located in the same kind of business on the East Side of our city, the factory becoming known far and wide as the Hook Brothers Buttertub factory and it built up a nation-wide business. This business was continued until 1898 when the plant was destroyed by fire.

About twenty years ago he moved to Oak Park, Ill. and with the exception of summers in Union City spent most of the last ten years of his life in St. Petersburg, Fla., with his son Warren S. Hook.

After the death of Warren, Mr. Hook came to reside with his son Charles in the old family home, 609 North Howard street. He was a staunch Republican in politics and a member of the Baptist church.

William J. Hook was held in respect and highest esteem by his fellowmen and his parting marks the going of a man who did much for its upbuilding of the city of his adoption and this added to his many deeds of kindness, tho but little known, will cause him to be long remembered as a benefactor and a good citizen.

He is survived by one son Charles S. Hook and two daughters, Mrs. Charles Pier, wife of a former pastor of the local Presbyterian church, and Mrs. Mary Simms. Also five grandchildren.

The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home on North Howard street.

[Interment was made in the Union City Cemetery. Arrangements by the Fraze Funeral Home.]

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 24, 1934

High Tribute. - Paid to memory of Joe Gruber by Rev. Father M. Shea. - The funeral was held this morning from St. Mary's Church.

The funeral of Joseph Gruber was held this morning from St. Mary's church, and many friends were present and the flowers were profuse and very beautiful.

The children's choir and adult choir of the church combined with Miss Edithe Voisinet at the organ a Gregorian requiem and two lovely numbers were the Sancta Maria from Shubert's Ava Maria sung by request, and "Lead Kindly Light," sung by Mrs. Raymond A. Voisinet.

The services were conducted by Rev. Father Michael Shea, who paid a high tribute to the memory of the departed. He called attention to the prayer in vogue in the Catholic church, "From sudden and unprovided death, O Lord, deliver us," and said that while Joseph Gruber's death was sudden it was by no means "unprovided," for Joseph Gruber lived a Christian life and was ready and unafraid to faced his Maker at any time. He spoke of the many fine qualities of the departed as a husband, father, citizen, and Christian gentleman.

At the close of the services the following pall bearers carried the handsome casket to the funeral car: Jack Wallace, Martin Koontz, Charles Koontz, John Byrne, Frank Stack, Frank Haselmire.

The funeral cortege wended the way out to the pretty St. Mary's cemetery where the remains were laid to rest.

Joseph Gruber was Union City's oldest citizen and he was one of the first white children to be born in Union City. He was born March 19, 1856, in a frame house which stood squarely on the State Line, where the Hunt Manufactory now stands., so it was a question whether Joseph was born in Indiana or Ohio. When the State Line road and street was put through, the building was moved over west to the Indiana side, where it stood for many years.

Joseph attended the parochial school, and April 14, 1879, he was married to Emma Jane Stewart. The following children survive: Attorney Earl F. Gruber, of Frankfort, Ind.; Mrs. Loretta Rhatican, Mrs. A. L. Nelson, Detroit, Mich.; Mrs. Arthur H. Hayes, of New York City. Three children died when young, namely: Louis, aged 14 months, Mary, aged four years, and Joseph, Jr., died in infancy.

The life of Joseph Gruber is practically the history of Union City, for he saw it grow from a small village to the present fine city it is and toward which Joseph Gruber did his share.

When a very young man he learned the harness making trade at which he worked for some years, a part of which time he with his partner, Mr. Isenhour, conducted a shop.

He gave up the harness business to enter the coal and wood business on Sycamore street. He also engaged in the cigar business.

In 1910 he was appointed on the city police force, and he served faithfully and well for eight years.

The next place of trust which he held was as night watchman of the Union City Carriage Works, until it ceased to exist in 1925.

He was always genial and honest to the core. His death will be mourned by many friends whom the Times joins in extending sincere sympathy to the surviving members of the family. He is also survived by eight grandchildren.

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Union City Evening Times, Monday, September 24, 1934

Former resident dies in Arizona.

A message has been received here announcing the death in Arizona of Vernon Baker. Mr. Baker was well known here and a former resident of this community but has been living for several years at Parker, Ind. Owing to failing health he went to Arizona two years ago and his death occurred there Saturday morning.

Mr. Baker was a nephew of Albert Baker, a prominent stock raiser five miles northeast of Union City and a cousin of Mrs. LeRoy Mote. The remains will be brought to Parker for burial and funeral services will be held there Tuesday. Mr. Baker and son and Mr. and Mrs. Mote will attend the funeral services on Tuesday.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 28, 1934

Died --- Word came to this city last evening announcing the death of William H. McNeese, at his home at Sidell, Ill. yesterday noon. He was the father of Everett McNeese of this city, who with his wife left immediately for that city where the funeral will take place Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock.

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Union City Evening Times, Friday, September 28, 1934

Sad Death. - Mrs. Fay Burkett passes away following an operation. - She was taken suddenly ill at her home yesterday.

The news of the death of Mrs. Fay Burkett, which occurred this morning about eleven o'clock, was a great shock to the community for she was a young woman of fine character, and was popular in a large circle of friends. She was in apparently good health up until yesterday morning. She grew rapidly worse and she was on the verge of convulsions when it was found that the only hope left was an operation which was performed this morning.

However, owing to her condition, her vitality had sunk to such a low level that she could not recover, and at a few minutes to eleven o'clock her spirit took its flight.

Mrs. Fay Burkett was formerly Miss Frances Fernsler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Coy Fernsler, of South State Line road. She was a bride of only a few months and was married to Fay Burkett last April and she was only twenty-two years of age.

Many friends will mourn her death and the Times joins them in extending heartfelt sympathy to the heart broken young husband and sorrow stricken relatives.

Funeral announcements later.

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