DCOWeb Home > Title page > Table of Contents > Pages 30-33

A PIONEER HISTORY
of
Wayne Tp., Darke County, Ohio
by
Samuel Long
1901
Table of Contents
pages [3]-5  pages 6-9  pages 10-13  pages 14-17  pages 18-21  pages 22-25  pages 26-29
pages 30-33  pages 34-37  pages 38-41  pages 42-45  pages 46-49  pages 50-53  pages 54-57
Surname Index

PIONEER HISTORY

and who was one of the five pioneer boys, who like their fathers, began or made a farm in the primitive forest of their native township. The others were John T. and David Ward and Nicholas and Jacob Marchal. As this farm has passed to the ownership of other families since, from early years, brief mention of them is in order. The first was Mrs. Atwood an immigrant from England. Her only son of agile limbs, climbing a tree to club the nuts from its branches, when at a height of forty-five or fifty feet, lost his balance and fell to the rough roots at the ground. The accident resulted in his death, a sad blow upon a widowed family in a strange land. Of the girls of the family were Maria, Ellen, Emily, Rebecca, and Katurah. Emily married Mr. Fred Leatherman whose family is well known. It was then purchased by Ephram Fahnestock who in a few years sold it to Washington Coudding, a large portly man, and neighborly heart. His widow still survives and is the only nonogenarion grandmother in the township, and that means she has been on earth ninety years, and it must be very lately, if she did not grab up some sort of stick for a staff and walk a mile or more to see her sick neighbor. Of the family there were William, Margaret, Lavina, and Eliza, well known citizens.
      Beyond Greer and adjacent to him was Pitsenbarger's quarter section. This homestead is a place of some historic mention as the United Brethern denomination held forth in early years in this home, and in the barn on "big meeting" occasions and the warmer weather. Thither came the great preachers and the whole Swamp creek populace to hear them. The writer even, in years later on, has some early recollection of gallantry and lovely forms and faces emerging from the old school house, on occasions of divine service or the spelling-bee. Not such, however, as is said to have happened in years, a little earlier. Two gentlemen, in youth well advanced, sought to gallant the same young lady homeward from this old and sacred land-mark, and one who was most in favor, concluded he would let the other gent lead off; the latter accordingly tendered his gallantry to assist the fair one over the rail fence; no sooner was this accomplished than the other gentleman landed his plug hat on the

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PIONEER HISTORY

same side of the fence from which the girl was assisted, and walked off with her, while the first party had to be content with the plug hat. But it is further in evidence, that young men who attended these services, like Peter of old, needed to be converted. On another occasion, a party who was a newcomer and married, was dressed, capapie, in a young gentlemen's new suit, introduced to some fair one as a gentlemen from Troy, Ohio, who was accepted as company homeward. But there was too much gayety manifested, and the gentleman was dismissed at the farm house gate. The matter eked out, but the plot could not be unearthed, and a sad sequel was thus avoided. The mischievous rascals! Of this family was John, Henry, Jonathan, and Sally, prominent old neighbors and citizens. There was another brother on the quarter section eastward. Of this family were Jacob, Henry, Sally, and Sina, well known, these boys were pioneer settlers in Patterson township. Of these families there are quite a generation of descendants, and well known citizens. Joseph Yoder became owner of 80 acres east of John and Jonathan in early years. He came from Stark county, a large muscular man who would not run away from a fistic encounter. Of his children there were Joseph, Christopher, Eli, John, Catharine, Annie, and Barbara and were well known citizens. George Swallow became owner of the north 80 acres east of "King" Henry Pitsenbarger, was a good old Quaker citizen, well remembered. Of his family there were Moses, Catharine, Elizabeth, and the youngest daughter, and Harrison, a grandson, all of whom became 'well known citizens. Metzcar was on the quarter section farthest to the north of the settlement. He was an honest, good Dutchman. Of his family were John and Jacob, well remembered in the earlier years, and the generation of Metzcars were not a few.
      Hugh Davidson was owner of the quarter section east of Metzcar, and on the east side of Swamp creek. He was a Scotch-Irish Presbyterian. Of his family were James, Allen, Robert, Eliza, Rebecca, Jane, Ellen, Margaret, and Cassie. The family was well known and all became prominent citizens, and their generation quite a number. William English

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PIONEER HISTORY

was the owner of a quarter section east of Greer and "Watty" Brandon. He too was a Scotch-Irish Presbyterian and Elder of that congregation, the preachers of which are educated divines, who hed forth from his residence or the old school house hard-by. The congregation of its time was not such a small one. His residence was the finest in the settlement. On his farm was a very large orchard, and he had the great cider press of that time, and two half barrel kettles for making the apple butter. He was owner of the first threshing machine of the settlement, "chaff-piler" called, run by his sons, James and Samuel, two of the strongest young men in the country to lift heavy loads. He was a leading farmer and quite wealthy for his time. Of his children there were James, Samuel, William, and Mary Ellen. They all became prominent citizens, and of their generation a goodly number.
      John Marchall who purchased Alexander Brandon's farm, was one of the first French immigrants, coming as early as 1835. With his farm is connected a religious reminiscence also. Where now is St. Valvert cemetery was erected the first Catholic church in the settlement. Thither came the French pioneers of the Russia and Frenchtown settlement, being midway between, on foot, on horseback, or in wagons to the chapel. The service was conducted in the French language. The writer in his early boyhood attended this service often, as it was near by, and neighboring families were members of the congregation. Oft-times came the wedding concourse to the bridal altar, preceded by a sort of military escort with fire-arms, who gave a military salute at short intervals, followed by the invited guests, young men and maidens, approaching the church, a salute was fired, ranks opened, and the bride and bridegroom, bridesmaid and brideman marched through and up to the hymenial altar, where the priest repeated the marriage service and sent them forth husband and wife. Here too in these days Easter Sunday was a gala day, and a large concourse of people came. On Easter Sunday of 1849, at request, Bishop Percell, preached in the grove near by in the English tongue, using the stump of a great oak for a pulpit. He was a distinguished

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PIONEER HISTORY

prelate and a fluent and polished speaker. Of the family were Nicholas, Jacob, George, John, Joseph, Francis, Louise, Catharine, Mary, and Jane. They were well known in earlier years as of the good citizens, and of their descendants there is quite a generation.
      Peter Batty or Battial was east of Marchall, owning 80 acres. He too was a French immigrant of small stature and a good neighbor. Of his children there were Louis, Frederic, Charles, George, Peter, Eliza, Margaret, and Mary. Three of these died of diphtheria, the first appearance of the disease in the settlement. So alarming and fatal was the epidemic that Dr. Williamson and Samuel English were about the only ones that administered to the family.
      Frederic Batty, a brother, owned 40 acres adjoining on the east. He died in the earlier years, but his widow lived to be quite aged, dying in very recent years. Of his family there were Frederic, Peter, August, Jacob, and Loize. There is a small generation of the Batty descent, well known.
      David* Taylor sr., owned half a section east of Long and Vincent Brandon. He was from the east part of the State and died from accident in the earlier years, but his widow lived many years after, and was long known as Grandma Taylor. Of his family there were Joseph, Thomas, Modest, James, David W., Lucinda, Lavina, and Drusilla. They were all owners of real estate and became well known citizens, especially of the earlier years, and of the descendants there is quite a generation.
      Victor Pilliod owned 40 acres between Taylor and Marchall. He was a Frenchman by birth and a shoemaker by trade. He sold his little farm to D. W. Taylor, many years ago. Of his children remembered, there were George and Frank. Pilliod died at an advanced age. The preceding owners of this tract were Atchison, Taylor, Grandstaff, son-in-law of Taylor, and father of Isaac and Betty as well as Vina heretofore mentioned, who are well remembered.
      Jonathan Smith was east of Pilliod owning 80 acres, He died in the earlier years, but the widow remained on the homestead several years after. Of this family were Jonathan,

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* [Transcriber's note] I think Long is referring to -Joseph- H. Taylor (1783-1842) who died instantly when he fell from a load of hay, breaking his neck. His widow Elizabeth DeLong died in 1867. See Arthur Surprise, These Are My Roots, 1982. Joseph's biography is also given in 150 Years of Progress, Versailles, Ohio, 1964, p. 83.
Table of Contents
pages [3]-5  pages 6-9  pages 10-13  pages 14-17  pages 18-21  pages 22-25  pages 26-29
pages 30-33  pages 34-37  pages 38-41  pages 42-45  pages 46-49  pages 50-53  pages 54-57
Surname Index


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