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A PIONEER HISTORY
of
Wayne Tp., Darke County, Ohio
by
Samuel Long
1901
Table of Contents
pages [3]-5  pages 6-9  pages 10-13  pages 14-17  pages 18-21  pages 22-25  pages 26-29
pages 30-33  pages 34-37  pages 38-41  pages 42-45  pages 46-49  pages 50-53  pages 54-57
Surname Index

PIONEER HISTORY

      of old time, the chill matter suggests the milk sick or milk poison, so called because the people got the ailment from using milk and butter of cows that grazed in the woods of unplowed lands. How the cows, cattle, and other domestic animals got it, no one never knew, so as there are those, now who say they do not believe in the existence of a matter, they do not understand, so there were then those, who said there were no such thing as milk sick. But there was. People from the use of milk and butter of cows grazing as aforesaid, turned deathly sick, trembled like an aspen leaf, and vomited like a turkey buzzard. It was quite fatal. Many died from the ailment, and those who did recover from a severe attack, carried the mark, in an impaired constitution, till the day of their death. There was a sad affair relative to a German, imigrant family as relates to the milk sick, that of the Kley family. Becoming sick with this ailment all of the family died but their young lad, Lewis, who was left orphan, and stranger lone, far from "Fader" land and relatives. He found a home and friend in the home of Modest Taylor, and the sequel was not sorrow but joy, for he married Taylor's good daughter, Huldah, and is one of our most honored citizens, and owner of considerable wealth as the result of their own industry. What was remarkable, furthermore about the milk sick, it is said, you could never catch up with the settlement where it was prevalent. It was always in the one just adjacent.
      John Hughes was west of Eli Marker, owning a quarter section. He had no offspring, but he and his wife, Cyntha, reared three orphan girls, Lavina Grandstaff, Cyntha and Katurah Cavender. The family was well known and remembered. Jacob Miller was over to the east from Hughes toward Swamp creek. He was an old Virginian and his son, Zachariah, was the oldest of the pioneer boys, the oldest of the family, and now the oldest man in the township. Of the children there were John, Jacob, Ham, Jesse, Catharine, Elizabeth, Sophia, and Ann Rebecca. They were well known citizens of the period of which we write,and some of them later on. Of this generation there are still a few families remaining.

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PIONEER HISTORY

Joseph Begien was near Miller but out further on the western border. He was a French immigrant. Of his family there were Joseph, Mrs. G. S. Simon, and Mrs. Francois Bourquin, well known and estimable citizens. Of the lineage there is a goodly number, well known citizens.
      Sabastain Doutcore purchased what is known as the old Jacobi farm adjacent to Bayman westward. He was of the first arrivals of the French immigrants, and reputed to be of royal blood. Of the family was Sabastian, Mary Ann, and Phelista. There are none of the name hereabouts. John G. Begien coming shortly after Doutcore, purchased lands further down the stream south of Bayman. Of this Begien family were Francis, George, Joseph, Husten, Mary, and Elizabeth, and of the lineage there are a number of citizens. Lachia was on the west of John G. Begien,, owning one half of a quarter section, and was a French immigrant. Of this family there were Nicholas, Ramey, Frank, Mary, and Catharine. There was a successive family lineage though there are none in the township. Cemer Craig lived upon and owned the elder Atchison farm whose son-in-law he was, and the burial of whose body we have before mentioned, lying north of the cemeteries and west of the elder Brandon. He was a Baptist preacher and pastor of the Baptist congregation. This suggests to my pen


The Baptists and The Christian Primitive Church.

      So I stand near the clay bank of the old creek, whose waters, once murky and sometimes with vernal scum o're spread, but now rippling clear, fed by many springs, flow over pebbles and sand adown its channel, by art straighter and deeper made, the pensive vale beyond and to the east, hearing, not the sounds of hooting owl or the wild turkey's call, but the steam "enjine's" puff, the rattling of the railway train, or the tingling music of the telephone wires; me thinks I stand on hallowed ground, for, looking to the east near by is Dr. Gordon's residence, by the side of which, embeded in

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PIONEER HISTORY

earth, yet lies the foundation stone of the old Baptist church building, the first of early days, though erected there, the second time, and looking westward, not far, to the white silent city of the dead where lies in many a mouldering heap the ashes of the forefather's of the hamlet, or soldier of the war of '12 or '61, of young maiden's form or that of babe, there stood the old log church of those who themselves Christians called. Pioneer history would not be complete without special mention of these; for, during the first decade or more, they constituted the entire populace, and throughout the first half of the century, the period of which we write, they were the leading religious factors of the community. The Baptists were predestinarians while, the others were of the free will notion; one put the emphasis on "amazing grace, how sweet the sound," the others on "I'm a soldier of the cross," and the pros and cons of the "amazing grace," and the pronoun "I" as a factor, was fully, freely, and frequently discussed. Sometimes the "Big Guns" came, and then a great deal was said about theos and logos, and lexican and grammar. Sometimes it resulted in a public debate, that resulted in a complete victory on both sides and each speaker's leaving off, as Webster had John Adams to do, "as I began; sink or swim, survive or perish." The Baptists received members on confession of experience of "amazing grace," and then baptized the penitent in much water by immercing or dipping therein.
      Dr. Gordon tells the following as having come to his knowing by tradition: An old neighbor, not very thrifty or energetic, while the Baptists as a rule were, came to church to join them ... He arose and made the following confession: "As I was coming along this morning, I saw a great big tree. Could one yoke of oxen pull up that tree, ah! No, ah! could five yoke! No, ah! could ten, or twenty yoke! No, ah!" and the old brother sat down. Whereupon the old preacher said, "Brethern, receive that brother into the fold, for that was the blate of the Lord's lamb." Gordon says he could not see much in that confession, but he is only an M. D., but any well trained D. D. can see that it meant deepest faith in the omnipotence of God. The Christians received their members on confession of faith that the Lord

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PIONEER HISTORY

was with them in the fight. They took the Bible with each with each member's right of interpretation, and so were called "New Lights" as they had no standard creed. Of course each denomination was founded by Missionaries or Traveling Evangelists, but the local and resident preachers were, of the Baptists old Mr. Peters, Cemer Craig, John McDonald and of the Christians were Richard Brandon, Steven Long and Joshua and James Greer, and James Atchison of whom Craig and R. Brandon led in the pastorate. The Baptist builded the first church in Jacksonvllle on the lot in late years bought by the Catholic people, and, refitted, was the first chapel of that people in the village. Baptist membership having removed to other parts or passed to the beyond. It was a frame and high arched building and quite a structure of its day, and there the populace came, and worshiped. But the New Lights remained out at the church yard, but about the mid-fifties purchased a lot in town and bullded a brick structure where they worshiped for many years, and the substantial and comodious church building, now standing, succeeded it.

Onward the 0ld Pioneer Trail Goes.

      Craig was succeeded in ownership to this farm by Benjamin Resor, a Pennaylvania Dutchman and a good farmer. Of the family were Henry, Cymian, Tobe, John, Tillie, and other girls, who were well known citizens. Resor sold his farm to one Mr. Lenach, it is said because of the coming of the railway. It was in turn owned by Cushner, his son-in-law, and afterward purchased by and known as the Sheffel farm. There are a few of this lineage In the township. Craig and his family were well known and purchased, and cleared up a quarter section north of Baker and Charles Hole. He died many years ago, and the descent is chiefly in the vicinity of Celina. David Sakers was west of Craig on a lease. He was the primitive shoe-maker of the whole Swamp Creek Settlement of those who wore leather shoes, for wooden shoes and moccasins were not in these days a strange or unknown article. Here came the old pioneers with the family foot-measures, and his bundle of uppers and sole leather, or David went to the house of the pioneers and took the measures and homeward went with the raw material to manufacture the goods. For this service he received a fatted porker, a quarter of beef, linen, linsey or perchance, but rare, a piece of blue jeans. Of his family the writer can not speak, but old pioneer boys know more which they cannot reveal, yet all was not concealed. They went from the township many years ago.

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Table of Contents
pages [3]-5  pages 6-9  pages 10-13  pages 14-17  pages 18-21  pages 22-25  pages 26-29
pages 30-33  pages 34-37  pages 38-41  pages 42-45  pages 46-49  pages 50-53  pages 54-57
Surname Index


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